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Honoring Dr. King, Covid19 Update, Budget update from the ARC, & Opportunities for Civic Engagement


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on January 19, 2021

Good Morning my Family and Community,
I hope each of you had a wonderful Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. Below is the PM Morning report for you.  Sending a virtual smile your way.

As I reflect on the importance of Dr. King’s legacy I can’t help but be mindful of the fact that the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960’s served as the building blocks for the Disability Rights and Independent Living Movements. Dr. King recognized that the Civil Rights Movement needed to embrace all marginalized communities; laying the groundwork for recognizing the importance of intersectionality and the inclusion of people with disabilities in the struggle for rights. Marin CIL is intentional about embracing diversity, equity, and inclusion in all of our programs and services.
“The Marin Center for Independent Living is committed to embracing the values of equity and inclusion of diverse populations of people with disabilities. Furthermore, we believe in a community that treats all with fairness and justice.   While Marin CIL has engaged in and developed multiple programs that are culturally and linguistically competent, we recognize the power of systemic racism and that we have an opportunity to learn and do more.”

Reflecting on Dr. Martin Luther King and Civil Rights Overlooked Goals
Posted On: January 31, 2019
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day is a time for all Americans to reflect upon Dr. King’s efforts and accomplishments, as well as his unrealized goal of creating a fully equitable and accessible society. In the years following his death, two important issues regarding Dr. King’s work and the Civil Rights Movement seem to have been forgotten, eliminated or at least obfuscated, either intentionally or inadvertently by the mists of time. First, we fail to emphasize Dr. King’s important realization, only a year before his assassination, that his Civil Rights Movement had to include all marginalized people, an insight that linked the Civil Rights and the Disability Rights Movements. Secondly, as he broadened the audience included in the movement, he narrowed the focus of his activity to the issue of employment as the key to achieving the goal of a Just Society.
Most people equate the words “minorities and civil rights” with African-American populations; whereas people with disabilities are seldom perceived of as a minority at all, when, in actuality, they comprise the largest minority group in the US. Each minority group has its own life experiences and different sources and degrees of oppression and discrimination. Granted, a blind person has never been lynched because he or she is blind, nor has a person who uses a wheelchair had a cross burned in the front lawn because he moved to a certain neighborhood. Nonetheless, people with disabilities have been marginalized all throughout history.
African-Americans have experienced oppression and discrimination from a system created, legislated and maintained by bigotry and downright hatred; whereas people with disabilities suffer oppression and discrimination at the hands of a paternalistic system that offers “discrimination with the smile” and the best of intentions– intentions that usually reflect a need to maintain the status quo.
African American children were prevented from attending certain public schools by codes and laws. Children with disabilities were prevented from attending certain schools by smiling and well-meaning education officials who told parents that “it is better for both children with disabilities and ‘normal’ children if the disabled kids are educated at home or at least in ‘special classes.’” Both experiences, be it overt or covert discrimination, represent the exercise of the establishment’s power. But “Separate Is Not Equal!”
While people with disabilities cannot equate their experiences with 500 years of slavery and dehumanization, that shouldn’t discount the consideration that members of this minority group, all throughout history, have suffered from dehumanization, infanticide, euthanasia, and institutionalization.
It was less than a year before his assassination that Dr. King decided to include all marginalized people into a movement that would make the nation realize and appreciate the injustice, oppression and antidemocratic nature of poverty and lack of opportunity. Though people with disabilities were probably not on his radar screen or involved in the movement at the moment they were taking notes and realized sooner than many African-American leaders that not only is “Separate Unequal! Separate is also Weak and Ineffective!”
Just as Dr. King decided to change and re-create his movement, mainstream American history decide to change its view of Dr. King’s tactics and his objectives. In his book, The Radical King, Cornell West asserts that Dr. King has been deodorized, sanitized and “Santa-Clausified” by history. Due to a type of “historical amnesia,” West notes people have forgotten that almost ¾ of White Americans perceived Dr. King as an unpatriotic threat to this country because of his attitude and actions concerning the Vietnam War and ending Poverty. West also points out that, “even a slight majority of African-Americans believed that Dr. King was, “setting the black freedom movement back.”
In fact, one of the most iconic pictures in the collective memory of the US is Dr. King giving his “I Have a Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial. Very few people will remember that that the FBI sent out a memo decrying Dr. King as “the most dangerous Negro of the future in this nation from the standpoint of communism, the Negro and national security” and even fewer will recall that Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech was given to publicize what Dr. King described as the Fourth Revolution, which he called the “Poor People’s Campaign” and that that particular event at the Lincoln Memorial was named the “March for Jobs.”
Dr. King realized that employment was the key to self-sufficiency, independence, and equality. “If a man doesn’t have a job or an income, he has neither life nor liberty nor the possibility for the pursuit of happiness.”
The general population is quite familiar with Dr. King’s statements, such as “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere” and with his dream that his children might be judged “not by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” Do you think there’s a chance that we’ll hear the following quote from Dr. King in 2019? “A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death.”
In short, Dr. King realized that all marginalized groups—such as African-Americans or Americans with disabilities—must join together and form one united and powerful force working for everyone’s civil rights. Access to meaningful employment and economic independence will help us realize a more just society for all. This year let us remember that in unity we can tap into Dr. King’s power.
Thank you Dr. King!
Source: Reflecting on Dr. Martin Luther King and Civil Rights Overlooked Goals






County of Marin Update

Marin Vaccine Update: Preparing to Move into Phase 1B
Marin County’s network of health care providers and supportive agencies are working closely to prepare to transition to Phase 1B of the COVID-19 vaccination framework soon, offering vaccinations to frontline essential workers and those aged 65 and over.
Hear more from Dr. Willis about the effort behind Marin County’s mass vaccination clinic, the partnership and volunteerism that makes this possible, and what’s in store as Marin County moves into Tier 1B later this week.
WATCH ON YOUTUBE
  
Sharing from CDCAN
WHEN: JANUARY 20, 2021 - WEDNESDAY
TIME: 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM (Pacific Time)  
WHO: CALIFORNIA  HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CHSS) AGENCY AND THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH (CDPH)
WHAT: COMMUNITY VACCINE ADVISORY COMMITTEE - MEETING #8
MEETING INFORMATION  - TWO WAYS TO PARTICIPATE IN MEETING
  CALL-IN NUMBER (LISTEN ONLY):
    ENGLISH - CALL IN NUMBER: 844-721-7237
    ENGLISH - CALL IN NUMBER PASSCODE:  2243784
    SPANISH - CALL IN NUMBER: 877-402-9753
    SPANISH - CALL IN NUMBER PASSCODE: 1424990
YOUTUBE LIVESTREAM: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkNEUkIwtlc_kPenEZMUlOw

WHEN: JANUARY 21, 2021 - THURSDAY  
TIME: 10:30 AM (Pacific Time)
WHO: STATE SENATE EDUCATION COMMITTEE AND SENATE BUDGET SUBCOMMITTEE #1 ON EDUCATION
WHAT: JOINT INFORMATIONAL HEARING 
SUBJECT: Governor’s Safe Schools for All Plan: Will it Help Schools Open Safely?
WHERE: State Capitol - Room 4203
LIVESTREAM LINK: https://www.senate.ca.gov/calendar
  Step 1: Scroll down to "Committee Hearings"
  Step 2: Scroll down to "Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee"
  Step 3: Click on "Watch Hearing" for livestream video or "Listen" if you want audio only
  Note: to make public comments remotely please see below to make public comments by phone.
CALL-IN NUMBER - LISTEN ONLY (to listen only, but not make public comments): 1-888-251-2909 
CALL-IN NUMBER ACCESS CODE  - LISTEN ONLY (to listen only, but not make public comments): 7362832
RECORDED VIDEO OF HEARING (usually posted for download within a day or so) - scroll down to hearing date :https://www.senate.ca.gov/media-archive
HEARING DOCUMENTS

WHEN: JANUARY 21, 2021 - THURSDAY  
TIME: 3:00 - 4:00 PM (Pacific Time)
WHO: GOVERNOR'S OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES - OFFICE OF ACCESS AND FUNCTIONAL NEEDS [logo pictured below right]
WHAT: COVID-19 UPDATE - VACCINE UPDATE (open to public stakeholders)
TWO WAYS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE MEETING:
    USING ZOOM (NO advance registration needed): Participants will be able to ask questions and provide comments using chat feature (raise hands or type in comment or question) or by the call-in line below).
    ZOOM MEETING LINK:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86066941378
    ZOOM MEETING ID: 860 6694 1378  
                                  OR
   CALL-IN LINE:1-669-900-9128 ("Welcome to Zoom")
   CALL-IN PASSCODE: 86066941378#
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
L. Vance Taylor - Chief, Office of Access and Functional Needs
California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services
3650 Schriever Avenue
Mather, CA  95655
Office Phone: 916-845-8202
Email: vance.taylor@caloes.ca.gov
Governor's Office of Emergency Services/Office of Access and Functional Needs webpage:
https://www.caloes.ca.gov/cal-oes-divisions/access-functional-needs

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin’s former Whistlestop nonprofit names new chief
By ADRIAN RODRIGUEZ | arodriguez@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: January 18, 2021 at 5:52 p.m. | UPDATED: January 19, 2021 at 7:26 a.m.
Vivalon, the San Rafael organization formerly known as Whistlestop, has named a veteran nonprofit leader as its new chief executive.
The move comes as a key moment for the organization, which serves older and disabled adults. Construction is expected to begin this year on the nonprofit’s new campus in downtown San Rafael.
“It’s exciting that there is so much that we’re doing right now,” said Anne Grey, 55, of Larkspur, the new chief executive. “During COVID, we’ve pivoted Vivalon to virtual programs, expanded food services, just really being able to rise to the occasion — meeting the needs of the community.”
Grey began her new role last week working alongside retiring chief executive Joe O’Hehir, who is exiting the organization after 12 years. His last day is Feb. 28.
For full article: Marin’s former Whistlestop nonprofit names new chief
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL welcomes Anne Grey to her new position and looks forward to working with her in her new role. Marin CIL values Vivalon as one of our important partners supporting the independence of older adults and people with disabilities in community. Marin CIL wants to express our appreciation to Joe O’Hehir, Vivalon’s retiring Chief Executive Officer. Joe has been a strong supporter of Marin CIL, a good friend, and a strong champion for older adults. We wish him all the best in his next chapter. We value and appreciate his many years of devoted service to our communities.

 Marin hospitals nix Moderna vaccine batch after state alert
By MATTHEW PERA | mpera@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: January 18, 2021 at 6:54 a.m. | UPDATED: January 19, 2021 at 7:26 a.m.
Hospitals in Marin have stopped using a batch of the Moderna coronavirus vaccine after state officials warned of a series of allergic reactions in Southern California.
An abnormally high number of people experienced anaphylactic shock, a severe allergic reaction that requires immediate medical attention, after receiving a shot of the Moderna vaccine at one San Diego vaccination site, Dr. Erica Pan, California’s top epidemiologist, said in statement Sunday night.
While the number was fewer than 10, the cluster of negative reactions prompted the California Department of Public Health to recommend pausing the administration of some 330,000 doses from the batch, which had been distributed throughout the state, until an investigation was complete.
“A higher-than-usual number of possible allergic reactions were reported with a specific lot of Moderna vaccine administered at one community vaccination clinic,” Pan said. “Out of an extreme abundance of caution and also recognizing the extremely limited supply of vaccine, we are recommending that providers use other available vaccine inventory and pause the administration of vaccines from Moderna Lot 041L20A until the investigation by the CDC, FDA, Moderna and the state is complete.”
For full article: Marin hospitals nix Moderna vaccine batch after state alert

Sharing from The ARC of California
Governor’s January Budget Summary
Governor Newsom released his 2020-21 budget blueprint. The budget projects a one-time windfall of revenue despite the challenges of the pandemic; however, the governor’s budget hedges against a possible revenue shortfall in the following year/s. The proposed budget will now be debated by the legislature and a final budget will be sent to the Governor for approval in June. Below is a summary of the governor’s proposed budget and its impact on Californians with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families:
Regional Center Services
The proposed budget estimates regional center caseload growth to 368,753 clients and a total budget of $10.5 billion. Budget highlights include:
•      Extends the provider supplemental rate increases to December 31, 2022, instead of the existing elimination date of December 31, 2021.
•      Similarly, extends the suspension of the mandated 14 furlough days (aka Uniform Holiday Schedule) to December 31, 2022.
•      Creates a new Community Navigator Program to partner with Family Resource Centers to increase access and outreach to underserved communities.
•      Creates new Emergency Preparedness/Response Coordinators in each regional center.
•      Expands the Systemic, Therapeutic, Assessment, Resources, and Treatment (START) Services.
•      Greatly expands supports and resources for individuals with IDD that are involved with the criminal justice system.
•      DOES NOT propose any investments to fund the $1.4 billion underfunding to regional center service as identified in the 2019 DDS Rate Study.
Pandemic Response
The Budget includes $211.7 million ($150.4 million General Fund) to address COVID-19 impacts on the developmental services system. Funding supports utilization increases for purchase of services above base funding levels and direct response expenditures for surge capacity at the Fairview and Porterville Developmental Centers and other operating costs in state-operated facilities.
Family Resource Centers and Community Navigators
The Budget includes $5.3 million ($3.2 million General Fund) for the Department of Developmental Services to contract with family resource centers to implement a navigator model statewide. The navigator model would utilize parents of individuals in the regional center system to provide education on resources, advocacy, and mentorship to other parents of individuals being served by the regional center system. The purpose of navigators is to increase service authorization and utilization in diverse communities, furthering health equity within the developmental services system. Funding includes resources for a one-time independent evaluation focused on improving the effectiveness of existing disparity projects.
SSI/SSP
The budget includes no increase for the State Supplemental Payment (SSP). Effective January 2021, the maximum SSI/SSP grant levels are $955 per month for individuals and $1,598 per month for couples. The projected growth in the Consumer Price Index is 2.2 percent for 2022. As a result, the maximum SSI/SSP monthly grant levels will increase by approximately $17 and $26 for individuals and couples, respectively, effective January 2021.
Read Full Text Here
Family Caregivers and Direct Support Staff are Prioritized for Vaccines, as Confirmed in New Letters from Department of Developmental Services
Last week the California Department of Developmental Services confirmed that family caregivers, direct support staff, and certain regional center employees are eligible for phase 1A vaccine prioritization. These letters can be helpful for families, service providers, and regional centers in access to phase 1A vaccines if encountering challenges at the county level.
For Direct Service Employees
For Family Members
For Certain Regional Center Employees
Families:
The purpose of this letter is to clarify that family members of certain people are “health care workers” pursuant to the State of California’s Vaccination Plan and thus are prioritized for COVID-19 vaccination within Phase 1A.
Employees:
The purpose of this letter is to clarify that these providers’ employees who provide direct care, in-home-support and other health and developmental services are “health care workers” pursuant to the State of California’s Vaccination Plan, and thus are prioritized for COVID-19 vaccination within Phase 1A.
These contracted service providers include, but are not limited to:

  • Intermediate care facilities for persons who need non-continuous nursing supervision and supportive care
  • Other licensed adult residential facilities
  • Congregate living health facilities
  • Home health care and in-home supportive services
  • Community health workers, including promotoras
  • Supported living and independent living services providers
  • Family home agencies and their subcontractors
  • Other in-home service providers, including individuals such as respite workers, clinical staff, applied behavioral analysis providers, staff providing independent living skills training, and staff providing Early Start services
Source: Family Caregivers and Direct Support Staff are Prioritized for Vaccines, as Confirmed in New Letters from Department of Developmental Services

The Arc’s Self-Advocates and Sibling Councils
Apply Today! The Arc’s 2021-2022 National Council of SelfAdvocates
We are looking for new officers to lead our National Council of Self-Advocates (NCSA). Our National Council of Self Advocates is led by people with IDD, and NCSA members are people with disabilities nationwide. Our officers advise The Arc on our advocacy, programs, and services to make sure the voices of people with IDD are heard. They also often take part in our federal advocacy efforts – sharing their stories with our network!
Want to apply? Click here.
Deadline to Apply: February 5. Questions? Contact Jenny Alexander at alexander@thearc.org.
Apply to The Arc’s 2021-2022 National Sibling Council Are you a sibling of a person with an intellectual and/developmental disability (IDD) looking to get more involved in disability rights activism? Consider joining The Arc’s National Sibling Council! The Arc seeks applications from siblings who are eager to take a leadership role in The Arc’s advocacy movement. Siblings are an important part of the disability rights movement and we want your voice and perspective as we work to promote and protect the rights of individuals with IDD throughout the country. Deadline to Apply: February 5.
Have questions? Contact Liz Mahar at mahar@thearc.org
Source: The Arc’s Self-Advocates and Sibling Councils

 Sharing from Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California


"Violence never brings peace" - Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
1/15/2021
As the day for celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King approaches, we have an opportunity to reflect on the past year with its many challenges – from COVID, to the police brutality that ignited the BLM movement, to the recent events at the Capitol; all these events inform our future actions and strategies.

Following Dr. King's assassination on April 4, 1968, and as the nation mourned him and angry riots raged in America's cities, President Lyndon Johnson pushed Congress to pass the Fair Housing Act. On April 11, 1968, seven days after Dr. King’s death, the Federal Fair Housing Act was finally enacted into law – a lasting legacy of a man who had put the issue of fair housing firmly on the map in 1966 with the Chicago freedom movement, and who had been at the forefront of the struggle for racial equality in the United States.

More than 50 years later, COVID-19 has highlighted the same racial inequities present in housing opportunities and accumulation of wealth. As the Black Lives Matter movement gained momentum over the past year, so too did the white supremacist movement, something made abundantly clear on January 6, as our Capitol was overrun by rioters attempting to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election and the Confederate flag flew inside the Capitol. In these unprecedented times, I’m reminded of Dr. King’s insistence on peaceful protests, and these words when he accepted the Nobel Peace prize in 1964:

“Violence as a way of achieving racial justice is both impractical and immoral. I am not unmindful of the fact that violence often brings about momentary results. Nations have frequently won their independence in battle. But in spite of temporary victories, violence never brings permanent peace. It solves no social problem: it merely creates new and more complicated ones. Violence is impractical because it is a descending spiral ending in destruction for all. It is immoral because it seeks to humiliate the opponent rather than win his understanding: it seeks to annihilate rather than convert. Violence is immoral because it thrives on hatred rather than love. It destroys community and makes brotherhood impossible. It leaves society in monologue rather than dialogue. Violence ends up defeating itself.”

These are fitting words for where we now find ourselves. 

I, along with our agency, recommit ourselves to the work we've undertaken to serve our community. In 2020, our agency began internally examining how to incorporate more anti-racist values into our policies, procedures, and individual beliefs. We are continuing to reflect on and implement them in 2021. We are committed to supporting the Black Lives Matter movement. Our advocacy with our local government agencies and recipients of federal housing to understand and commit to the mandate to affirmatively further fair housing – that is, actively address and work to eliminate housing discrimination and segregation – is ongoing. We redoubled our efforts to support and enforce our civil rights laws that the current administration did its best to undermine, and joined a federal lawsuit challenging the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s recent reversal of long-standing fair housing protections.

There is hope: the new administration has clearly signaled its commitment to governance and to civil rights. That has been made clear through its choice of Marcia Fudge as the Secretary of HUD and Merrick Garland as U.S. Attorney General. 

I couldn’t be prouder of our staff as they recommit themselves daily to our mission and to help victims of housing discrimination. In the coming weeks and months, we will learn more about how many or to what extent our political leaders will attempt to curtail their previous commitments to racial equity. In the multiracial society we live in, we all have a part to play in continuing to push for racial equity and anti-racism. 

Thank you for your support and joining us in the peaceful struggle.

Caroline Peattie
Executive Director
Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California​
Source: "Violence Never Brings Peace"- Dr. Martin Luther King Jr


The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Covid-19 Update, News from DRC, CDA Webinar Supporting Elders in the Black Community, and More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on January 15, 2021

Good Morning my Cherished Family and Community,
I hope you are all doing well today. Welcome to the PM Morning Report. It been an active week. This morning once again started early for me. I am feeling the call of the coffee bean once again. Wishing everyone a wonderful weekend. Sending a virtual smile to you today

County of Marin Update
Top Vaccination Questions Answered
As you likely know, the COVID-19 vaccination process is underway in Marin County. We understand staying on top of the latest details can be confusing. Things change, sometimes daily, sometimes hourly. With so many messages coming from the state and neighboring counties, Marin County Public Health has attempted to simplify things by answering some of your top questions, including:

  • Where to get the latest info?
  • Who can be vaccinated right now?
  • How is the current group being vaccinated?
  • What are the phases of distribution?
  • How will I know when its my turn?
View the news release.
 
 
New Allotment of Rental Assistance Heads to Marin
More federal stimulus money is being provided to Marin renters who have experienced economic hardship because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The County is receiving an estimated $7.75 million by early February as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, passed by Congress in late December. The funding is earmarked for current and past rent, current and past utilities and home energy costs, and other housing expenses tied to the viral outbreak.
The $7.75 million is on top of nearly $6 million in local funding already allocated through Marin’s safety-net rental assistance program started in March 2020.
Anyone who is homeless, qualified for unemployment benefits, experienced a reduction in income, incurred significant COVID-related costs, or endured other financial hardship due to the coronavirus is eligible to apply for the new funding. Priority is given to households that are considered extremely low income, which in Marin would be a family of three with an income of no more than $43,550. Anyone needing help paying rent may call (415) 473-2223 or email staff to learn more about the Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which is open for applications.
For more information, continuing reading the full news release.
 
 
Supervisors Pass New Eviction Moratorium
After implementing eviction protections for residents during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Board of Supervisors unanimously passed a resolution January 12 that continues to bar evictions through June for people economically impacted by the coronavirus.
Planners from the Marin County Community Development Agency worked with the Board’s Housing Subcommittee to create language that reinstates a local moratorium first enacted March 24, 2020, when households began to suffer negative financial impacts directly tied to the pandemic. The moratorium was extended four times.
Landlords are now prohibited from evicting a tenant through June 30 if the tenant has an economic hardship that is directly tied to COVID-19.
View the news release to learn more. More documents and information for renters and landlords related to the eviction moratorium can be found on the County’s Renter and Landlord Resources webpage.
 
 
MLK Jr. Holiday Schedule for COVID-19 Updates
Some of our services will pause on Monday, January 18, in observance of the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday.  This includes:
  • Data and Surveillance Webpage: no update on January 18, but updates will resume on January 19. Testing data will not update and will show as +0 on both the surveillance page and the data snapshot found on https://coronavirus.marinhhs.org.
  • Marin County COVID-19 Status Update: will pause on Monday in recognition of the holiday, but will be back in your inbox on Tuesday, January 19.
 
 
 
Sharing from the California Department of Aging
February 3, 2021: Our second webinar of 2021 will focus on Culturally Informed Policy and Programs for Black EldersJoin Le Ondra Clark Harvey, PhD, CA Council of Community Behavioral Health Agencies; Lisa Tealer, Bay Area Community Health Advisory Council; and Jonathan Butler, PhD, UCSF NURTURE Center for a discussion on how we can build community, provide services, and create opportunities with and for Black older adults. Time will be reserved for Q&A. Closed Captioning will be available.
 Register for this webinar here.

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal

Marin sticks with coronavirus tests despite FDA accuracy warning
By MATTHEW PERA | mpera@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: January 14, 2021 at 5:45 p.m. | UPDATED: January 15, 2021 at 7:15 a.m.
In Relevant Part
A new type of coronavirus test being provided to Marin residents could be generating inaccurate results, according to new guidance from federal officials.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned this month that the tests, made by the biotechnology company Curative, come with a risk of false negative results.
In order to reduce the risk of inaccurate results, the tests should only be given to people with symptoms of coronavirus, the FDA said.
Health officials announced last month that Marin County had partnered with Curative to offer up to 500 of the company’s tests per day to anyone, regardless of whether they have health insurance or symptoms of the virus.
The schedule for Curative testing sites in Marin:
Bolinas: Mondays, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Bolinas Fire Station, 100 Mesa Road
Larkspur: Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Piper Park, 250 Doherty Drive
Novato: Fridays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Novato Library, 1720 Novato Blvd.
San Anselmo: Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., United Market, 100 Red Hill Ave.
San Geronimo: Mondays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., San Geronimo Golf Course parking lot, 5800 Sir Francis Drake Blvd.
San Rafael: Mondays and Wednesdays, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Tuesdays, Thursday and Sundays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Armory Parking Lot on Armory Drive
Sausalito: Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Lot #2, 50-98 Humboldt Ave.

For Full Article: Marin sticks with coronavirus tests despite FDA accuracy warning

Sharing from Disability Rights California
Judge to Weigh Risk of Mass Release of Psychiatric Patients
Jan. 12, 2021, 8:12 AM
  • California psychiatric hospital riddled with Covid; 14 patients dead
  • Court must consider risk to public versus welfare of patients
A federal judge Tuesday will consider whether to release hundreds of patients from California’s largest psychiatric hospital due to soaring Covid-19 rates, a move state health officials say would put the public at risk.
Lawyers for patients of Patton State Hospital in San Bernardino used the state’s own words against it in a court filing last week to argue for the release, quoting a separate case in which a California Department of State Hospitals official said the state’s psychiatric facilities have “exquisite and unique vulnerabilities” when it comes to the virus.
“Even simple public health measures like social distancing, cough covering [and] hand washing, is difficult in our population because we are psychiatric facilities,” said Katherine Warburton, medical director of DSH in October testimony in Coleman v. Newsom, a case in which DSH is seeking to avoid accepting new patients from California state prisons.
DSH is in an unusual and difficult position—arguing that Patton is safe enough from Covid-19 to keep the patients it currently has, yet too dangerous to take on any more from state prisons that are also bursting at the seams. The situation mirrors logistical tensions playing out at facilities in other states.
Judge Jesus G. Bernal, of U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, will hear from both sides in Hart v. Clendenin on a motion by DSH to stay the case and motions by plaintiffs to certify a class of patients at Patton and for a temporary restraining order that would release up to half of the patient population.
For full article: Judge to Weigh Risk of Mass Release of Psychiatric Patients
About DRC: Disability Rights California (DRC) is the agency designated under federal law to protect and advocate for the rights of Californians with disabilities.
What the do: DRC works in litigation, legal representation, advocacy services, investigations, public policy, and provide information, advice, referral, and community outreach.
For more than 40 years, DRC has worked to advance the rights of Californians with disabilities in education, employment, independence, health, and safety, and has grown into the largest disability rights organization in the nation.

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Covid-19 Info, Filing a Complaint with OCR, BOS Extends Eviction Ban, Vaccine Strategy Meeting


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on January 14, 2021

Good Morning my Family and Community,
I hope you are all doing well today. Marin CIL’s advocacy desk has been busy this morning. Lot’s going on. Definitely a good day for coffee and chocolate to start the morning. Don’t worry I did include blueberry waffles in the mix. Here is the PM Morning Report for you. Wishing you the very best and sending you a virtual smile this morning.

Marin County COVID-19 Status Update: January 13, 2021
The Marin County COVID-19 Status Update is published daily to share important news and resources related to the COVID-19 pandemic and to keep the local economy running. We remain here for you.
 
Marin’s Vaccine Clinic Operating Smoothly
Our Point of Dispensing vaccine clinic -- or “POD” – in San Rafael is serving up to 1,000 people per day providing first doses to a wide array of health care workers (and second doses to those who receive their first dose a few weeks ago).
Here is an insider view of our POD and more information about our planning efforts to serve the next phase of distribution, including the many older adults in our community.
WATCH ON ABC7News.COM
Know a Marin County healthcare worker in need of a vaccine? Refer them to our COVID-19 vaccine distribution webpage for information on eligibility and access.
 
Marin Leaders Advocate for Greater Vaccine Supply
Today, the Marin County Board of Supervisors sent a letter to Governor Gavin Newsom advocating for additional vaccine supply to be allocated to Marin County.
Marin County continues Phase 1A (health care workers) vaccine distribution and is planning its advance to Phase 1B when supplies allow. Due to scarce vaccine allocation and limited resources, we are distributing vaccine in Marin County based on recommendations from CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, prioritizing 1) prevention of morbidity and mortality and 2) preservation of societal functioning. 
With 1 in 4 Marin residents over the age of 65, a group that is at higher risk of adverse outcomes from COVID-19, we know how important it is to be able to vaccinate this group quickly. Unfortunately, Marin’s vaccine allocation from the state is determining how quickly we can move in vaccinating our older adults. We have not received the vaccine supply necessary to launch Phase 1B in Marin County.
View The Letter
 
 Sharing from CDCAN

JANUARY 13, 2021 - STATE CAPITOL UPDATE
NEW COVID-19 VACCINES: DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES ISSUES LETTERS FOR REGIONAL CENTER SYSTEM DIRECT SERVICE EMLPOYEES, FAMILY MEMBERS OF CERTAIN INDIVIDUALS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES  AND CERTAIN REGIONAL CENTER EMPLOYEES
Clarifies Those Individuals as "Health Care Workers" Under State's Vaccination Plan and Prioritized for COVID-19 Vaccination Within Phase 1A - Updated Frequently Asked Questions from Department of Developmental Services

 
SACRAMENTO, CA [BY MARTY OMOTO, CDCAN LAST UPDATED  01/13/2021 04:35 PM] - The Department of Developmental Services (DDS), the state agency that oversees the 21 non-profit regional centers who coordinate funding and services to over 350,000, infants and toddlers (in Early Start), and children and adults with developmental disabilities, issued three letters this afternoon (January 13th), clarifying that regional center system direct service employees, family members of certain individuals with developmental disabilities, and certain regional center employees are considered by the State as "health care workers"  under California’s Vaccination Plan, and thus are prioritized for COVID-19 vaccination within Phase 1A.
CDCAN NOTE: To receive the free CDCAN Reports, send email request to Marty Omoto (with "CDCAN Reports Subscribe" in the subject line) to: martyomoto@att.net
    .
LINKS TO THE UPDATED FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS AND LETTERS CLARIFYING COVID-19 VACCINATION ELIGIBILITY FOR PHASE 1A
  
  The following, compiled by CDCAN, are the links to the UPDATED (as of January 13, 2021) Frequently Asked Questions from the Department of Developmental Services (DDS), and the three letters released this afternoon (January 13, 2021) clarifying COVID-19 vaccination eligibility for Phase 1A. People impacted should print out the letter that applies to them and give it to their health care provider or others dispensing the vaccines for them:

UPDATED JAN 13, 2021 - FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ON COVID-19 VACCINATIONS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES - PDF Document (5 pages):
https://www.dds.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Vaccine_FAQ_01132021.pdf
Sharing from the SILC
The Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) will hold a webinar to provide an overview of the relaunch of the  California Advancing and Innovating Medi-Cal (CalAIM) initiative on January 28, from 2 – 3 p.m. Please register for the webinar here if you are interested in attending.
About CalAIM: The Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) has developed a framework that encompasses broad-based delivery system, program and payment reform across the Medi-Cal program, called CalAIM: California Advancing and Innovating Medi-Cal. CalAIM advances several key priorities of the Administration by leveraging Medicaid as a tool to help address many of the complex challenges facing California’s most vulnerable residents, such as homelessness, behavioral health care access, children with complex medical conditions, the growing number of justice-involved populations who have significant clinical needs, and the growing aging population. This proposal recognizes the opportunity to provide for non-clinical interventions focused on a whole-person care approach via Medi-Cal that targets social determinants of health and reduces health disparities and inequities.

How to File a Complaint with the Office for Civil Rights
The Office for Civil Right’s mission is to ensure equal access to education and to promote educational excellence through vigorous enforcement of civil rights in our nation’s schools.
The Office for Civil Rights enforces several Federal civil rights laws that prohibit discrimination in programs or activities that receive federal financial assistance from the Department of Education. Discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin is prohibited by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; sex discrimination is prohibited by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972; discrimination on the basis of disability is prohibited by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and age discrimination is prohibited by the Age Discrimination Act of 1975. These civil rights laws enforced by OCR extend to all state education agencies, elementary and secondary school systems, colleges and universities, vocational schools, proprietary schools, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, libraries, and museums that receive U.S. Department of Education funds. 
VIDEO: How to File an OCR Complaint

Sharing from the Disability Organizing Network
Andy Imparato (Executive Director, Disability Rights California),  Aaron Carruthers (Executive Director of State Council on Developmental Disabilities and Christina Mills (Executive Director, California Foundation for Independent Living Centers- Marin CILs membership Organization) have some updates they’d like to share from a statewide vaccine advocacy perspective and more importantly to discuss best practices for developing county strategies to get the vaccine to people with disabilities. 
Topic: C19 Vaccine Strategy Meeting
Time: Jan 14, 2021 06:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)
 Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85702380573
Meeting ID: 857 0238 0573
One tap mobile
+16699006833,,85702380573# US (San Jose)

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Email foul-up in Marin draws ineligible virus vaccine seekers
By MATTHEW PERA | mpera@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: January 13, 2021 at 5:47 p.m. | UPDATED: January 13, 2021 at 5:54 p.m.
Hundreds of people ineligible for coronavirus vaccinations signed up for shots this week after a link to Marin County’s appointment system was shared on social media, a health official said.
The link was initially sent in an email to health care workers, who are included in the first phase of the county’s effort to distribute its limited supply of Moderna and Pfizer vaccines.
“What occurred is, somewhere one of our health care providers forwarded that link to someone else,” said Dr. Matt Willis, Marin County’s public health officer. “That link went out, and it was separated from all the contextual information that normally goes along with it.”
The link opens up an online software system, PrepMod, which California is using to coordinate vaccine distribution. It allows people to sign up for a time slot to be vaccinated at the Marin County Civic Center. It typically comes in an email explaining that first vaccine doses in Marin are being offered only to a select group of people, including health care workers, first responders and nursing home patients.
County officials quickly closed the registration system on Sunday after they were notified that the link had been shared on social media sites, Willis said. Officials then sent out an email to anyone who had signed up for an appointment, notifying them that shots would only be given to health care workers who could show medical credentials to those administering the vaccines.
For full article: Email foul-up in Marin draws ineligible virus vaccine seekers

Marin supervisors approve 5-month eviction ban
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: January 13, 2021 at 5:06 p.m. | UPDATED: January 13, 2021 at 5:45 p.m.
Marin landlords soon will be barred from evicting tenants who can’t pay their rent because of the pandemic.
Marin County supervisors voted unanimously Tuesday to enact the moratorium, which takes effect Feb. 1 and lasts through June 30.
“We have to do this to keep people housed in Marin,” said Supervisor Dennis Rodoni, the board president. “We don’t have a choice.”
The resolution prohibits landlords from attempting to evict a residential tenant if the tenant has provided a declaration of coronavirus-related financial distress within 15 days of receiving notice demanding payment of rent.
The tenants, however, will still owe the unpaid rent and can be sued for the money. Tenants who notify their landlords as specified will have up to 90 days after June 30 to pay the overdue rent before they will be deemed to be in default.
Unlike most other county resolutions, this action will also apply to renters in all of Marin’s 11 municipalities as well as the unincorporated area of Marin governed by the supervisors.
The action was supported by the Marin County public health officer, Dr. Matt Willis.
In a statement, Willis wrote that “renters who have lost income due to COVID-19 may be at risk of homelessness if they are evicted for nonpayment of rent.”
Willis added, “Such displacement, destabilization and any increase in homelessness would increase the risk of transmission of COVID-19 throughout the county.”
For full article: Marin supervisors approve 5-month eviction ban
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL provides important safety-net services and advocacy support for people with disabilities and older adults. One of the most frequently requested services is housing support. This includes housing retention and advocacy. Marin CIL together with community members and our  community partners Legal Aid of Marin, Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California, California Alliance for Retired Americans (CARA), Marin Community Action Team (Marin CAT), Marin Environmental Housing Collaborative, and the Marin Aging Action Initiative have been working collaboratively to support various housing sustainability initiatives including Fair Housing ordinances, rental protections, and both Project Roomkey and Project Homekey programs. Marin CIL appreciates our Board of Supervisors extending eviction protection for an additional 5 months. This is good news for people with disabilities and older adults in our communities.

San Rafael school district launches mental health service
By KERI BRENNER | kbrenner@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: January 13, 2021 at 6:38 p.m. | UPDATED: January 13, 2021 at 6:48 p.m.
San Rafael City Schools is launching a free mental health service for district students, families and staff.
Superintendent Jim Hogeboom said this week the district was launching Care Solace, a round-the-clock online assistance to help people find local mental health-related programs and counseling.
He said district students, workers and families will be able to access Care Solace either through a dedicated phone line or website.
“All school staff and families can use the tool to connect with community-based mental health care resources and providers,” Hogeboom said. “Their proprietary care navigation system taps into a vast database of mental health care resources to find carefully vetted local therapists and programs in minutes.”
More information is at caresolace.com/srcs.
“SRCS is dedicated to prioritizing mental health and wellness, and is excited to bring this new resource to our community,” Hogeboom said.
Focus continues statewide on strengthening mental health resources during the pandemic. On Tuesday, a coalition to improve mental health for kids, families and school staff was also announced.
For full article: San Rafael school district launches mental health service

Sharing from the Aging Action Initiative
Brain health and reducing risk of cognitive decline
Friday, January 15, 9am-12:15pm (English); Friday, January 22, 9am-12:15pm (Spanish)
The Alzheimer’s Association, in conjunction with Collabria Care, is holding its winter education conference. The keynote speaker is Dr. Sergio Lanata, assistant professor of Clinical Neurology at UCSF Memory and Aging Center, and the topics will focus on the many aspects of maintaining a brain-healthy lifestyle, latest updates on Alzheimer's science and understanding memory loss: what is normal and what is not. Register here (English) or here (Spanish). Questions about this event should be directed to Shelley Dombroski at sdombroski@alz.org.

Save the date: Inform & Connect resumes January 25!
AAI's Inform & Connect program will resume on Monday, January 25 at 2pm with a presentation about COVID: the latest about sheltering, care, vaccines and more. Registration info to come.
Source: Marin Aging Action Initiative






 
 

 

Supervisor Arnold Talks About the Loss of Her Sister, DRC Budget Analysis, Money Follows the Person


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on January 13, 2021

Good Morning my Family and Community,

I hope you are doing well today. Certainly a lot going on in our world. Today as I am writing the PM Morning Report I am reflecting on current events. Our country and our world is going through a challenging time on many fronts. As we continue to work for equity and justice through the work we do serving our communities it’s important that we remember to practice self-care. I wanted to remind folks about the warm line which is a great resource (available in both English and Spanish). We all need you need someone to talk to. Through the warm line you can also find out about additional resources available to you. If you are a person with a disability or older adult always feel free to reach out to Marin CIL if there is anything we can do to support you. Sending each of you a virtual smile today.

Warmline Now in Spanish | Support During Difficult Times
Posted on March 25, 2020 Category Updates Tagged Mental HealthPeer SupportWarmlineWellness
UPDATED January 6, 2021
In an effort to curb the spread of COVID 19, state and local officials have issued a shelter in place order. As a result, many of us are experiencing fear about the future, confusion, and loneliness due to restricted contact with our peers, friends, and loved ones. Even though the Enterprise Recovery Center is closed at this time, we are still available to help.
A new report from the Kaiser Family Foundation reveals that mental health issues are a concern for about 50% of Americans as the COVID-15 health crisis continues. This is particularly true for families and those who have lost income because of the pandemic. For over twenty years, Community Action Marin’s Mental Health program has operated the “Warm Line,” a call in service where trained Peer Support Specialists are available by phone for anyone who feels the need to talk.
The Warm Line is not a counseling service. Instead, people listen, and if callers want feedback, the Peer Support Specialists may make suggestions. All staff are familiar with the services available in Marin County (mental health and other services) so can direct people to places where they can get additional help, whether it is a mental health service, a food bank or affordable child care.
WARM LINE EXTENDED HOURS: ENGLISH SUPPORT
(415) 459-6330
During these stressful times, we recognize the importance of providing extra care, comfort, and support to those with mental health challenges. For this reason, we are extending our peer support Warmline to 9am until midnight, 7 days a week.
COMMUNITY ACTION MARIN LAUNCHES SPANISH LANGUAGE MENTAL HEALTH WARM LINE
(415) 457-4026
On May 4, Community Action Marin launched a Warm Line for Spanish Speakers.  Marin’s Latinx population have been disproportionately economically affected by the restrictions of Shelter in Place as many work in low wage, public-facing jobs that do not offer a “work from home” option. The Warm Line will begin with limited hours; 1PM – 6PM,  Monday to Saturday provided by bilingual staff from Community Action Marin’s Family Partners program.



County of Marin Update:
COVID-19 Update to the Board of Supervisors
In his presentation, Dr. Willis provides a detailed report of case and hospitalization rates for both Marin County and the Bay Area; progress in our COVID-19 vaccination efforts; and a simplified model for knowing when you may be eligible to receive the vaccine.
WATCH ON YOUTUBE
 
 
Healthcare Worker Vaccine Update:  All Tiers of Phase 1A Now Open
Currently, vaccinations are available for healthcare personnel defined in Phase 1A (all tiers) of the state’s framework. Marin County has received an additional allocation of vaccine from the State of California and is now administering 1,000 vaccinations per day.  We are committed to continuing our rapid utilization and distribution of all doses received.
If you are a Phase 1A eligible healthcare worker in Marin County, you are encouraged to pursue a vaccine through one of the following options:

  • If you work in a hospital, you should be vaccinated by the hospital. As long as you regularly work there (at least once per week), you should be vaccinated by the facility. 
  • If you work in a skilled nursing facility, you may be vaccinated on-site at your workplace through a pharmacy partnership.
  • If you are not affiliated with an acute care hospital or skilled nursing facility, but are a healthcare worker or supportive staff, you may be vaccinated at a Marin Public Health vaccination site.
  • If you are a Kaiser Permanente member who is Phase 1A eligible (e.g., healthcare worker), you may book a vaccination appointment at Kaiser San Rafael Medical Center, beginning Friday, January 15.
Learn more about vaccine distribution and when, where and how the general public may be able to be vaccinated on our Vaccine Distribution webpage.
 
New Data Point: Active Cases in Last 14 Days
If you’re a frequent visitor to the Coronavirus.MarinHHS.org homepage or our data and surveillance page, you will notice a new data point. Several members of our community requested a new metric to better track “active” or current cases across Marin County, versus just the cumulative count. Therefore, the former “recovered” data point has been retired and has been replaced with “Cases in the past 14 days.”
 
Update from State: Sacramento Exits from Order; Bay Area Exit Unknown
Today, California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly provided an update on COVID-19 ICU hospitalizations statewide; the State’s response to hospital surge and efforts to provide access to medical professionals and alternative care sites; vaccine rollout; and updates on the Regional Stay Home Order.
WATCH ON YOUTUBE
During the 1:30pm press conference, Dr. Ghaly indicated the Regional Stay Home Order would remain in place for most of the state as ICU capacity is still at or near zero in the affected regions.
The latest ICU capacity numbers by region are:
  • Northern California: 17.6%
  • Bay Area: 4.7%
  • Greater Sacramento: 9.7%
  • San Joaquin Valley: 0%
  • Southern California: 0%
Dr. Ghaly was expected to give four-week projections for regional ICU capacities, but instead said those projections would be shared by Wednesday. Despite Dr. Ghaly’s remarks, Governor Newsom announced at 4:30pm the stay-home order was lifted for the Greater Sacramento region.
ICU capacity projections for regions that are eligible to exit the order are calculated daily based on four factors: current estimated regional ICU capacity available, measure of current community transmission, current regional case rates and the proportion of ICU cases being admitted. Decreasing community transmission and increasing the health system capacity can help a region’s projected ICU capacity so they can exit the order. Read the full Regional Stay Home OrderSupplement to the Order, and frequently asked questions.
 
Vaccine MythBusters: Know the Facts!
It's likely you've heard claims about COVID-19 vaccines on social media or from the people in your life. Knowing what is true about vaccines, and what isn’t, is crucial to community and business recovery. Over the next few days, we’ll bust some myths that exist about the COVID-19 vaccine and share facts that should be shared widely.
️ Fact: The severity of COVID-19 symptoms varies widely and getting vaccinated can help prevent infection with COVID-19. 
Have you heard some exclaim, “COVID-19 isn’t very serious, so I don’t need to get the vaccine!”? Unfortunately, this is not true. While many people with COVID-19 have only a mild illness, others may get a severe illness or die. There is no way to know how COVID-19 will affect you, even if you are not at increased risk of severe complications. COVID-19 vaccination helps protect you by allowing your body to create an antibody response without having to experience sickness. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work
 
Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin supervisor recounts sister’s death by coronavirus
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: January 12, 2021 at 2:31 p.m. | UPDATED: January 13, 2021 at 6:43 a.m.
Traditionally, Marin County supervisors begin the new year talking about their governmental priorities for the coming 12 months.
“But I want to talk today about my family’s New Year’s Day,” Supervisor Judy Arnold said during the supervisors’ meeting on Jan. 5. “My younger sister, Nancy, died on New Year’s Day from COVID.”
Arnold said her sister, who was three years younger than her, and her sister’s husband, Israel Chapa, had just moved from Pennsylvania to live closer to their son, Christian, in Reno, Nev.
They took a flight to Reno on Dec. 1. A couple weeks later, her sister, who was 77 and used a pacemaker, and her brother-in-law became ill.
“I talked to Nancy on FaceTime the night before she got the word it was COVID,” Arnold said. “She was so sick. Apparently, the next day she couldn’t stand up.”
A few days before Christmas, she was admitted to Saint Mary’s Regional Medical Center in Reno. On Christmas Day, she was moved to the hospital’s intensive care unit.
“What was heartbreaking for the family was not being able to see her,” Arnold said. “That is just an awful thing for people. Their loved ones go in and never come out.”
For full article: Marin supervisor recounts sister’s death by coronavirus
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL wants to take a moment to express our heartfelt condolences to Supervisor Arnold, her family, and her community for the tragic loss of her sister. Our thoughts and prayers are with Supervisor Arnold and her family. Marin CIL would also like to express appreciation to Supervisor Arnold for sharing her personal story about the passing of her sister to educate others about the impact of Covid-19 and the importance of following Covid-19 protocols. On a personal note, I have known Judy for many decades. First as a friend of my family and then working with her when she was legislative staff to Senator John Burton (Retired). In her role, she was instrumental in my appointment on a couple different policy boards. As a member of the Board of Supervisors she is strong advocate for people with disabilities and older adults.

Mill Valley equity panel claims official foot-dragging
By LORENZO MOROTTI | lmorotti@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: January 12, 2021 at 6:24 p.m. | UPDATED: January 13, 2021 at 6:44 a.m.
Critics are censuring Mill Valley city officials for alleged inaction on two top recommendations by the racial equity committee.
Members of the committee — formally known as the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Task Force — called into the City Council meeting on Thursday to demand the city make the panel a permanent commission. They also demanded the council allow the committee to lead in the development of a citywide equity plan.
“The council has now pushed the dates back further,” said Naima Dean, co-chair of the committee. “They have not provided guidance and we have not heard from staff or from their working groups.”
Dean said the committee reached out to the city manager asking for clarity on council direction from the Dec. 7 meeting and to determine when the recommendations will return to the council for public discussion.
Dean said the committee reached out to the city manager asking for clarity on council direction from the Dec. 7 meeting and to determine when the recommendations will return to the council for public discussion.
For full article: Mill Valley equity panel claims official foot-dragging

Sharing from Disability Rights California (DRC)

Commending the expansion of investments and services to support people with disabilities.
January 12, 2021
Governor Newsom released his 2021-22 proposed budget on January 8, 2021 (http://www.ebudget.ca.gov/budget/2021-22/#/Home). This budget proposes $227 billion in spending. Despite a global pandemic, the Governor’s budget is positive overall, due in large part to an improved revenue outlook. Not surprising, the budget reflects the realities of COVID-19 and includes a number of measures to address the urgent needs of Californians who have been impacted by the pandemic.
The Governor’s proposed budget builds on important and innovative investments that support persons with disabilities, primarily in the areas of health care expansions and affordability, behavioral health, increased developmental services funding, and housing and homelessness.
Disability Rights California (DRC) applauds the Governor’s investments in education, mental health, and alleviating homelessness. Noteworthy investments include, the appointment of a Senior Advisor on Aging, Disability, and Alzheimer’s as well as significant investments in housing and homelessness, statewide expansion of the Aging and Disability Resource Connections “no wrong door” system, and the creation of a new Office of Medicare Innovation and Integration to strengthen and expand access to care for low and middle-income Californians.
While we appreciate the governor’s ongoing priority to address homelessness, we continue to be concerned about the expanded use of conservatorships to alleviate homelessness. DRC believes fully funding social services and providing housing is the most effective way to end homelessness and we remain committed to defending the civil rights of the homeless population.
DRC applauds the Governor’s urging of the Legislature to extend California’s rent moratorium beyond January 31, 2021. These proposals will particularly help COVID-19-vulnerable segments of the population, including persons with disabilities and older Californians of color, who are disproportionately low-income and rent their homes due to historic and ongoing racism.
An unexpected budget surplus and congressional action have mitigated the need to implement spending cuts. Given the improved revenue outlook, the Governor’s budget proposes to delay by one-year, a number of suspensions that were assumed in the 2020 Budget Act. While we acknowledge the Governor’s efforts to minimize the impact to IHSS and other critical safety-net programs, we are disappointed that the sunset of the IHSS reduction restoration remains.
We look forward to engaging with the Governor and legislature as this proposed budget moves forward in the legislative process.
The following are some of the key items in the budget impacting persons with disabilities and the programs that assist them.
In Relevant Part:
Department of Developmental Services (DDS)
The proposed budget includes $10.5 billion ($6.5 billion General Fund) for the Department and estimates that approximately 386,753 individuals will receive developmental services by the end of 2021-22.
Significant adjustments include:
  • Anticipated costs reflecting the ongoing response to COVID-19 ($265.1 million TF, $183.2 million GF).
  • Extension of the provider supplemental rates and the Uniform Holiday Schedule suspension through December 31, 2022 ($510.5 million TF, $297.0 million GF).
  • Ongoing resources for regional center coordination with state and local entities supporting foster youth ($7.4 million TF, $4.6 million GF).
  • Ongoing resources to support emergency planning and preparation coordination by regional centers ($2 million TF, $1.4 million GF).
  • Additional resources to support community navigators and improve access to generic and regional center services ($5.3 million TF, $3.2 million GF).
  • Full-year implementation of the expanded diversion program services ($4.3 million TF, $2.9 million GF).
Diversity in State Employment
The proposed budget includes $290,000 to establish a Chief Equity Officer within GovOps to implement the work of the California Leads Taskforce, which developed proposals to, among other things, improve the state hiring and retention of people with disabilities.
The Department of Developmental Services and Department of Rehabilitation will continue work to develop a new State Employment Initiative to employ more persons with disabilities in the state workforce. Currently, five departments are part of the pilot program to provide greater employment resources to people with disabilities.

In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS)
The Budget includes $16.5 billion ($5.3 billion General Fund) for the IHSS program in 2021-22, a 10-percent increase in General Fund costs over the revised 2020-21 level. Average monthly caseload in this program is estimated to be 593,000 recipients in 2021-22, a 3.9-percent increase from the revised 2020-21 projection.
Significant adjustments include:
  • $449.8 million General Fund in 2021-22 and $242.6 million General Fund in 2022-23 to reflect a one-year delay in suspending the 7-percent across-the-board reduction to IHSS service hours.
  • $1.2 billion ($557.6 million General Fund) to support projected minimum wage increases to $14 per hour on January 1, 2021 and $15 per hour on January 1, 2022.
  • The Budget no longer assumes savings to hold county administration funding at the 2019-20 level, resulting in county administration costs being updated for 2021-22 to include $17.8 million General Fund to reflect caseload and Consumer Price Index adjustments.
  • $5.3 million one-time General Fund in 2021-22 to extend the back-up provider system and back-up provider wage differential to avoid disruptions to caregiving until December 2021.(included also under aging)
  • The budget includes a reduction of federal funding of $20.7 million in FY 2020-21 and $21.9 million in FY 2021-22 to reflect penalties for noncompliance with federal timelines for meeting Electronic Visit Verification requirements.
Mental Health
The proposed budget focuses on early intervention and mental health services for youth. Cumulatively, Governor Newsom is proposing $400 million for school based mental health programs through the collaboration of Medi-Cal and county providers, and includes continued funding for ACES screening, suicide prevention, and early intervention prevention.
The budget provides:
  • $304.5 million to address the incompetent to stand trial waitlist, including a $233 million demonstration project.
  • $202 million to Residential Mental Health Facilities to repurpose existing state facilities for adult residential facilities.
Mental Health Services Act (Prop 63):
  • $25 million to expand the Mental Health Student Services Act Partnership Grant Program and incentivize inclusion of expenditures for children’s mental health services in county Mental Health Services Act spending plans.
Supplemental Security Income/State Supplemental Program
The budget includes $2.69 billion for the SSI/SSP program, a 0.6 percent decrease from the revised 2020-2021 level. The average monthly caseload is estimated to be 1.18 million recipients in 21-22, a 1.1 percent decrease from the 2020-21 projection.
Effective January 2021, the maximum grant levels are $955 per month for individuals and $1,598 for couples. As a result, the maximum monthly grant levels will increase by approximately $17 and $26 for individuals and couples, effective January 2021.
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL, in collaboration with community members and The California Foundation for Independent Living Centers (Disability Organizing Network), provides feedback and technical assistance relating to California’s budget priorities and proposed legislation impacting people with disabilities and older adults throughout the budget process. To learn more about these efforts and get involved in Marin CIL’s legislative and policy activities please reach out to me at (415) 234-3840 or email peter@marincil.org.
 
Sharing from the SILC
Last September 2020, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced supplemental funding of $165 million for states that currently have Money Follows the Person (MFP) demonstration programs.  In this state, we have the California Community Transitions (CCT) program.  Each state is eligible to submit a proposal to receive up to $5 million of the new funding.  The state Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) will be submitting a funding proposal before the June 30 deadline. 
 
They held a public stakeholder presentation on December 4, 2020 and looks to hold another stakeholder presentation this month.  Please details on their website - MFP Supplemental Funding Opportunity (ca.gov).
What is Money Follows the Person?: The Money Follows the Person (MFP) demonstration—established by Congress through the 2005 Deficit Reduction Act—provides state Medicaid programs the opportunity for older adults and people with disabilities to transition from nursing homes back to home or community-based care settings. 
 
The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

Covid-19 News, Marin's Project Roomkey Ends, Changes in Law with Prop 19, & News from the ARC of CA


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on January 12, 2021

 



Good Morning my Family and Community,
I hope you are doing well this morning. The rooster crowed early this morning so I was up early. Today was a multiple coffee day with extra chocolate and whipped cream. Some days you just need a few extras to start the day. The batphone at the Marin CIL advocacy desk rang early. Lots to do. Wishing everyone the very best today. Here is the PM Morning Report for you. Sending a smile. 


Marin County Update
Marin County COVID-19 Status Update: January 11, 2021
The Marin County COVID-19 Status Update is published daily to share important news and resources related to the COVID-19 pandemic and to keep the local economy running. We remain here for you.
 
Vaccine MythBusters: Know the Facts!
It's likely you've heard claims about COVID-19 vaccines on social media or from the people in your life. Knowing what is true about vaccines, and what isn’t, is crucial to community and business recovery. Over the next few days, we’ll bust some myths that exist about the COVID-19 vaccine and share facts that should be shared widely.
 
❌ MYTH:  I’ve already been diagnosed with COVID-19, so I don’t need to receive the vaccine. 
✔️ Fact: If you have already had COVID-19, there’s evidence that you can still benefit from the vaccine. 
Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19, and because re-infection and transmission to others is possible, people may be advised to get a COVID-19 vaccine even if they have been sick with COVID-19 before. At this time, experts don’t know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. The immunity someone gains from having an infection, called natural immunity, varies from person to person. Some early evidence suggests natural immunity may not last very long. 
 
Sharing from the ARC of California
Planning on Leaving a House to Your Child or Grandchild? Proposition 19, What Persons With Disabilities and Families Need to Know
I am Stephen W. Dale and a board member of the Arc of California as well as the Trustee of the Golden State Pooled Trust and principal attorney at the Dale Law Firm. I want to take a moment and share with our community some changes in the laws concerning leaving property for the benefit of a child or grandchild with a disability, as well as some deadlines that may affect planning options.
On November 3, 2020, California voters approved Proposition 19 which is constitutional amendment that limits who inherit family properties from keeping the low property tax base unless the home is the   primary residence of the transferer and transferee. Proposition 19 also allows homeowners who are over 55 years of age, severely disabled, or victims of a wildfire or natural disaster to transfer their assessed value of their primary home to a newly purchased or newly constructed replacement primary residence up to three times. The new law will make important changes to two existing statewide property tax saving programs:
  1. Limits the parent-and-child transfer and grandparent-to-grandchild transfer exclusions effective 2/16/2021
  2. Expands programs for home transfer by seniors and severely disabled persons effective 4/1/2021
A concern for many parents and grandparents that intend to transfer property to a child or in specific situations a grandchild is that the new rules go into effect February 16th. It is important that parents or grandparents looking to leave real property to their child or grandchild to review these rules and if needed educate themselves whether it is prudent to make property transfers prior to that date.
A good source of information is the Board of Equalization (BOE) at https://www.boe.ca.gov/prop19 which includes the following tables that compare the current law with the pending changes.


Here is a link to a playlist of videos that I have created on with videos on Proposition 19 as well as other videos on housing issues for persons with disabilities. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IaLwIBK4TsI&list=PL5dEwlCC642rxNsNgJN6lU84s-VEb9IxW . another good source of materials is from the BOE which can be found at https://www.boe.ca.gov/serp.htm?q=Proposition+19 .
Families that should seriously review these laws and seek counsel are;
  • Parents (and in limited situations grandparents) that plan on leaving property that is NOT the family residence for the benefit of their child with a disability.
  • Parents (and in limited situations grandparents) that are looking to leave their family residence for the benefit of a child or grandchild where the value of the property is greater than the current tax base, plus$1,000,000.
  • Parents (and in limited situations grandparents) who plan on leaving investment property for the benefit of their child with a disability.
Families should be aware that many estate planning offices are facing challenges right now because of the deadlines, as well as challenges because of COVID. Even so, these issues are very complex so best to talk with your tax and legal advisors to determine what is best for you.
The Arc of California is monitoring issues and welcomes your input. As the BOE makes clear, “At this time, there are still many uncertainties surrounding the implementation of Proposition 19, as the language does not address all issues. These issues will need to be resolved through future legislation. Once this implementing legislation has been enacted, we will issue future guidance on the matter.” https://www.boe.ca.gov/proptaxes/pdf/lta20061.pdf
Stephen W. Dale, LL.M
Trustee – Golden State Pooled Trust www.gspt.org

Major Recent Events
Administrative Transition
 
This past Wednesday, January 6, a group of rioters led an attack on the U.S. Capitol, threatening our government and resulting in damage and multiple fatalities. Our thoughts and support are with those in danger from this attack. Congress, the Administration, and law enforcement must ensure accountability and that no further violence mars the transfer of power to the new Administration. For more, read the statement from the CCD Board of Directors.
 
President Signs COVID Relief, Omnibus Appropriations Bill
 
On December 21, both chambers passed H.R.133, a COVID relief and omnibus appropriations deal. The deal includes $1.4 trillion to fund the federal government through the end of fiscal year 2021 and $900 billion for COVID relief. President Trump signed the bill on December 27.
 
While the bill extends the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) eviction moratorium through the end of January 2021, it unfortunately takes minimal action on The Arc’s key priorities:
 
  • Dedicated funding for Medicaid home and community-based services (HCBS) to serve people with disabilities in their homes and communities and provide better wages and support for the DSP workforce was not included.
  • Personal protective equipment (PPE) for direct support professionals through designation as essential workers was not included.
  • Paid leave and sick days for all caregivers, which was not included in the emergency paid leave provisions. The legislation extended tax credits available for business to cover paid leave but eliminated rules about when business must provide leave and did not extend the tax credits to cover all caregivers as the pandemic continues.
  • Economic impact payments for all people with disabilities. While the bill does include a one-time $600 payment per adult and child under the age of 17, it does not include any payment for dependents who are over the age of 17. This excludes many adults with disabilities who are claimed as dependents.
 
The bill also funds the federal government through September 30, the end of fiscal year 2021. Most of The Arc’s priority programs received level funding or small increases. Programs receiving significant increases include Lifespan Respite Care Act (16.4%), Special Olympics Education Programs (17.9%), and Postsecondary Programs for Students With Intellectual Disabilities (10.2%). Funding levels for The Arc’s priority programs can be found here.
 
President-elect Selects Cabinet Nominees
 
Over the last two months, President-elect Biden announced his choices for cabinet secretaries. Nominees important to disability policy include:
 
  • Attorney General: Merrick Garland, Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
  • Secretary of Education: Miguel Cardona, Education Commissioner of Connecticut
  • Secretary of Health and Human Services: Xavier Becerra, Attorney General of California and former Congressman
  • Secretary of Housing and Urban Development: Representative Marcia Fudge (D-OH)
  • Secretary of Labor: Boston Mayor Marty Walsh
  • Secretary of Transportation: Pete Buttigieg, former Mayor of South Bend, Indiana
 
Hearings will likely begin for each nominee in the coming weeks. A simple majority vote in the Senate is required for confirmation.
 
New Congress Convenes
 
On January 5, the 117th Congress convened for the first time. Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) was re-elected Speaker of the House.
 
Both parties held their leadership elections last year. Democrats re-elected Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-MD) as Majority Leader, Rep. James Clyburn (D-SC) as Majority Whip, and Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) as Caucus Chair. Republicans re-elected Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) as Minority Leader, Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA) as Minority Whip, and Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) as Conference Chair.
 
The following were selected as committee chairs and ranking members, respectively:
 
  • Appropriations: Rep. David Scott (D-GA) and Rep. Kay Granger (R-TX)
  • Education and Labor: Rep. John Yarmuth (D-KY) and Rep. Virginia Foxx (R-NC)
  • Energy and Commerce: Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ) and Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA)
  • Judiciary: Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NJ) and Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH)
  • Ways and Means: Rep. Richard Neal (D-MA) and Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX)
 
On the Senate side, Republicans re-elected Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) as Majority Leader, Sen. John Thune (R-SD) as Majority Whip, and Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY) as Republican Conference Chair. Similarly, Senate Democrats re-elected Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) as Minority Leader, Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) as Minority Whip, and Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA) as Assistant Minority Leader. Republicans currently hold a majority of 51-48. As a result of the January 5 run-off election in Georgia, this balance will change to 50-50 once Georgia's Senators-elect are sworn in. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris will have the power to cast a tie-breaking vote. We expect the Senate to establish new rules and conduct new elections following the swearing in of the Senators from Georgia.
Source: ARC Capitol Insider

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin won’t revive hotel program for homeless
By MATTHEW PERA | mpera@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: January 11, 2021 at 3:11 p.m. | UPDATED: January 12, 2021 at 6:41 a.m.
By the time the federal government had agreed to extend funding indefinitely for California’s Project Roomkey, Marin County had already moved most of the homeless residents in the program out of the hotel rooms where they had been isolating.
County officials said despite the new federal funding agreement, which was announced in December, the county does not plan to bring those homeless residents back into hotel rooms.
Aimed at providing space for the homeless to shelter in isolation during the coronavirus pandemic, the program required participating counties to reapply each month for funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which then reimbursed counties for 75% of the cost. The uncertainty of the federal funding led some counties, including Marin, to pare back or close the hotel program as the pandemic dragged on.
For full Article: Marin won’t revive hotel program for homeless
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL provides important safety-net services and advocacy support for people with disabilities and older adults. One of the most frequently requested services is housing support. This includes housing retention and advocacy. Marin CIL together with community members and our  community partners Legal Aid of Marin, Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California, California Alliance for Retired Americans (CARA), Marin Community Action Team (Marin CAT), Marin Environmental Housing Collaborative, and the Marin Aging Action Initiative have been working collaboratively to support various housing sustainability initiatives including Fair Housing ordinances, rental protections, and both Project Roomkey and Project Homekey programs. On a personal note homelessness affects every community and many families including my own. It makes me sad that the County of Marin decided not to move forward with Project Roomkey.

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Covid19 Updates, Senator Mike McGuire Hosting Upcoming Housing Forum, Q & A Re: Covid Vaccine & More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on January 11, 2021

Good Morning my Wonderful  Family and Community,
This past Saturday, Jennifer and I took a road trip to Marin, where I received my first shot of the Moderna Covid vaccine!
Through my work at Marin CIL, I am an essential worker. I want to express my appreciation to everyone who is supporting vaccine distribution locally and nationally. I appreciate the team at Marin County Fire, the Medical Reserve Corps, and Marin Public Health, and everyone who is protecting the health and welfare of our communities.

Minimum side effects yesterday, some minor muscle pain, like when you work out too hard. (YES I do work out!) Today I am feeling a little tired and still have some minor soreness (like a flu shot) but I am ok. No fevers, no chills, etc. All is good.

While I was there at the vaccine location, I went into work mode and did a little technical assistance at the request of the folks at the site. Everyone always laughs because I never seem to stop working. You know what they say….duty calls!
I think getting the vaccine is important. I weighed the potential side effects against what could happen if I got Covid, and it was clear to me vaccination was the best way. I am protecting my family, my friends, my community and everyone I care about.

Even when you are vaccinated you will still have to wear a mask and practice social distancing, but baby steps toward a brighter future.

Here's to a kinder, gentler 2021 after a difficult week for our country. Sending each of you a virtual smile today!

County of Marin Update
Marin County COVID-19 Status Update: January 10, 2021
The Marin County COVID-19 Status Update is published daily to share important news and resources related to the COVID-19 pandemic and to keep the local economy running. We remain here for you.
 
Vaccine Update: Healthcare Worker Vaccinations Continue
Vaccine operations are in full swing to provide much needed vaccinations to frontline health care workers. Marin Public Health’s vaccine clinic (also referred to as a “Point of Dispensing”) has averaged approximately 800 vaccinations per day over the past two days and will expand this next week as more doses become available.  In addition, Marin Public Health requested additional doses from the State of California beyond our normal allocation because of our rapid utilization and successful distribution of doses we’ve received so far.
Marin Public Health is prioritizing vaccination distribution as defined by the California Department of Public Health. Currently, vaccinations are limited to frontline healthcare personnel, as defined in Tiers 1 & 2 of Phase 1A of the state’s framework.
 
Vaccine MythBusters: Know the Facts!
It's likely you've heard claims about COVID-19 vaccines on social media or from the people in your life. Knowing what is true about vaccines, and what isn’t, is crucial to community and business recovery. Over the next few days, we’ll bust some myths that exist about the COVID-19 vaccine and share facts that should be shared widely.
✔️ Fact: Less Than 0.5% Experience Severe Vaccine Side Effects 
In the same trials, vaccines resulted in side effects that were generally mild to moderate and lasted no more than a couple of days. Symptoms included irritation at the injection point of the arm, chills, fatigue, muscle soreness and fever. Less than 0.5% of trial participants experienced severe symptoms as an allergic reaction to the vaccines. Remember, these symptoms are normal for any vaccine and are a sign that the body is building immunity. 
 
 

Sharing from SCDD
 The Facts About COVID-19 Vaccines for Direct Support Professionals VIDEO
The NADSP has produced a fifteen minute webinar specifically for direct support professionals about the COVID-19 vaccine with our National Medical Advisor, Dr. Rick Rader. As you can imagine, we’ve had many requests for something like this because of a growing hesitance from the workforce to get vaccinated early. Please feel encouraged to share it widely with those in your membership and networks. We hope that the information provided by Dr. Rader in this webinar will give DSPs confidence in getting the vaccine and to help the people they support to also understand that the vaccine is safe, well-tested and necessary.

Sharing from the National Low Income Housing Coalition
Join today’s (January 11) national call on coronavirus, disasters, housing, and homelessness at 2:30-4 pm ET (11:30 am-1 pm PST). We will hear from Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH), the incoming chairman of the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee; discuss the latest actions and updates on the extended eviction moratorium and emergency rental assistance (ERA) program; hear about our new publication on best practices for local ERA programs; learn about an accommodation request letter generator for people with disabilities facing eviction for nonpayment of rent; receive updates from the field; and more. Register for the call at: https://tinyurl.com/ru73qan
 
 
Sharing from the National Council on Independent Living
NCIL Executive Director Kelly Buckland to Retire in 2021 
Dear NCIL Members, Staff & Friends,
First I hope that you are all well in these very trying and turbulent times. This is one of the hardest statements I've ever had to write. I am writing to share the news of my intention to retire as Executive Director of the National Council on Independent Living (NCIL) on May 14, 2021. While I am looking forward to a new chapter in my life, I am going to miss my work as Executive Director very much! Especially, working with the hard working and dedicated NCIL employee family! Working as the Executive Director of NCIL has been one of the greatest honors of my life. I want to thank all of you humbly for allowing me this honor and for all of your support throughout the years!

This is a very important transition for NCIL and me. I have already shared my plans with NCIL’s Governing Board and staff and we have already begun implementing NCIL’s succession plan. I am confident that NCIL’s Governing Board and Executive Committee will ensure that the transition is smooth and that my replacement will be an exceptional leader and advocate for people with disabilities and independent living. We will be releasing the NCIL Executive Director position announcement and instructions on how to apply very soon. 
Again, I am thankful for the time I have been able to serve NCIL, but also very proud of what we have accomplished together. Before I joined NCIL as Executive Director in May of 2009, I served on NCIL’s Governing Board as President, Vice-President and before that Regional Representative for Region X. NCIL and the Independent Living movement are very dear to me and I have spent most of my adult life working in and trying to grow our movement and make it better. I would like to highlight some of the accomplishments we have achieved together while I’ve been Executive Director:
  • Nearly doubled NCIL’s budget to a $2 million per year organization that is in a sound financial position. 
  • Reauthorized the Rehab Act and established the Independent Living Administration, an accomplishment many thought we could not achieve.
  • Passed-through nearly 1 million dollars from NCIL’s grants and projects to member CILs and SILCs in grants and subcontract work. 
  • Played a major and decisive role in defeating the efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act.
  • Established the Fifth Core Service of transition and diversion.
  • Increased the Independent Living Annual Federal Budget by approximately 15 million dollars.
  • Obtained 85 million dollars in COVID-19 relief funding for CILs.
  • Established an internship program and substantially increased the participation of youth in NCIL.
  • Obtained prominent office space and established a major presence in the nation's capital.
  • Increased staff benefits and brought a high turnover rate down to almost zero.
We have accomplished much, but we still have substantial challenges ahead of us. We need to address the systemic racism in our movement and I know we can. We need to do this work together and stay committed. We need to demand that people have a right to live in the community, eliminate the institutional bias and keep people from being sent to congregate settings in the first place. We also need to restore the damage that has been done to our movement by the Administration for Community Living (ACL) and continue to work on increasing our presence and our prominence within the administration. And many other very important issues affecting the rights and independence of people with disabilities.
I know that NCIL will continue to do great things and continue to be a leader in the future. I am excited to see what the future holds for NCIL and my retirement does not mean that I’m leaving independent living. I look forward to remaining involved as an individual member of NCIL and will continue to support NCIL to the best of my ability. Again, I thank you all for your support in our work together and I hope you will also remain involved and support NCIL going forward.  
A Tidbit about NCIL: The National Council on Independent Living is the longest-running national cross-disability, grassroots organization run by and for people with disabilities. Founded in 1982, NCIL represents thousands of organizations and individuals including: individuals with disabilities, Centers for Independent Living (CILs), Statewide Independent Living Councils (SILCs), and other organizations that advocate for the human and civil rights of people with disabilities throughout the United States.
 
 
 
Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
 
 
 
Marin seeks guidance on order to accept coronavirus patients
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: January 10, 2021 at 12:55 p.m. | UPDATED: January 10, 2021 at 1:38 p.m.
Marin County’s public health officer said he is trying to get more details on a state order that counties with adequate intensive care unit capacity accept coronavirus patients from overwhelmed regions.
“We’re seeking clarification on where the authority lies to require us to accommodate patients from outside the region and what ICU capacity would be used to determine our ability,” Dr. Matt Willis said Friday.
The California Department of Public Health did not respond to a request for comment.
Under the order, an overwhelmed hospital may seek a mandatory transfer if it has “reached crisis care and does not have the ability to examine and treat patients.”
The order states that crisis care occurs “when resources are scarce and the focus changes from delivering individual patient care to delivering the best care for the patient population.”
In a released statement, Tomás Aragon, California’s public health director, said, “When hospitals are overwhelmed and overflowing, they are no longer able to provide the traditional standards of care we expect, but if health care resources are available elsewhere, we should ensure Californians can receive appropriate care.”
On Friday, both the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California regions were reporting 0% intensive care unit bed capacity. The Bay Area’s IUC bed capacity stood at 3%. The Sacramento region’s ICU capacity was at 6.4%, and the Northern California region had the highest capacity at 27.5%.
Marin reported ICU bed capacity of 5% on Friday; 20 of the county’s 21 ICU beds that were deemed to be functionally staffed that day were occupied.
For Full Article: Marin seeks guidance on order to accept coronavirus patients

Sharing from CDCAN
COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions
January 8, 2021


Californians have made extraordinary sacrifices to help slow the spread of COVID-19.
Help is on the way as the State begins its rollout of safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines. California’s vaccine efforts are led by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). These FAQs provide general information about the vaccine and will be updated as additional information becomes available.


Has California received COVID-19 vaccines?
DDS: Yes. California has started to receive shipments of COVID-19 vaccines made by PfizerBioNTech and Moderna. The federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reviewing additional potential vaccines for possible approval.

What information is available about the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines?
DDS: The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine has received authorization for use on people 16 years and older. There are two doses given 21 days apart. It is 95 percent effective against COVID-19 one week after the second dose. The Moderna vaccine has received authorization for use on people 18 years and older. There are two doses given 28 days apart. It is 94 percent effective against COVID-19 two weeks after the second dose.

What are the benefits of being vaccinated?
DDS: COVID-19 vaccines are meant to prevent you from getting COVID-19. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that getting a COVID-19 vaccine also may help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19.

Can the vaccine give me COVID-19?
DDS: No. The currently authorized COVID-19 vaccines do not contain live COVID-19 virus. The vaccines therefore cannot make you sick with COVID-19. The goal of the vaccines is to teach our immune systems how to fight the virus that causes COVID-19. COVID19 vaccines also will not cause you to test positive on COVID-19 viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current COVID-19 infection.

Are the COVID-19 vaccines safe?
DDS: Yes. The vaccines have received an emergency authorization use from the FDA. In addition, California has its own Scientific Safety Review Workgroup. The expert members of this Workgroup have confirmed that the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines have met high standards for safety and efficacy.
Additional information about vaccine safety may be found on the CDC’s website:
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety.html


Do the vaccines have any side effects?
DDS: Any vaccine sometimes can cause a sore arm, aches, fatigue or fever for a few days after getting the vaccine, but these temporary effects are not harmful. However, the CDC indicates that some individuals should not receive the vaccine. You may find more information about the CDC guidance here:
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/allergic-reaction.html
If you any questions or concerns about side effects, allergic reactions, and/or other questions, please discuss them with your health care provider before receiving a COVID-19 vaccine.


Who will be vaccinated first?
DDS: In early December 2020, CDPH [California Department of Public Health] issued its initial vaccine distribution plan. California’s Vaccine Plan breaks the distribution of the vaccine into three phases: Phase 1a, 1b, and 1c. There are tiers within each phase, as explained below. These Phase guidelines may be found here:
  • https://covid19.ca.gov/vaccines
  • https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/CDPH-Allocation-Guidelines-for-COVID-19-Vaccine-During-Phase-1A-Recommendations.aspx
The priorities for vaccines in Phase 1a are:
  1) Healthcare workers and long-term care staff who are most likely to be exposed to COVID-19 through direct or indirect contact with patients or residents; and
  2) Residents of long-term care settings because they are more likely to be hospitalized or die from COVID-19.
Health care and long-term care facilities include: acute care, psychiatric and correctional facility hospitals and skilled nursing facilities, assisted living facilities, and similar settings for older or medically vulnerable individuals. Regional center consumers who live in licensed long-term care facilities and the staff who have direct or indirect contact
with residents of those facilities are in the first priority, Phase 1a, vaccination group.
This includes individuals living in Skilled Nursing Facilities, Intermediate Care Facilities, Adult Residential Facilities for Persons with Special Health Care Needs (ARFPSHN) and other licensed residential facilities.
In making decisions about the guidelines for Phase 1b and 1c, CDPH [California Department of Public Health] is consulting with a group of experts, the Drafting Guidelines Workgroup, and a group of community representatives, the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee, to make sure vaccines are prioritized fairly.
After healthcare workers and long-term care residents, the next people to be vaccinated will be individuals who have higher risk for severe disease or death (due to age or other factors), who are unable to work at home, who live or work in geographic areas that have been highly impacted, or who are most likely to spread disease to other workers or to the public. 
Later in 2021, most Californians will have an opportunity to get vaccinated.
More information about the priorities for vaccine administration may be found here:

https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/COVID-19Vaccine.aspx

When can I be vaccinated?
DDS: California is working closely with community partners and stakeholders to help guide the planning process and ensure the vaccine is distributed and administered equitably.
California is committed to a fair and equitable allocation and distribution process. No one should bypass the established vaccine allocation and distribution process.
County health departments are responsible for administering the COVID-19 vaccine consistent with the State’s priorities. Because the number of health care providers and the number of long-term care facilities will vary from county, the timing for vaccination administration in each county also may vary. Regional centers are working with county health officials about local plans to vaccinate consumers and staff who live or work in long-term care facilities. If you have questions about those plans, please contact your regional center.


When can providers serving regional center consumers receive the vaccine?
DDS: Many providers who work in long-term care facilities will be covered in Phase 1a of the vaccine administration. Tier 1 of this phase includes: acute care, psychiatric hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, assisted living facilities, and similar settings for older or medically vulnerable individuals. As noted above, included in the category of “long-term care facilities” are residential facilities serving regional center consumers, including:

  ARFPSHN [Adult Residential Facilities for Persons with Special Health Care Needs], Enhanced Behavioral Supports Homes, and other licensed residential facilities.

  Phase 1a, Tier 2 for vaccine administration includes staff and residents of the following:
  • Intermediate care facilities for persons who need non-continuous nursing supervision and supportive care and other licensed adult residential facilities.

  Phase 1a, Tier 2 for vaccine administration also includes the following community health workers:
  • Home health care and in-home supportive services
  • Community health workers, including promotoras
  • Supported living services
  • Family Home Agencies and contractors
  • Congregate Living Health Facilities
  • Individuals providing in-home services such as respite workers, applied behavioral analysis providers, staff providing independent living skills training, and staff providing Early Start services 


Are staff who work through a supported living service provider eligible for vaccination?
DDS: Yes, staff who work through a supported living services provider are included as community health care workers.

Will any regional center staff receive vaccines during this phase?
DDS: Regional center staff who have direct contact with residents in long-term care facilities to conduct monitoring and quality assurance will receive the vaccine during Phase 1a, Tier 2. Each regional center will identify eligible staff.

Is the vaccine mandatory?
DDS: No, there is no mandatory vaccination requirement from either the state or federal government. While vaccine doses will be limited in supply at first, we hope that by educating Californians about the safety and efficacy of a COVID-19 vaccine, we can encourage voluntary adoption of the vaccine.

Is consent required to receive the vaccine?
DDS: Yes, consent is required to receive the vaccine.

Who can give consent for regional center consumers?
DDS: Consent for regional center consumers is given by the individual who can make medical decisions. This may include:
  • An adult regional center consumer. Most consumers have the right and ability to make their own decisions about medical care. Consumers should be provided with needed disability-related accommodations. The consumer may ask for help from a family member or other individual they trust. This is sometimes called supported decision making. Under state law (Welfare & Institutions Code §4541(a)(1-3)), the State Council on Developmental Disabilities may, if the consumer requests, appoint an authorized representative to help the individual make decisions. A request for an authorized representative can be made through council@scdd.ca.gov
  • Parents or legal guardians of minor children.
  • Individuals authorized to make decisions under a Durable Power of Attorney for Healthcare.
  • Conservators of adults, if the court’s conservatorship order gives the conservator the right to make medical treatment decisions.
  • In limited circumstances, a regional center executive director or designee when the consumer does not have the capacity to consent and there is not another person authorized to make decisions.


Is there a cost to receive the vaccine?
DDS: Vaccines are available at no cost. Vaccines purchased with U.S. taxpayer dollars will be given to the American people at no cost. 

After I receive the vaccine, do I need to wear a mask and follow other safety protocols?
DDS: Yes. Vaccinated individuals should keep wearing masks, washing hands and maintaining social distancing of six feet from other people until the vaccine has been widely administered.

How is my privacy protected if I receive a vaccine?
DDS: California law strictly limits how personal information about those who are vaccinated can be shared. California negotiated with the federal government to limit the required data sharing only to information that will not allow an individual to be identified.

Where can I find other information about the COVID-19 Vaccine?
DDS: CDPH [California Department of Public Health] is leading California’s vaccine efforts. Information about vaccines may be found on CDPH’s [California Department of Public Health's] website:
  • https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/COVID-19Vaccine.aspx
  • https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/CDPH-Allocation-Guidelines-for-COVID-19-Vaccine-During-Phase-1A-Recommendations.aspx
The CDC is coordinating federal information about the vaccine. Information about vaccines may be found on CDC’s website:
  https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/faq.html


Will the Department of Developmental Services provide additional information regarding vaccinations?
DDS: Yes, as more information is available, the Department will update these FAQs on our website, at this link: https://www.dds.ca.gov/corona-virus-information-and-resources/frequently-asked-questions/
CDCAN NOTE: To receive the free CDCAN Reports, send email request, with "Subscribe CDCAN" in the subject line, to Marty Omoto athttp://martyomoto@att.net

Sharing from the California Department of Aging
2021-22 Governor’s Budget: Investments for Aging
In relevant part:
Targeted New Investments for Aging Well Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) [$7.5 million in 2021-22; $10 million in 2022-23] The Governor’s Proposed 2021-22 Budget includes $7.5 million in 2021-22 and $10 million in 2022-23 for the statewide expansion of the State’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) program, also known as “No Wrong Door,” which was a key recommendation of both the Master Plan for Aging Stakeholder Advisory Committee and the Task Force on Alzheimer’s. The ADRC program is the State’s only coordinated “one stop” telephone and on-line access which enables a single point of entry for older adults and people with disabilities, regardless of age, income, or disability, to navigate their local systems of long-term services and supports. ADRC programs provide warm hand-off information and referral/assistance services, person-centered options counseling, short-term service coordination during times of crisis, and transition services from hospitals to home and from skilled nursing facilities back into the community. There are 1 2021-22 Governor’s Budget Investments for Aging currently 6 designated and 10 emerging ADRC programs in the state and this funding will enable the establishment of ADRC programs throughout the State. ADRC funding is potentially subject to suspension 12/31/22 dependent upon the economic conditions of that state at that time.
IHSS COVID-19 Back-Up Provider System [$5.3 million GF one-time] The Budget includes $5.3 million one-time General Fund int 2021-22 to extend the back-up provider wage differential to avoid disruptions to caregiving until December 2021. The Administration will evaluate the need of an IHSS provider back-up system for severely impaired individuals as the state recovers from the effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic.
For full report: 2021-22 Governor’s Budget: Investments for Aging

Sharing from the Marin Organizing Committee
You're invited to join us for a Housing Forum with California State Senator Mike McGuire. We're starting the year off right with a conversation about upcoming state legislation and the 2021 housing package, the state of housing in Marin County, the RHNA process, homelessness, housing and population trends for the North Bay, and how housing advocates can be supportive locally and statewide to address our housing crisis. Register at https://tinyurl.com/housingforum-mcguire.

When: Wednesday, January 13, 2021, at 5:00 - 6:00 pm
Where: Zoom (register to receive a link to join)
 
A Tidbit about the Marin Organizing Committee: The Bay Area IAF is an affiliate of the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF), the nation’s oldest and largest leadership development and organizing network. The IAF bases its work on the idea that a healthy democracy requires the active participation of ordinary people. The Bay Area IAF is a broad-based network of local institutions—faith-based, non-profit, educational, labor, and civic organizations—that come together to develop leaders, identify shared issues affecting our communities, and take action around these issues. Member institutions pay dues to ensure that Bay Area IAF has a secure and independent core budget, and is primarily accountable to its own constituents. The Bay Area IAF is strictly non-partisan and is multi-issue. Our member institutions work together to develop our local agendas by engaging constituents, both within and across our institutions, in conversations about the issues affecting their families, neighborhoods and communities. MOC is currently working on multiple issues, including protections for renters in Marin, affordable housing, quality of life for older adults, and mental healthcare in schools. Past issues have included access to health care, housing-focused shelter and neighborhood safety. 

 

Stakeholder Call Regarding CAHHS Budget, Housing, Stay-at Home Anticipated to be Extended, and More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on January 8, 2021

Good Morning my Exceptional Family and Community,
I hope you are all doing well today. This week has been challenging for all of us. I wanted to take a moment to encourage each of you to remember to practice self-care. Remember you are valued and cared for. Below is the PM Morning Report for you. Sending you a smile.

Marin County Update
Extension of Stay-Home Order is Anticipated
With a regional COVID-19 sheltering order set to expire January 8, Marin County Public Health officials are expecting the State of California to issue an indefinite extension of restrictions intended to slow the spread of the virus that has led to 115 Marin deaths.
Due to dwindling intensive care unit (ICU) capacity at hospitals across the region, the state implemented a stay-home order for the Bay Area region, which includes Marin, on December 17 for a minimum of three weeks. The stay-home order will be lifted once the region’s ICU capacity forecast meets or exceeds 15%.
The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) ICU capacity projections are based on four factors:

  • estimated regional ICU capacity available
  • measure of current community transmission
  • current regional case rates
  • the proportion of cases being admitted to the ICU
“As case rates increase, ICU capacity decreases, and the numbers are still moving in the wrong direction,” said Dr. Matt Willis, the County’s Public Health Officer. “The Bay Area is down to 4% ICU capacity, the lowest it’s ever been. We feel it’s best to inform our communities that the stay-home order likely will remain in place until we reverse the trend across the region. We can all do our part to reopen our community by sticking to the stay-home order and preventing new infections.” 
 
TOMORROW: Virtual Town Hall to discuss Vaccines and Stay Home Order
Join us on Friday, January 8 at 2:00pm for another “Community Conversation” event featuring Dr. Matt Willis and Dr. Tyler Evans. Our discussion will reveal the status of the Regional Stay Home Order and give an update on Marin County’s progress with COVID-19 vaccine distribution. The panel discussion will be followed by Q&A. Spanish interpretation will be provided via Zoom.
Watch/Listen via Zoom: zoom.us/join or call (669) 900-6833
Meeting ID: 956 2661 1169 Attendee ID: # Password: 074775
Watch live via County of Marin Facebook
 
Vaccine MythBusters: Know the Facts!
It's likely you've heard claims about COVID-19 vaccines on social media or from the people in your life. Knowing what is true about vaccines, and what isn’t, is crucial to community and business recovery. Over the next few days, we’ll bust some myths that exist about the COVID-19 vaccine and share facts that should be shared widely.
️ Fact: Vaccine injections do NOT contain tracking microchips 
No vaccine injections or nasal sprays – including shots for COVID-19 – contain microchips, nanochips, RFID trackers or devices that would track or control your body in any way. Shipments of vaccine doses are monitored as they are shipped and administered across the country but the notion that these shots will contain tracking devices implanted into people is false. 
 
Board of Supervisors to Consider New Eviction Moratorium through June 30 for tenants affected by COVID-19
After implementing eviction protections for residents during the during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Marin County Board of Supervisors will consider adopting a resolution that continues to bar evictions through June for people economically impacted by the coronavirus.
The Board will discuss the resolution, drafted by the Marin County Community Development Agency (CDA), during its online session at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, January 12. Planners worked with the Board’s Housing Subcommittee to create language that reinstates a local moratorium first enacted March 24, 2020, when households began to suffer negative financial impacts directly tied to the pandemic. The moratorium was extended four times.
If the new resolution is approved, landlords will be prohibited from evicting a tenant through June 30 if the tenant has an economic hardship that is directly tied to COVID-19.
The local resolution expired on September 30, and the County deferred to the State of California’s Assembly Bill 3088, which provides relief through January 31 for tenants who submit a declaration form and pay 25% of rent owed between September 2020 and January 2021. Under AB 3088, rent that came due between March and August 2020, still due to landlords, was converted to consumer debt and could not be used as the basis for evictions.
Continue reading the news release for more information about the proposed resolution and how to participate in the upcoming board meeting. Or, visit CDA’s Landlord and Renters Resources webpage for more details about the emergency rental assistance program and AB3088.
 

Sharing from California Health and Human Services
Please join California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly and Department Directors on a stakeholder conference call Friday at 3:00 p.m. to discuss Governor Gavin Newsom's 2021-2022 Budget.
 Friday, January 8, 2021
Time:  3:00 P.M. Pacific Time*
Call-In Number: 844-291-6362
Access Code: 6200297
A Tidbit form me:  As part of this Stakeholder conversation hosted by HHS Secretary Ghaly; I anticipate time for questions and answers relating to the Governor’s budget for Health and Human Services Programs.
 

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin legislator’s bond push among 2021 housing initiatives
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: January 7, 2021 at 2:43 p.m. | UPDATED: January 7, 2021 at 4:32 p.m.
State Sen. Mike McGuire, whose district includes Marin, said he will partner with Senate President Pro Tem Toni Atkins to get a statewide bond measure on the ballot to raise money for affordable housing.
“My major priority is getting an affordable housing bond passed in 2021,” said McGuire, D-Healdsburg. “The pandemic has made our affordable housing crisis even worse. Between 2015 and 2025, California will need 1.5 million affordable rental housing units just to keep up with demand.”
The effort is just one of the legislative initiatives on housing expected in the new year.
In December, Senate leaders submitted six bills that would make it easier to build homes and smaller apartments, and to subdivide large residential lots into two parcels. Many of the bills are reintroductions of measures that won support during the last session, but got stalled in a legislative calendar shortened by the pandemic and intraparty political disputes.
For full article: Marin legislator’s bond push among 2021 housing initiatives
A Tidbit from Me:  As I mentioned previously, Marin CIL’s core services include housing preservation, retention, and advocacy. Whether you are looking for housing or need support with housing retention or advocacy or to learn more about your rights Marin CIL is here for you! If you are a person with a disability or older adult please reach out to us.

Sharing from the National Council on Independent Living
Information Alert: Disability EmpowHer Network Announces Mentoring & Leadership Training Opportunities for Girls & Young Women with Disabilities
January 6, 2021 By theadvocacymonitor Leave a Comment
Source: Disability EmpowHer Network
Disability EmpowHer Network is excited to announce two mentoring and leadership training opportunities for girls and young women with disabilities across the nation: EmpowHer Camp and A Letter from a Role Model.

EmpowHer Camp is a multi-stage skill-building, empowerment, and mentoring program that brings a diverse group of girls with disabilities (ages 13 -17) to camp with successful disabled women mentors in the Adirondacks for one week to learn about disaster preparedness and basic survival skills, while also developing independent living and leadership skills. The girls will be invited to Washington, D.C. the next summer for a reunion trip to explore how they have grown as leaders, meet with leaders in emergency management and the Disability Community, and meet with Congress to discuss inclusive disaster preparedness. During the year between the first trip and the reunion trip, the girls will create a yearlong local project involving inclusive disaster strategies.
A Letter from a Role Model is our introductory mentoring initiative that matches girls with disabilities (ages 8 -18) with a successful disabled woman to write them a letter of encouragement! Adults can nominate a disabled girl to receive a letter from a mentor or she can nominate herself by telling us about her background, interests, and struggles. Disability EmpowHer Network then matches her with a successful disabled woman who will write a letter sharing her own struggles and successes, and plenty of words of wisdom!
To learn more about our programs please visit disabilityempowhernetwork.org. To nominate a girl with a disability to receive a letter or to attend EmpowHer Camp, visit disabilityempowhernetwork.org/get-a-mentor.
Source: Information Alert: Disability EmpowHer Network Announces Mentoring & Leadership Training Opportunities for Girls & Young Women with Disabilities

Sharing from The CIL
The 5th Annual Ed Roberts Awards is here, and for the first time ever, completely free!

This year, we’ll be honoring five individuals - Dr. Kara Ayers, Dr. Megan Kirshbaum, Brandon Young, Joe Xavier, and Martin Paley - whose work has increased awareness, collaboration, and opportunity among parents with disabilities, parents of children with disabilities, and our community as a whole.

This year's Ed Roberts Awards will be held virtually on January 23, 2021 at 6 PM PST. We’ve partnered with a local media company to create an awesome production that will recognize and honor each of these individuals for the major contributions they’ve made in our community.

The ceremony will be hosted on Zoom. You can register to join us here:
 
 
REGISTER NOW!
 
And for those who are able to pitch in and make a donation, know that we won’t leave you empty-handed. We came up with a plan to both help some of our favorite local foodmakers and restaurants, struggling to stay afloat in the age of COVID, and provide you with a delicious, memorable experience.

In place of the typical Ed Roberts Awards catered meal, donors to TheCIL can receive gift cards to some of our favorite local restaurants, as well as a gift basket loaded with 100% local foods, drinks, and treats. It’s been a tough year, and while everyone here at TheCIL agrees that we’d rather see your smiling faces here in person, sitting down to watch the ceremony next to a plate of wood-grilled carne asada from Comal, a bowl of piping-hot Shoyu ramen from Ramen Shop, or a platter of VooDoo Shrimp from Angeline’s Louisiana Kitchen is a pretty good substitute. All proceeds will go towards converting TheCIL’s services from physical to digital, and making sure that everyone in our community has access to technology that will connect them to their jobs, their schools, and their families.
We’re overjoyed for another chance to bring our community together and keep Ed Roberts’ memory alive. We can’t wait to see you there.
Cheers,
TheCIL
 
REGISTER NOW!
Source: 5th Annual Ed Robert's Awards

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Marin Covid 19 Update, Capitol Protest, MPA Released, Governor Announces $600 Tax Credit, & More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on January 7, 2021

Good Morning my Valued Family and Community,
I hope you all are doing well this morning. As I am writing to you today, I can’t help but reflect on recent events. The challenges to our democracy that have been taking place, including the events at the U.S. Capitol, remind us once again of the importance of coming together to work for a better world. The Independent Living and the overarching Disability Rights movement must continue to work to abolish racism, ableism, sexism, and ageism even in our own systems and communities. Everyone has a right to be treated with dignity and respect. We must continue to lift up marginalized communities. We must speak out against all acts of violence and hate speech. While there are always differences around ideology, we must come together. Here’s the PM report for you today. Sending a virtual smile to each of you.

Marin County Update
Progress continues with vaccinating frontline healthcare workers  
Marin County’s COVID-19 vaccination distribution began Wednesday, December 16 and has continued throughout the past three weeks. Today, Marin Public Health launched a vaccine clinic for staff of residential care facilities for the elderly, dialysis, hospice and home health care. This signals the launch of Tier 2 within Phase 1A of the vaccine prioritization framework set forth by the California Department of Public Health.
By the end of this week, nearly 12,000 doses will have been distributed to frontline health care workers in Marin. Marin Public Health hopes to complete Phase 1A by the end of the month but will need more vaccine supply from the State to achieve this goal.  
Related Links:

 
THIS FRIDAY: Virtual Town Hall to discuss Vaccines and Stay Home Order
Join us on Friday, January 8 at 2:00pm for another “Community Conversation” event featuring Dr. Matt Willis and Dr. Tyler Evans. Our discussion will reveal the status of the Regional Stay Home Order and give an update on Marin County’s progress with COVID-19 vaccine distribution. The panel discussion will be followed by Q&A.
Watch/Listen via Zoom: zoom.us/join or call (669) 900-6833
Meeting ID: 956 2661 1169 Attendee ID: # Password: 074775
Or, watch live via County of Marin Facebook
 
 
Vaccine MythBusters: Know the Facts!
It's likely you've heard claims about COVID-19 vaccines on social media or from the people in your life. Knowing what is true about vaccines, and what isn’t, is crucial to community and business recovery. Over the next few days, we’ll bust some myths that exist about the COVID-19 vaccine and share facts that should be shared widely.
 
️ Fact: The COVID-19 Vaccine Will NOT Give You COVID-19  
It is impossible for someone to develop COVID-19 through the vaccine injection since the vaccines do not contain the virus. The goal for COVID-19 vaccines is to teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause side effects, such as fatigue, headache, soreness or redness at the injection site, and muscle or joint pain. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building immunity. 
 


Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Newsom proposes $600 pandemic relief for low earners
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: January 6, 2021 at 5:41 p.m. | UPDATED: January 7, 2021 at 6:42 a.m.
Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Wednesday that he wants to give low-income Californians a $600 tax credit to augment the federal pandemic relief.
If approved by state lawmakers, the plan would give a $600 payment to California residents who qualified for the state earned income tax credit on their 2019 tax returns. Generally, California tax filers who earn less than $30,000 a year are eligible for that credit. Last year 3.9 million California returns applied for the credit.
Newsom said he will also propose extending the state’s eviction moratorium, which expires on Jan. 31.
Newsom unveiled the proposal for a “Golden State stimulus” during a video press conference Wednesday morning. One of the featured speakers during the briefing was Marin’s state senator, Mike McGuire.
For full Article: Newsom proposes $600 pandemic relief for low earners

Sharing from CDCAN:

JANUARY 6, 2021 - STATE CAPITOL UPDATE

EARLY ACTION BUDGET: GOVERNOR NEWSOM ANNOUNCES "GOLDEN STATE STIMULUS" TO HELP LOW-INCOME CALIFORNIANS THROUGH $600 RAPID CASH PAYMENTS AND CALLS FOR EXTENSION OF AB 3088 EVICTION MORATORIUM PROVISIONS (SET TO EXPIRE JANUARY 31, 2021) 
Proposals are Part of What Governor is Referring to as his "Early Action Budget" that He Wants Legislature to Take Immediate Action On in Coming Weeks Ahead of Action of the Main 2021-2022 State Budget in Mid-June


SACRAMENTO, CA [BY MARTY OMOTO, CDCAN LAST UPDATED  01/06/2021 02:40 PM PACIFIC TIME] - Governor Gavin Newsom earlier this afternoon (January 6th) announced additional major proposals that he is asking the California Legislature to take immediate action on, as part of what he is referring to as an "Early Action Budget", meant to help low-income Californians through $600 repaid cash payments and calls for extension of eviction moratorium.
    The "Early Action Budget" proposals are part of what the Governor hopes will be implemented ahead of the normal final vote in mid-June of the state budget, 
    The Governor earlier this week and earlier, announced other proposals including a $4.5 billion major economic recovery plan and proposals to re-open public schools - that will make up the package of proposals that he is calling "immediate action items" for the "Early Action Budget".  
    The Governor said that his Golden State Stimulus proposal would provide a $600 rapid cash support directly to roughly four million low-income Californians who, coupled with the current federal stimulus ($600), could receive at least $1,200 of direct relief. The state’s stimulus will also reach low-income Californians who are excluded from the federal stimulus, like undocumented households that file taxes with an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN), including parents with U.S. citizen children.
    The Governor is also calling for "immediate action" that he says is necessary to protect more Californians from eviction by extending critical eviction protections enacted by AB 3088 (see below) - set to expire January 31, 20201 - and ensuring that California’s $2.6 billion share of federal rental assistance is distributed according to greatest need and with accountability.
    “Through the Golden State Stimulus, Californians who have been impacted by this pandemic will get help to provide for their families and keep a roof over their heads,” said Governor Newsom. “This plan will provide relief for Californians in need by distributing $600 rapid cash support – for some, at least $1,200 when coupled with federal relief – and extend the eviction moratorium.”
CDCAN NOTE: To receive the free CDCAN Reports, send email request, with "Subscribe CDCAN" in the subject line, to Marty Omoto athttp://martyomoto@att.net

REACTION FROM LEGISLATURE
    State Senate President Pro Temp Toni G. Atkins (Democrat - San Diego) and Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon (Democrat - Lakewood) issued the following statement today regarding Governor Gavin Newsom’s proposed Golden State Stimulus and eviction moratorium extension: 
    “California’s low wage workers, renters, and ‘mom-and-pop’ landlords have been hit particularly hard by the economic crisis created by COVID-19 – the Legislature passed bills last year to help those Californians, and we will again take swift and bold actions to assist them now. One way to provide immediate support is to expand the California Earned Income Tax Credit (CalEITC), a program created by the Legislature and championed – and expanded – by both houses for years. We applaud Governor Newsom’s proposal to bolster the CalEITC [California Earned Income Tax Credit] because we’ve seen its success. We look forward to reviewing and building upon the Governor’s Golden State Stimulus proposal, as well as continuing to work with the Governor on an eviction moratorium extension that protects both struggling renters and landlords, while also positioning our state for a robust economic recovery. As we have said, we must continue on the responsible path of strengthening California and our communities without making our economic challenges worse. These proposals follow that path.”
     State Senator Mike McGuire (Democrat - Healdsburg), issued a statement in reaction to the Governor's Golden State Stimulus proposal that it "...is needed now more than ever. Millions of working families are on the ropes, barely hanging on during this pandemic-induced recession. This additional $600 in rapid cash relief will put food on the table for millions of vulnerable Californians, help pay rent and these funds will be a shot in the arm for our economy. The EITC [Earned Income Tax Credit] has been a priority for the Senate for many years now and we look forward to partnering with the Governor to get these dollars into the pockets of struggling families as quickly as possible,” said Senator Mike McGuire (D-Healdsburg).
    Assemblymember Eloise Gomez Reyes (Democrat - San Bernardino), issued a statement that “...too many families have been financially devastated by this pandemic including countless families in the Inland Empire. We can and we must do more to provide assistance to get them through this difficult time, particularly those most impacted. The Golden State Stimulus will put $600 into the pockets of those who need it the most, and when added to federal relief, could mean $1200 in quick support for low-income Californians. We are proud to collaborate with the Governor on this important proposal."

WHAT THE GOVERNOR IS PROPOSING
    The following, compiled by CDCAN, are the proposals the Governor made today that make up his "Golden State Stimulus" Package: 
  • GOLDEN STATE STIMULUS AND RAPID CASH PAYMENTS: Under the Governor's plan, the Golden State Stimulus would refund $600 to all 2019 taxpayers who received a California Earned Income Tax Credit (CalEITC) in 2020, as well as to 2020 taxpayers with Individual Taxpayer Identification Numbers (ITINs) who are eligible for and receive the CalEITC in 2021. Californians with annual incomes of $30,000 or less may be eligible for the CalEITC. Focusing on CalEITC recipients allows for a timely identification of and distribution to the population that likely started 2020 with few financial resources and disproportionately lost their jobs or work hours during the pandemic. The payments would be sent out to tax year 2019 CalEITC recipients in February and March 2021. ITIN taxpayers, who are newly eligible for the CalEITC, would receive the additional tax refund after they file their 2020 tax return, typically in February through April of 2021. The timing of these refunds is meant to immediately help low-income households with expenses like food and rent. Last year, nearly 3.9 million CalEITC tax returns were filed, and the program put $1.1 billion back in the pockets of hardworking Californians.
  • EVICTION MORATORIUM EXTENSION: In August, the Governor and Legislature worked in partnership to enact AB 3088 (see below for background and links about that bill) that the Governor's office asserts is the nation’s strongest statewide eviction protections, though the protections of that eviction moratorium expires on January 31. 2021 this month.
    The Governor noted that after months of advocacy, California now has significant help with $2.6 billion in federal stimulus money, targeted to stabilize the lowest-income at-risk renters and small property owners.
    The Governor is proposing that the state quickly and accountably deploy all $2.6 billion in federal renter relief as early action – $1.4 billion of which is allocated directly to the state and $1.2 billion of which is allocated to entitlement jurisdictions – all targeting low-income California households, while helping stabilize small property owners who are also struggling. This $2.6 billion, combined with hundreds of millions in other investments through the National Mortgage Settlement and tenant legal defense, and strengthened foreclosure protections, will keep as many people housed as possible and help get California’s economy back on its feet. The Governor is also proposing that the AB 3088 eviction moratorium be extended. Under this proposal, California renters who are experiencing financial hardship related to the COVID-19 pandemic and pay at least 25 percent of their monthly rent cannot be evicted for unpaid rent.

NEXT STEPS - "EARLY ACTION BUDGET"
    The reference by the Governor of his "immediate action proposals" mean that he will ask the Legislature - scheduled to convene the 2021 Legislative Session on January 11th - to approve in the next several weeks and months, several key proposals - some that part of his economic recovery package - that would be part of what he is referring to as a "Early Action Budget" - that would go into effect immediately.
    Those proposals, including those offered today - while part of the larger 2021-2022 State Budget - would be ahead of the Governor's 2021-2022 budget revisions released in May (referred to as the "May Revise") and passage by the Legislature of the actual state budget for 2021-2022 on June 15th. 
    Yesterday (January 5th), the Governor proposed, with many items as part of the "Early Action Budget", a massive $4.5 billion Economic Recovery Plan for California. 
    On December 30th, the Governor released the $2 billion "State Safe Schools for All" plan, that is part of the "Early Action Budget", to support schools to continue operating safely in-person and to expand the number of schools safely resuming in-person instruction. That plan, according to the Governor, was developed in partnership with the Legislature, and the Governor will propose an "early action package" to ensure schools have the resources necessary to successfully implement key safety precautions and mitigation measures. Components of the plan will be launched in the coming weeks
    The Legislature, scheduled to convene the 2021 Legislative Session on January 11th (Monday) - a week later due to COVID-19, has not finalized how it will proceed in taking "immediate action" on those parts of the Governor's proposed economic recovery package - and presumably other proposals covering other critical needs (including major funding for public school re-opening) - that would make up what is being called an "Early Action Budget", months ahead of the passage of the actual 2021-2022 State Budget in mid-June.
    The Legislature has not finalized how it will proceed in the coming weeks and months to address not only the crisis in housing related to evictions and foreclosures (current state legislation expires January 31, 2021), but also how it will proceed with hearings dealing with the Governor's "immediate action" proposals tied to an "Early Action Budget" and hearings tied to the other parts of the actual 2021-2022 State Budget proposal that will not have "immediate actions" in the coming weeks and months. 

BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON AB 3088
    The following, as background to the Governor's "Golden State Stimulus" proposal that included a proposal to extend the provisions of AB 3088, that includes eviction protections, that expire January 31, 2021.
    Under the new AB 3088, as amended August 28, 2020, passed by the Legislature and signed into law by the Governor on August 31, 2020,  and compiled by CDCAN:
  • EVICTION PROTECTION: Under the bill as signed into law August 31, 2020 (and set to expire January 31, 2021), created the "COVID-19 Tenant Relief Act of 2020" that protects tenants against evictions (with exceptions) for nonpayment of rent covering the period of  March 1, 2020 to September 1, 2020. Tenants can continue to avoid eviction if they pay at least 25% of their rent starting September 1, 2020 and until January 31, 2021. After January 31, 2021 which full rent would have to be paid - unless other legislation is passed by the California Legislature and signed into law by the Governor before that date.  
  • FINANCIAL HARDSHIP DECLARATIONS: to qualify for the eviction protections, tenants would be required to provide a signed declarations with their landlords that they are suffering financial hardship because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Would also authorize a landlord to require a high-income tenant, as defined in the bill, to additionally submit documentation supporting the claim that the tenant has suffered COVID-19-related financial distress if the landlord has proof of income showing the tenant is a high-income tenant.
  • SUPERSEDES CITY OR COUNTY ORDINANCES: The bill, as signed into law on August 31, 2020, provides that the "COVID-19 Tenant Relief Act of 2020" would preempt (supersede) an ordinance, resolution, regulation, or administrative action adopted by a city, county, or city and county in response to the COVID-19 pandemic to protect tenants from eviction based on nonpayment of rental payments, as specified in the bill.
  • UNPAID RENT: Under the bill as signed into law August 31, 2020, the unpaid rent (both the amount of rent owed since March 1, 2020 and the portion of rent unpaid from September 1, 2020 through January 31, 2021, would be treated as consumer debt, only recoverable by a landlord through small claims court. 
  • ALLOWS EVICTIONS FOR OTHER CAUSES: Would not prevent evictions for other causes, such as cases in which renters have become nuisances to neighbors - a provision pushed by property owners who are landlords. 
  • RENTAL PROPERTY: The  bill as signed into law August 31, 2020, created the "Tenant, Homeowner, and Small Landlord Relief and Stabilization Act of 2020", would, among other things, until January 1, 2023, additionally apply those protections to a first lien mortgage or deed of trust that is secured by residential real property that is occupied by a tenant, contains no more than four dwelling units, and meets certain criteria, including that a tenant occupying the property is unable to pay rent due to a reduction in income resulting from the novel coronavirus.
  • SMALL LANDLORD AND HOMEOWNER RELIEF  The bill as signed into law August 31, 2020, also enacted the "COVID-19 Small Landlord and Homeowner Relief Act of 2020", which requires a mortgage servicer to provide a written notice to a borrower, if the mortgage servicer denies forbearance during the effective time period, as defined in the bill, that states the reasons for that denial if the borrower was both current on payments as of February 1, 2020, and is experiencing a financial hardship that prevents the borrower from making timely payments on the mortgage obligation due, directly or indirectly, to the COVID-19 emergency. Also requires a mortgage servicer to comply with applicable federal guidance regarding borrower options following a COVID-19 related forbearance
  • BUSINESS, CONSUMER SERVICES AND HOUSING AGENCY AND DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE: The bill as signed into law August 31, 2020, requires the California Business, Consumer Services and Housing Agency to, in consultation with the Governor's Department of Finance, to engage with residential tenants, landlords, property owners, deed-restricted affordable housing providers, and financial sector stakeholders about strategies and approaches to direct potential future federal stimulus funding to most effectively and efficiently provide relief to distressed tenants, landlords, and property owners
 
  • Sharing from the Office of Governor Gavin Newsom

    Governor Newsom to Propose $4.5 Billion for Equitable Recovery for California’s Businesses and Jobs in 2021 Budget 
    Published: Jan 05, 2021
    Calls for immediate action to support small businesses, including $575 million on top of the $500 million previously allocated to California’s Small Business COVID-19 Relief Grant, bringing total support to more than $1 billion
    SACRAMENTO – Governor Gavin Newsom today previewed his Equitable Recovery for California’s Businesses and Jobs plan, the business and workforce recovery elements of his 2021-22 State Budget that will help California through the COVID-19 pandemic and advance an equitable, broad-based recovery.
    Watch the Governor provide a brief overview of his Equitable Recovery for California’s Businesses and Jobs plan here.
    Building on actions the state has taken to support California’s businesses throughout the pandemic, including emergency aid and regulatory relief, these proposals double down on the Newsom Administration’s commitment to rebuilding the economy, with investments across sectors and benefits for businesses of all sizes.

    In relevant part: Housing
    Through the Infill Infrastructure Grant (IIG) Program, this Budget proposes $500 million to create jobs and long-term housing development to unlock more than 7,500 new permanently affordable homes for Californians. IIG grants to local governments and developers bring the cost down for new housing by defraying costs for things like sewers, roads and site preparation, all while putting thousands of people to work in good jobs building this housing-related infrastructure. $250 million of these funds are proposed for early action.
    For full article: Governor Newsom to Propose $4.5 Billion for Equitable Recovery for California’s Businesses and Jobs in 2021 Budget

    Governor Newsom Statement on Protest at U.S. Capitol
    Published: Jan 06, 2021
    SACRAMENTO – Governor Gavin Newsom has cancelled his COVID-19 update today out of an abundance of caution to ensure the safety of Governor’s Office staff and issued the following statement in response to the events transpiring at the U.S. Capitol:
    “Peaceful protest is an important mechanism of our democracy but what we are witnessing in our nation’s Capitol building is reprehensible and an outright assault to our democracy and Democratic institutions.
    “The people of California have spoken, and our congressional delegation should never have to fear for their lives to represent Californians. We are concerned for the safety of California’s congressional delegation and U.S. Capitol staff, and are reaching out to offer support in every way possible. President Trump must call for an end to this escalating situation, acknowledge the will of the people to bring President-Elect Biden to the White House and move immediately to a peaceful transition of power.”
    Source: Governor Newsom Statement on Protest at U.S. Capitol

     Sharing from California Health and Human Services
    California Releases First-Ever Master Plan for Aging
    January 6, 2021
    With the state’s 60-and-over population expected to grow to 10.8 million people by 2030, COVID-19 has highlighted the urgent need to embrace new ways of supporting older Californians, people with disabilities, and communities of color
    The Master Plan applies hard lessons learned from the pandemic to a new 10-year strategy for creating an age-friendly California where older adults can thrive
    The Plan outlines five bold goals and 23 strategies for building a California for All Ages—including a data dashboard for tracking progress and local playbook to drive the on-the-ground partnerships needed to get there
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    DATE: January 6, 2021
    CONTACT: engage@aging.ca.gov
    SACRAMENTO – The Newsom Administration today announced the release of California’s first-ever Master Plan for Aging, a comprehensive framework that will prepare the state for significant demographic changes in the years ahead, including the growth of the 60-and-over population to 10.8 million people by 2030.
    The Master Plan’s development began with an Executive Order from the Governor in June 2019, directing the Secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency to develop a strategy for promoting the health and well-being of older Californians. After more than a year of deliberations with stakeholders and the public and in collaboration with the Governor’s Task Force on Alzheimer’s Prevention, Preparedness, and a Path Forward chaired by Maria Shriver, the final Master Plan for Aging includes a 10-year blueprint for promoting healthy aging—including five bold proposals for building housing for all ages, improving access to health services, providing inclusive opportunities for seniors to live and work without fear of abuse and neglect, bolstering the caregiving workforce, and increasing economic security for aging Californians.
    The Master Plan also applies the hard lessons learned during COVID-19, which has highlighted the urgent need to embrace new ways of supporting older adults, people with disabilities, and communities of color. The final plan includes more than 100 specific initiatives for addressing issues that have been exacerbated by the pandemic, from staffing shortages in skilled nursing facilities to a lack of broadband access in many communities.
    “When I took office, I made it a priority to advance solutions for not just older Californians, but for all of us who love and care for them,” said Governor Gavin Newsom. “This Master Plan on Aging advances bold, innovative, uniquely Californian solutions for issues that we will all confront within our own families and communities, if we have not already—and does so with a sustained focus on equity that we need to lift up everyone. The Plan reflects more than a year of hard work, research and sustained engagement to drive the partnerships that will improve lives for the older Californians of today and tomorrow. I thank everyone who contributed to this tremendous blueprint for the work to come.”
    At a time when California’s senior population is becoming more ethnically diverse—and more likely to be single or childless, live alone, work longer, and have lower incomes than in decades past—the Master Plan outlines five bold goals and 23 strategies for leaders in government, business, philanthropy, and community-based organizations to collaborate on creating age-friendly communities for all Californians. The Plan also sets a series of ambitious targets that will be used to track progress and provide accountability. The Master Plan will be powered by more than 100 action-ready initiatives that have already been adopted by state agencies and are prepared for implementation, in partnership with stakeholders and the Legislature.
    The Master Plan for Aging’s Five Bold Goals for 2030
  • Housing for All Ages and Stages. We will live where we choose as we age in communities that are age-, disability-, and dementia-friendly and climate- and disaster-ready. Target: Millions of New Housing Options to Age Well.
  • Health Reimagined. We will have access to the services we need to live at home in our communities and to optimize our health and quality of life. Target: Close the Equity Gap in and Increase Life Expectancy.
  • Inclusion and Equity, Not Isolation. We will have lifelong opportunities for work, volunteering, engagement, and leadership and will be protected from isolation, discrimination, abuse, neglect, and exploitation. Target: Keep Increasing Life Satisfaction as We Age.
  • Caregiving That Works. We will be prepared for and supported through the rewards and challenges of caring for aging loved ones. Target: One Million High-Quality Caregiving Jobs.
  • Affording Aging. We will have economic security for as long as we live. Target: Close the Equity Gap in and Increase Elder Economic Sufficiency.
  • For full article: California Releases First-Ever Master Plan for Aging
    A Tidbit from Me: I am really pleased with the Governor’s release of the Master Plan for Aging Blueprint. Many of the policy initiatives will truly support people with disabilities and older adults to be able to age in place with the services and supports to thrive in their communities. While I mentioned people with disabilities and older adults this Master Plan is for everyone, no matter what age. The Master Plan for Aging is a living plan. Marin CIL is working with community members, stakeholders, and trusted partners to advance many of the Master Plan’s objectives here in Marin and beyond. As I mentioned in previous PM Morning Reports I had the honor of serving on the Master Plan for Aging Long Term Services and Supports Subcommittee. I want to honor everyone who was part of the development of the Master Plan, Governor Newsom (for his vision), and all of the stakeholders and community members who provided such valuable input and technical assistance. I also want to do a shout out for Marin CIL’s own Julia Hales and our ADRC team for all their work to advance a No Wrong Door service delivery system to California (a One-Door approach). No Wrong Door (NWD) Systems empower individuals to make informed decisions, to exercise control over their long-term care needs, and to achieve their personal goals and preferences.
     
The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Breaking News, Marin Renews Great Plates Program, Gov. Newsom to Announce MPA, & More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on January 6, 2021

Good Morning my Marin CIL Family and Community,
I hope you are all doing well this morning. 4 am came early this morning and the Batphone rang early. Lot’s to do. A lot going on today so here we go. Enjoy the read! Raising my cup of coffee to you this morning. Have a wonderful day!

Breaking News from CBS NEWS:
Warnock projected to win Georgia Senate seat as Democrats near majority
BY GRACE SEGERS, KATHRYN WATSON AND CAROLINE LINTON UPDATED ON: JANUARY 6, 2021 / 12:01 PM / CBS NEWS
CBS News projects Democrat Raphael Warnock has defeated incumbent Senator Kelly Loeffler in Tuesday's Senate runoff election in Georgia, making history as the Peach State's first Black senator. The other race between incumbent GOP Senator David Perdue and Democrat Jon Ossoff leans Democratic as of Wednesday morning. 
Gabe Sterling, a top Georgia election official, said about 65,000 votes remain uncounted Wednesday morning, mainly from areas where Democrats typically perform well. Ossoff enjoys a lead of just over 17,000 votes, or 0.4% of the vote.
If Democrats win both seats, there will be a 50-50 split in the Senate, with Vice President-elect Kamala Harris as the tie-breaking vote in her capacity as the president of the Senate. 
"I'm just so very grateful to the people of Georgia," Warnock said Wednesday on "CBS This Morning." "They sent a strong and clear message last night when they sent a person who grew up in public housing, one of 12 children in my family, I'm the first college graduate. That I am serving in the United States Senate in a few days pushes against the grain of so many expectations. But this is America."

Marin County Update:

Update to the Board of Supervisors
Dr. Matt Willis (Public Health Officer) and Dr. Tyler Evans (Deputy Public Health Officer) presented an update at today’s Board of Supervisor’s meeting.  Topics covered included COVID-19 case trends, current status of the Blueprint for a Safer Economy and the Stay-Home Order, and COVID-19 vaccine distribution.
WATCH ON YOUTUBE
RELATED RESOURCES:

 
Applications Open: CareLife Small Business Relief Grant Program:
The State of California is offering a grant program for small businesses impacted by COVID-19. Funds are awarded to underserved micro and small businesses in early 2021.
The 1st application round closes on January 13, 2021. Applicants should start receiving notifications on grant approval/disapproval after January 20, 2021 and funding should be received within 30 days after that.
The 2nd Round dates will be determined later, but if a business applied in the 1st round and was not awarded any funding, and was eligible, there is no need to apply for the 2nd round, as all qualified applicants will be rolled over into the next funding round for consideration.
To apply visit careliefgrant.com, click on the FIND A PARTNER button on the top of the screen – click on the BY COUNTY button and click on the MARIN button, then choose a partner and click on the Application button. The partner you choose will be able to assist you with any questions you might have.
The grant awards are as follows based on business income:
  • $1,000 - $100,000 = $5,000 grant
  • $100,001 - $1,000,000 = $15,000 grant
  • $1,000,001 - $2,500,000 = $25,000 grant
Businesses are allowed to apply for a lower amount than listed. For more information visit: https://careliefgrant.com/
 
New Look for our Data & Surveillance Page
Today, our epidemiology team unveiled an refreshed look for our data & surveillance webpage that provides a greater level of user table/graph interaction with access to the raw data. Our data webpage now uses Tableau dashboards to help visualize the impact of COVID-19 in Marin County.  Under each dashboard there are links to datasets available on Marin County's Open Data Portal. To learn more about how to use the features of these dashboards navigate to the "How To Use" section of our data page.
Refreshed tables include:
  • Key Indicators (cumulative case rates thus far)
  • COVID-19 cases and deaths
  • COVID-19 testing and percent positivity
  • COVID-19 hospitalizations
  • Demographics of COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths
  • Demographic trends
  • COVID-19 cases by geography
Of course, you’ll still receive a daily snapshot of data from these daily status updates.
 
 
Sharing from the California Alliance for Retired Americans (CARA)
IMPORTANT MEETING ON COVID FOR SENIORS and PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES
California Aging and Disability Community Covid-19 Updates
Friday, Jan. 8TH AT 3-4PM
Presentations from legal and community advocates on crisis care plans in hospitals and vaccination prioritization
Register here: tinyurl.com/CACovidUpdates

Governor to Release Master Plan on Aging – January 6, 2021             
California Budget by January 10, 2021

After months of deliberation, Governor Newsom plans to unveil his 10 year Master Plan on Aging on Wednesday, January 6th.  The plan will be posted sometime tomorrow at: https://www.chhs.ca.gov/home/master-plan-for-aging/.  We are hopeful that many of the recommendations from the Stakeholder Advisory Committee and many CARA members will be incorporated into the Governors’ plan.  CARA also plans to work on legislative and administrative initiatives to begin implementation of some of our recommendations.  Stay tuned for more information about these efforts.
 
And on to the State budget… To say that 2020 has been a difficult year is an understatement for sure.  As we look toward 2021 with more hope for a vaccine to safely allow us to re-connect in person with our families, friends, colleagues, we must also remember the very difficult lessons from the pandemic – lessons that were made harder because of needed support for programs and services that help keep seniors and people with disabilities living safely in their homes and communities.
 
We must continue to support and increase funding at the State level for community based services like In Home Supportive Services, para-transit, meal programs, adult day health care, multi service senior programs, independent living centers, and more.  These programs not only help people every day stay in their homes and avoid unnecessary institutionalization, but during COVID, have prevented many more infections and deaths from the virus.  CARA will be reviewing the Governor’s budget proposal and participating in hearings to advocate for the programs and services that we want to support and enhance.  We will need your help and advocacy to make sure that needs and priorities of seniors and people with disabilities are heard and front of mind.

A Tidbit from Me: I served as a member of the Master Plan on Aging Long-Term Services and Supports Subcommittee. After being reviewed by the Newsom Administration the recommendations from the Master Plan are expected to be released today. I am including a link so you can learn more about the development of California’s Master Plan on Aging: Together We Engage
For More Information: California Alliance for Retired Americans


Sharing from the ARC of California
Start the Year by Taking the First Step to Making a Financial Plan!
 
Everyone must plan for how they will pay for the things they want and need in their life, and it’s important to plan before you need it. The beginning of a new year is a perfect time to start!

You don't need a lot of money to plan—but you do need to plan!

The Arc's Center for Future Planning has created free resources to help.
Download our free documents to:
 
 
GET RESOURCES


Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin looks to extend pandemic meal delivery program
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal PUBLISHED: January 5, 2021 at 6:00 p.m. | UPDATED: January 5, 2021 at 6:50 p.m.
Marin County is expected to continue a program that pays restaurants to deliver meals to residents sheltering for the pandemic when the current funding runs out next month.
“Right now there is FEMA funding through Jan. 7,” said Kari Beuerman, Marin County’s social services director.
FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, is providing most of the money for the “Marin Great Plates” program. It has been authorizing funding at 30-day intervals since it was announced by Gov. Gavin Newsom on April 24.
“We’re definitely anticipating another 30-day extension,” Beuerman said.
FEMA is expected to pick up 75% of the cost and the state is slated to pay about 18.5%.
Marin participated in the program from May 18 to June 10 and then dropped out before resuming in September. During the first 30-day period, the county picked up the remaining 6.5% cost of the program, which amounted to a little over $33,000.
When the county resumed the program, it required the participating restaurants to pay the 6.5% out of their share of the reimbursements. However, the county has fronted the entire cost of the program so far, which amounts to over $4.39 million. It is still waiting to be reimbursed by the state and FEMA.
For full Article: Marin looks to extend pandemic meal delivery program
A Tidbit from Me: According to a Marin County NEWS RELEASE the “State of California’s Great Plates Delivered Program, is set up to provide free meals to qualified older adults who are sheltering in place during the COVID-19 pandemic and ineligible for other nutrition programs.”

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Alot Happening: Covid-19 News, CFILC Covid-19 Survey, Interview with an Incredible Advocate, & More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on January 5, 2021

Good Morning my Fabulous Marin CIL Family and Community,

I hope you all are doing well this morning. Today started early for me. I think I see a second cup of coffee in my future. Below is my PM Report for you. There is a lot going on. Sending you a smile today. Wishing you all a wonderful day.

County of Marin Update

New Year Message from the Public Health Officer
How does Dr. Matt Willis sum-up 2020 in one word? What was his most challenging aspect of the past year? And, what do some words from Bruce Springsteen have to do with our COVID-19 response?  For answers to those questions and more, watch this video:
WATCH ON YOUTUBE
 
 
RECAP: Community Conversation with Schools Community
Earlier today, Dr. Matt Willis and Dr. Lisa Santora joined Marin Superintendent of Schools, Mary Jane Burke, for a virtual town hall discussion about the status of schools reopening to site-based instruction and COVID-19 data trends tied to classrooms. In addition, Dr. Santora reviewed Marin County’s effective mitigation strategies and the new “California Safe Schools for All” plan.
WATCH ON YOUTUBE
 
 
Data Map Updated to Show Cases by Census Tract
Today, our epidemiology team unveiled an updated version of the “Confirmed COVID-19 Cases by City and Community” map that can be found on the data & surveillance webpage. The new view provides a more granular view of case trends versus grouping the data by city or zip code.  Most of Marin County’s data is now shown by census tract and has been updated to correspond to 2019 American Community Survey population estimates. However, because West Marin census tracts are so large, West Marin data is defined into regions that combine adjacent geographies where the cumulative total population for that area is greater than 1,000.  
For compliance with confidentiality standards, case information is only shared for geographies with greater than 1,000 population and more than 10 cases cumulatively, after which day-to-day increases are permitted to be shared even if the daily increases are fewer than 10 cases. For all regions, both the cumulative and 30-day case counts are shown.  Data for each jurisdiction can be accessed by clicking on an individual region or clicking on the downward arrow at the base of the map.

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Newsom: State’s virus vaccination pace too slow
By ASSOCIATED PRESS |
PUBLISHED: January 4, 2021 at 8:13 p.m. | UPDATED: January 5, 2021 at 6:44 a.m.
SACRAMENTO — Only about 1% of California’s 40 million residents have been vaccinated against the coronavirus, setting a pace of immunization that’s “not good enough,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said Monday.
The Democratic governor said the state is trying to execute the massive vaccination campaign “with a sense of urgency that is required of this moment and the urgency that people demand.”
Still, the 454,000 doses of vaccine that have been administered in California represent just a third of the more than nearly 1.3 million received in the state so far, according to the California Department of Public Health. Distribution hiccups and logistical challenges — including hospitals having more vaccine doses available than people available to take them — have slowed the initial vaccine rollout in California.
Across the country, the pace of immunizations has gone slower than planned due to logistical hurdles and differing approaches across states and counties. On Monday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said nearly 4.6 million shots have been dispensed.
For full article: Newsom: State’s virus vaccination pace too slow

Sharing from Cal OES
State Officials Announce Latest COVID-19 Facts
 January 4, 2021 Monica Vargas
SACRAMENTO – Today the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) announced the most recent statistics on COVID-19, including data on intensive care unit (ICU) capacity across the state. Based on ICU data, four regions, San Joaquin Valley, Southern California, Greater Sacramento and the Bay Area continue under the Regional Stay at Home Order. Once a region’s four-week ICU projection shows a capacity of greater than or equal to 15%, the order will be lifted for that area.
Current Available ICU Capacity by Region

  • Bay Area: 7.9%
  • Greater Sacramento: 12.1%
  • Northern California: 30%
  • San Joaquin Valley: 0.0%
  • Southern California: 0.0%
Current Status of Regional Stay at Home Order in Affected Regions
  • San Joaquin Valley: Remains under order; four-week ICU capacity projections do not meet criteria to exit order.
  • Southern California: Remains under order; four-week ICU capacity projections do not meet criteria to exit order.
  • Greater Sacramento: Remains under order; four-week ICU capacity projections do not meet criteria to exit order.
  • Bay Area: Will remain under the order until at least January 8 with potential to extend depending on four-week ICU capacity projections.
ICU capacity projections for regions that are eligibly to exit the order are calculated daily based on four factors: current estimated regional ICU capacity available, measure of current community transmission, current regional case rates and the proportion of ICU cases being admitted. Decreasing community transmission and increasing the health system capacity can help a region’s projected ICU capacity so they can exit the order.
Read the full Regional Stay Home OrderSupplement to the Order, and frequently asked questions.
Due to high rates of COVID-19 hospitalizations impacting the health care system, California is also under a Limited Stay at Home Order. The order applies to all counties that are currently under the Regional Stay at Home Order and those in Tier One (Purple) of the Blueprint for a Safer Economy. The Limited Stay at Home Order will expire after the Regional Stay At Home Order has been terminated in all regions of the state.
Statewide COVID-19 Data as of Today
  • California has 2,420,894 confirmed cases to date. Numbers may not represent true day-over-day change as reporting of test results can be delayed.
  • There were 29,633 newly recorded confirmed cases Sunday.
  • The 7-day positivity rate is 13.3% and the 14-day positivity rate is 12.4%.
  • There have been 34,127,013 tests conducted in California. This represents an increase of 314,227 during the prior 24-hour reporting period.
  • As case numbers continue to rise in California, the total number of individuals who will have serious outcomes will also increase. There have been 26,635 COVID-19 deaths since the start of the pandemic.
  • As of January 3, a total of 454,306 vaccine doses have been administered statewide. As of December 28, a total of 1,762,900 vaccine doses have been distributed to local health departments and health care systems that have facilities in multiple counties.

Sharing from CFILC
COVID-19 Vaccine Survey
The California Foundation for Independent Living Centers (CFILC) advocates for the prioritization of people with disabilities and older adults in accessing the COVID-19 vaccine. 

We value your input! Please consider taking our brief COVID-19 vaccine survey. Your responses are confidential, and they will be used to affect systems change regarding the COVID-19 vaccine distribution. 

Continue to stay safe this new year. Practice social distancing, wash your hands, and remain six feet apart. 

Take our survey here!

#Equity #Accessibility #Transparency #Safety 
A Tidbit from Me: CFILC is Marin CIL’s membership  organization. CFILC’s Executive Director Christina Mills is a key representative, together with Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund, Disability Rights California, California State Council on Developmental Disability, representing people with disabilities on the Statewide Vaccine Distribution Taskforce. Marin CIL also participates in the Disability Organizing Network which is a program of CFILC. If you have any questions or need assistance please feel free to reach out to Marin CIL (415) 234-3840.

Sharing from the Disability Visibility Project
Q&A with Ligia Andrade Zúñiga
All politics are local, right? All over the United States, more disabled people are running for office and winning. Here is my interview with Ligia Andrade Zúñiga about her campaign this year and her vision for the future. SF Bay Area represent y’all!!
 
Please tell me a little about yourself and your background! 
My name is Ligia Andrade Zúñiga, I am 40 years old, my pronouns are she, her, hers (ella, de ella), and I identify as a woman of color (LatinX) with a disability. I was born and raised in Redwood City, California. I am first generation North American. My parents each immigrated to the states from different parts of Guatemala in the 70s. I hold a Bachelor’s Degree in Human Services with an emphasis in Counseling and Administration, and a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Notre Dame de Namur University in Belmont, California. I’ve been working in nonprofits and local government for a little over 20 years and have served on different boards, commissions, and committees for almost 20 years. My work focuses on disability justice, civil rights, and sexuality and disability specifically in access and education especially around reproductive justice and reproductive health rights. I have two sons, one is 23 and the other is 18, they are both in college. I currently live in the San Francisco Bay Area in California.
 
When did you first become involved in the SF Bay Area disability community? What do you love about living in this area? 
In 2009 I sustained a pretty severe spinal cord injury. About 6 months after my injury I became very involved in the spinal cord injury peer support program at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center where I did my rehabilitation. About a year and a half after my injury I also started working for the Silicon Valley Independent Living Center (SVILC). I learned so much about disability justice, disability rights. I learned about disability history, and to be proud of my new identity, to be proud of who I am, that disability is a part of human diversity. I learned to embrace my new culture. Between peer support and SVILC I learned my voice again. I was able to see my purpose clearly. Peer support and SVILC saved my life. 
All of the advocacy and work I did before on social change prepared me for what my contribution to our community would be. There were certain issues that affected our community that really spoke to me. It was then when I made a commitment to keep fighting for our community anyway I could.
There are so many things I love about living in this area. First and foremost, this is my home. I was born and raised here. I love how rich the history of so many cultures is here. I love how the demand for social change, access, equality is so strong here. Although there are many things that we need to change, there are also so many things that we are privileged to have here.
 
This fall you ran for a seat on the San Mateo Union High School District Board of Trustees and won. Congratulations! How do you feel? What was it like when the results came in Tuesday night on November 3, 2020? 
Thank you! I am so grateful and so honored to have so many people supporting me. I’m very proud of what my campaign team and I accomplished, I feel really excited for all of the work that is to come. It sends a message that people want change. The night of the election was really exciting. We had a watch party on Zoom, friends, my family, people that were helping out on my campaign, my kids, we all watched it together. On December 3rd the election results were confirmed. That blew me away even more. I was able to receive more votes than both the incumbent and the other candidate that was running. What was really important was what this symbolized. I am the first Latina with a disability to serve on this particular board.
For full Interview: Q&A with Ligia Andrade Zúñiga
A Tidbit from Me: For transparency I (Peter) am the Chair of the California State Independent Living Council (SILC). Ligia is an incredible advocate who I have had the pleasure to work with at the SILC. Ligia is a council member and is the Chair of the Communications and Collaborations Committee. In collaboration with the State Network of Independent Living Centers (ILCs) and the State Designated Entity (California Department of Rehabilitation), the SILC prepares a State Plan for Independent Living which sets the policy and funding levels for the state’s network of ILCs and services. To help guide this policy, the SILC solicits continual public feedback on the effectiveness of independent living services and the changing needs of the community. In addition to preparing and updating the State Plan for Independent Living, the SILC monitors the implementation of it. The SILC also coordinates with similar agencies and councils at the state and federal levels to increase communication and help assure that services to people with disabilities are delivered effectively.

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Happy New Year! Covid-19 News, Welcoming Marin Supervisor Mouton-Peters, & much More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on January 4, 2021

Good Morning my Extraordinary Marin CIL Family and Community,
Welcome to the first PM Report of 2021! Happy New Year! I hope each of you were able to enjoy the new year and were able to get some rest and enjoy time with your bubble. This morning started early for me. Phone rang early….lots to do.

Breaking news: My wife Jennifer just let me know that KTVU channel 2 in Oakland reported that Zoom, slack, Microsoft Teams, and Gmail web are currently having periodic outages. Apparently, Slack is the platform primarily affected. I am hoping for a kinder, gentler 2021 for all of us. Sending a smile your way.


County of Marin Update
Stay Home Order: What’s the status?
One of the top questions we’ve received recently is, “when can Marin County – and the entire Bay Area – exit the State of California’s Regional Stay Home Order?”
The Bay Area region is scheduled to remain under the Regional Stay Home Order until January 8 at the earliest with potential to extend depending on four-week ICU capacity projections. On Friday, California Department of Public Health (CDPH) will begin issuing four-week ICU projections for the 11 county Bay Area.  
The ICU capacity projections are based on four factors:

  • current estimated regional ICU capacity available
  • measure of current community transmission
  • current regional case rates
  • the proportion of ICU cases being admitted.
CDPH’s projections are calculated daily. Once the Bay Area region's four-week projection shows an ICU capacity of greater than or equal to 15%, the order will be lifted.
Decreasing community transmission and increasing the health system capacity can help a region's projected ICU capacity so they can exit the order.  
You can follow the region’s ICU capacity and order status on the State of California’s Regional Stay Home Order webpage.

 

Sharing from DREDF

DREDF Honors the Life & Legacy of Disability Rights Pioneer and Ally, Richard A. “Dick” Thornburgh
“Perhaps the most satisfying change the ADA has brought about is a change in attitude. As new generations of Americans have worked, lived and played side-by-side with persons with disabilities, the debilitating barriers of stereotypes and prejudices are disappearing. Participation in everyday American life has brought a sense of self-worth for persons with disabilities.”
       —Richard A. “Dick” Thornburgh, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, May 2, 2015 
Thornburgh, whose public career spanned more than twenty-five years – first as Governor of Pennsylvania, then as the Attorney General of the United States under Presidents Reagan and George H.W. Bush and later as Under-Secretary of the United Nations – passed away on December 31, 2020. He was an early ally in the fight for disability rights, access and inclusion. 
For Thornburgh, the fight was both personal and political. 
A car accident took the life of his first wife, Ginny Hooton Thornburgh, and severely injured one of their three sons, Peter, in 1960. In a 1979 New York Times interview, Thornburgh recalled: “I was left with three little children, including Peter, who suffered brain injury in the wreck. That’s a jolt. It made me think about what I wanted to do with my life, what I can do to contribute to the world.”
At the request of President George H.W. Bush, then Attorney General Thornburgh made what he considered perhaps the greatest of his many contributions – taking the lead role for the administration to ensure congressional passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. After the ADA was signed into law on July 26, 1990, Mr. Thornburgh described the day as “one of emancipation, not just for the millions of Americans with disabilities who will directly benefit from this Act, but even more so for the rest of us now free to benefit from the contributions which those with disability can make to our economy, our communities and our own well-being.”
“The day was a high point of my tenure as attorney general,” Thornburgh emphasized in his 2003 autobiography, Where the Evidence Leads.
Born July 16, 1932, Thornburgh is survived by his second wife Ginny Judson Thornburgh, a former schoolteacher from New York, who holds degrees from Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts and the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Ginny served as Director of the Interfaith Initiative of the American Association of People with Disabilities, and co-authored That All May Worship, an award-winning handbook for religious organizations to include people with disabilities in their congregations.  
In addition to his wife, Ginny, Thornburgh is survived by four sons and their families:  John and his wife, Sharon; David and his wife, Rebecca; Peter and William; six grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.  
“When I approached Attorney General Thornburgh about filing an amicus brief in Lane v. Tennessee, a case involving the constitutionality of the ADA,” remembered DREDF’s Directing Attorney Emerita Arlene B. Mayerson, “Attorney General Thornburgh was not only eager to participate, but also as down to earth as one could be.”
“Attorney General Thornburgh was the linchpin that secured the draft of the ADA,” recalled DREDF cofounder, Patrisha Wright. “His life experience and legal and political skills led the way for the Bush Administration to endorse and support the law.”
Everyone at DREDF appreciates and honors the pioneering contributions to disability communities and longterm commitment Mr. Thornburgh made by helping secure, protect and sustain our civil rights. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family, friends and loved ones.
Source: In Honor of Richard “Dick” Thornburgh 1932-2020

A Tidbit from Me: Dick Thornbugh played a truly instrumental role in the passage of the American’s with Disabilities Act. He was one of the people who carried the message from the administration of President George H.W. Bush pushing for the passage of the ADA. While many people played a key role he is credited with working with Congress in a bipartisan fashion to gain agreement on last minute policy issues which originally threatened to derail the ADA. I remember more than 30 years ago the negotiations around the American’s with Disabilities Act were down to the wire. People with disabilities, even those of us who were invited to Washington to witness the signing of the ADA, breathed a sigh of relief once President George H.W. Bush in a historic moment put pen to paper signing the American’s with Disabilities Act of 1990.

Prioritizing People with Disabilities for COVID-19 Vaccination
December 29, 2020
DREDF, along with four other disability or aging organizations that are represented on the California Community Vaccination Advisory Committee, sent a letter to the state’s Vaccination Drafting Guidelines Committee prior to its December 29 meeting. The letter advocates for prioritized vaccination for lower-income persons with disabilities of all ages who receive home and community-based long-term services and supports, as well as those with disabilities who are at great risk of COVID-19 infection and severe illness or death, particularly in light of medical rationing concerns.
 
Dear Members of the California COVID-19 Vaccine Drafting Guidelines Workgroup,
We write as members of California’s Community Advisory Vaccine Committee who collectively represent people with a wide range of disabilities and chronic health conditions across the age spectrum. After consulting with one another on the proposed 1b vaccine prioritizations proposed by the Drafting Guidelines Workgroup last week, we ask the Workgroup to include two changes to the proposed priority tiers under phase 1b:
  • Include people with disabilities of any age who receive long-term services and supports (LTSS) through Medi-Cal waiver services and programs, the In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) program, the Program for All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), and through Regional Centers.
  • Provide a “safety valve” for people with disabilities and chronic health conditions of any age who can demonstrate with medical evidence that they are at great risk of severe health consequences including death if they acquire COVID-19.
We appreciate the Workgroup’s inclusion of people with comorbid conditions ages 64-75 years in category 1b. However, we also recognize that age, in itself, is a highly inexact proxy for the disability communities, particularly lower-income people with disabilities of color, who remain at high risk for COVID infection and/or severe illness. An individual with developmental disabilities in their 50s who lives in a small group home is, in fact, at significantly higher risk of acquiring COVID-19 than someone in their 60s who can safely shelter in place without visitors because of daily exposures to direct support workers in the small group home. Moreover, the CDC’s list of recognized comorbid conditions, does not include either real-time research into how people with different disabilities experience the virus (e.g., Landes, SD, Turk, MA, & Wong, AWWA (in press), “COVID-19 Outcomes Among People with Intellectual and Developmental Disability in California: The Importance of Type of Residence and Skilled Nursing Care Needs,” Disability and Health Journal, 101051), nor the impact of medical rationing and implicit bias on people with significant disabilities. For example, a high-weight individual with multiple healthcare conditions may be unable to access regular therapy for severe lymphedema without risking COVID-19 infection and, if they end up with COVID-19 during a surge resulting in health care rationing, they also are at risk of being denied care because of the application of crisis standard of care guidelines.
There is also the equitable consideration that many people with disabilities receiving home and community-based long-term services and supports require nursing home levels of care but fought to stay out of institutions or return to the community, potentially living with family in multi-generational homes. These individuals have not been subject to the tragic rates of infection in nursing homes, where they would ironically be receiving the vaccination now, but their risks of infection and severe illness during a time of rising community infection rates should accord them a place in category 1b, regardless of their age. Studies are beginning to bear out the disproportionate impact COVID is having on people with specific disabilities, including developmental disabilities, who are 3 times more likely to die, and people with Down Syndrome, who are 10 times more likely to die. (https://tinyurl.com/y2a5f9ql; https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M20-4986), but people with less frequently occurring disabilities could also bear disproportionate impacts that have not yet been the subject of study.
We support the prioritized inclusion of personal care assistants who are coming into the homes of disabled people as front-line healthcare workers in category 1a, but since we don’t know the infectious capacity of those who have been vaccinated, those who receive personal assistance services must be separately evaluated for vaccination.
In order to provide some sense of the number of individuals that are being raised here we have some approximate figures below. Please bear in mind that there is considerable overlap both among the groups listed below as well as with other groups that are already proposed for inclusion in 1b (e.g., persons over 75 and persons between 64 and 75 with comorbid conditions).
CA Assisted Living Waiver:  5,000, with 4,500 on the waitlist
CA Community Based Adult Services Program:  40,000
CA HCBS Waiver for Californians w/DD: 95,000
CA HIV/AIDS Waiver: 1,500
CA Home and Community Based Alternatives Waiver: 5,500, with 600 on the waiting list
CA Multipurpose Senior Services Program: up to 12,000
CA Self-Determination Program for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities: 350
Community First Option: 250,000 (most overlapping with other categories in this list)
IHSS: 600,500
Regional Center Service recipients: 350,000
PACE participant: 10,000
Our recommendation would include an approximate 1.1 million Californians who would very likely have fallen within 1a if they were not being cared for in the community.
Finally, we encourage the Workgroup to recommend subpriorities within 1b based on who has been most impacted by the pandemic.  For example, all older adults 75+ have not been similarly situated, with death and infection rates disproportionately impacting older adults of color.  Further subprioritization based on considerations like race and community would be consistent with subprioritization guidance for phase 1a and is critical in ensuring a vaccine allocation grounded in equity.  
Thank you for the opportunity to provide our input to the Drafting Guidelines Workgroup.
Sincerely,
Aaron Carruthers, California State Council on Developmental Disabilities
Andy Imparato, Disability Rights California
Christina Mills, California Foundation for Independent Living Centers
Denny Chan, Justice in Aging
Silvia Yee, Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund
Source: Prioritizing People with Disabilities for COVID-19 Vaccination

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin activists seek rent freeze during coronavirus crisis
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: January 1, 2021 at 6:25 p.m. | UPDATED: January 3, 2021 at 4:48 p.m.
Lana Gasparyan, who lives at Ridgeway Apartments in Marin City, is unemployed because of the pandemic and owes months of back rent. On top of that, her landlord has notified her the rent would increase 8% effective Friday.
“I don’t think it is right,” Gasparyan said.
Marin housing advocates agree. They’re calling on the Marin County Board of Supervisors to place a temporary moratorium on rent increases during the coronavirus emergency.
“Marin Organizing Committee is asking for a freeze on rent increases and an extension and expansion of the current rent moratorium to ensure that no one is evicted until the pandemic ends,” Pat Langley, a leader of the committee, told supervisors at their meeting on Dec. 15.
Langley, a parishioner at St. Anselm Church in Ross, said low-income residents are, in many ways, more at risk than ever. Many owe thousands of dollars in rent debt. Statewide protections are due to expire at the end of January, creating uncertainty for landlords and tenants. Evictions are now being processed in the courts.
“We hear stories from renters living in a constant state of fear about how they will care for their families if their rent is raised as much as $50,” Langley said. “One way we can stretch these funds is to ensure that landlords don’t raise rent during these precarious times.”
For full article: Marin activists seek rent freeze during coronavirus crisis
A Tidbit from Me:  Marin CIL’s core services include housing preservation, retention, and advocacy. Whether you are looking for housing or need support with housing retention or advocacy or to learn more about your rights Marin CIL is here for you! If you are a person with a disability or older adult please reach out to us.

New Marin supervisor faces full plate of issues
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: January 3, 2021 at 12:52 p.m. | UPDATED: January 3, 2021 at 4:51 p.m.
Ten days after Stephanie Moulton-Peters won a landslide victory to the Board of Supervisors in March, Marin County went into its first coronavirus lockdown.
“I am very realistic that the world has changed a lot since I was elected,” Moulton-Peters said. “I have issues and priorities that I want to work on, but I am very clear that addressing COVID is the No. 1 priority right now. That has overtaken everything else.”
Moulton-Peters, elected to represent District 3 in southern Marin, will take the oath of office Tuesday when the board holds its first meeting of the new year. She previously served three terms on the Mill Valley City Council and has experience serving on several boards overseeing local transportation agencies.
Moulton-Peters, 63, said Marin County and local municipalities should look for new ways to work together and further consolidate services to cope with a huge loss of revenue due to the pandemic. She also said spending on equity initiatives should continue.
Regarding concern about a wave of evictions when state protections for renters affected by the pandemic expire at the end of January, Moulton-Peters said, “All efforts should be made to extend the eviction moratorium and the rent subsidies.”
The county and Marin cities and towns should also coordinate efforts when planning how to respond to new state laws that streamline approvals for the building of new housing, she said.
For full article: New Marin supervisor faces full plate of issues
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL has had the pleasure of knowing and working with Supervisor Stephanie Moulton-Peters for many years. She is a true champion for people with disabilities, older adults, and other communities who are traditionally marginalized. We look forward to continuing to partner with Supervisor Moulton-Peters in her new role. It is important to take a moment to honor Supervisor Kate Sears. Marin CIL has also had the pleasure of working closely with outgoing district three Supervisor Sears. Supervisor Sears was always friendly, warm, and truly listened. She was a strong environmentalist and a steadfast supporter of people with disabilities and older adults.
Sharing from the National Council on Independent Living
NCIL Presents a National Webinar & Teleconference… Challenging the Use of Artificial Intelligence in Public Benefits Determinations: A CDT Report
December 29, 2020 By theadvocacymonitor 
January 20, 2021; 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Eastern
Register online (NCIL members only)
NCIL and the Center for Democracy and Technology are excited to announce a national webinar and teleconference to share the findings of CDT’s recent report “Challenging the Use of Algorithm-driven Decision-making in Benefits Determinations Affecting People with Disabilities”. This report analyzes the various litigation strategies for challenging AI used to cut public benefits. This is a critical issue as many state governments are increasing their reliance on algorithms to determine whether, and to what extent, people qualify for public benefits.
Join us for a presentation of the report’s key findings and how states’ increasing turn to algorithmic decision-making is affecting the rights of people with disabilities. Our presenters will discuss how advocates have challenged these harms inside the courtroom and through other advocacy strategies.
Registration Fee
This webinar is free for NCIL members. Non-members may join NCIL to attend.
Meet Your Presenters
  • Lydia X. Z. Brown, Policy Counsel on CDT’s Privacy & Data Project
  • Ridhi Shetty, Policy Counsel on CDT’s Privacy & Data Project
Accessibility & Accommodations
This webinar will be held via Zoom, but participants can join by webinar or telephone. CART captioning will be provided. Training materials and connection instructions will be sent 1-2 days prior to the live event. Other accommodations may be requested on the registration form.

Sharing from Disability Rights California
City of Eureka Halts Enforcement, Will Reconsider Illegal Anti-Homelessness Law
Dec 30, 2020
(EUREKA, CA)  – An anti-homelessness ordinance set to take effect at midnight tonight has been set aside by the City of Eureka. City Council will reconsider the ordinance at its next meeting on January 5, 2020. The ordinance made it unlawful to camp in almost every part of the City, including Old Town, the Waterfront, and all City parks and recreational trails; it defined camping as living outdoors as well as occupying a vehicle in the restricted zones.
The City initially adopted the ordinance despite warnings by community advocates, including Legal Services of Northern California, that it violates recent federal court decisions and despite the fact that the City has insufficient shelter space. Shortly after receiving a letter from Legal Services of Northern California and Disability Rights California urging the City to take immediate action to halt enforcement of this ordinance, City Attorney Robert Black informed advocates that it would not be enforced and, instead, reconsidered with minor modifications.
Advocates, on behalf of unsheltered clients, are urging the City Council to refrain from criminalizing homelessness. “Now, more than ever, the City needs to show up for its most vulnerable. Rather than putting its efforts toward circumventing the constitutional protections of homeless individuals, the City should focus on ensuring all its residents’ basic needs are met,” said Rebecca Smith, of Legal Services of Northern California. “We call on the City to seize this opportunity to reconsider its approach to homelessness in our community, and to commit itself to effective, evidence-based solutions to support Eureka residents who do not have shelter. The public health and safety of the community during this devastating time depends on the support of our leaders.”
For full report: City of Eureka Halts Enforcement, Will Reconsider Illegal Anti-Homelessness Law

Sharing from the Marin VOAD
Marin County Emergency Rental Assistance Program
Do you need help paying for rent between September 2020 and January 2021?
The County’s Emergency Rental Assistance Program is currently open and accepting
applicants. To apply for and receive assistance, please do the following:

Step 1: Call 415-473-2223 or CA Relay 711 to be added to the waitlist.
If your call is not answered, please leave a message with your name and
callback number so a member of our staff can contact you.

Step 2: Our staff will reach out to you to ask some intake questions.

Step 3: Once the intake is complete, you will need to send the following
documents before we can move forward with assistance:
• Copy of photo ID with a Marin County address (if your ID doesn’t
have a Marin County address, you will need to send a copy of a
photo ID with a utility bill/other bill that shows your Marin County
address)
• Proof of Income (pay stub, bank statement)
• Copy of the first page of your rental lease, or other proof of
residency
*Note: if you can’t get some of this documentation, we are willing to work
with you to show your financial situation in other ways.
*Note: this program is open to all Marin residents regardless of citizenship
status.

Questions?
If you have questions, you can email us at RentalAssistance@MarinCounty.org, or call
415-473-2223 or CA Relay 711.
Requests for disability accommodations may be made by phoning (415) 473-2223 (Voice), CA
Relay 711 or by e-mail at RentalAssistance@MarinCounty.org.

Sharing from SCDD
Plain Language COVID Vaccine Information
What is the COVID vaccine?
The COVID vaccine is a new medication that can prevent you from getting sick with “COVID,” “the Coronavirus,” or “COVID-19.” This vaccine helps protect your body so you don’t get sick with COVID. It works by boosting your immune system. This helps the body fight COVID.   

The vaccine is given as a shot in your arm. You need to get 2 shots for the vaccine to work. The second shot is given 3 or 4 weeks after the first shot.

Right after the vaccination, some people’s arms hurt. Other people get sore muscles, a headache, a fever, or a sore throat that lasts a day or two. Some people do not get any side effects.

After the second shot, it is unlikely that you will be able to catch COVID.
Who can get the vaccine and when?
In December 2020 and January 2021, there are not enough vaccines for everyone in California. Doctors, scientists, and government leaders have worked together to decide who can get the vaccine.

Health care workers will get the vaccine first so they can keep taking care of people who are sick. Next, people who might get really sick from COVID will be able to get the vaccine. This includes many people with developmental disabilities. In California, that will be in Spring or Summer 2021.

The vaccine is going to be given in different places, such as pharmacies, hospitals, or special clinics. You might not have a choice about where to get it or who gives it to you. That is because there is not enough for everyone yet. Your service provider or doctor can tell you how your vaccine will be given.
Do I have to get the COVID vaccine?
It is your decision whether to get the vaccine or not. It is up to you to make the best choice for your health, and that may or may not be getting the vaccine.

If you have a person who makes your health decisions for you, talk with them about how you feel about getting the vaccine. Your health care provider or doctor can also answer your questions.

How does the COVID vaccine work?
A vaccine works by giving your body tools to fight viruses that can make you sick.

Those tools are called “antibodies.” Antibodies are used by your immune system to fight off viruses. Each type of virus has its own type of antibodies. That is why vaccines only work for one type of illness.

This vaccine uses a new type of technology called mRNA that teaches our bodies to fight off the coronavirus.
Is the COVID vaccine safe?
Scientists believe the COVID vaccine is generally safe. It is still new. There is a lot of information that scientists are still learning.

If you have questions or are worried about how the COVID vaccine may impact you, talk to your doctor or health care professional. Talk to the person who knows your health the best and who knows about the vaccine.
I have heard scary things about this vaccine.
There are a lot of rumors about this vaccine that are simply not true. To find out what is true, it is a good idea to talk to someone who knows the facts, like a health care professional.
How can I make a good decision about getting or not getting the vaccine?
Many people think about what might be good about taking the vaccine and what might not be good. Some questions you can think about:
  • Do you have a condition that makes it more likely for you to become very sick from COVID?
  • Do you live with, work with, or spend time with someone who is likely to become very sick from COVID?

Health problems like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer can increase your risk from COVID. Having Down Syndrome or living in a group home can increase your risk from COVID.

If you are not sure if you are at high risk, you can ask your doctor or health care provider. You can also talk to your doctor or health care provider about what the best things are for you to think about when making this decision.
Avoiding COVID Scams
There might be people who will try to scam you. Don’t fall for it!
You likely will not need to pay anything out-of-pocket to get the vaccine during this public health emergency.
You cannot pay to put your name on a list to get the vaccine.
You cannot pay to get early access to the vaccine.
You will not have anyone knocking on your door to give you the vaccine.
You will not be contacted from anyone from Medicare or the Health Department.
You will not be asked from a vaccine distribution site or health care payer, like a private insurance company for any personal information such as your Medicare number, Social Security number, or your credit card or bank account information to sign up to get the vaccine.
Not sure if it’s a scam? Talk to someone you trust like a family member, regional center service coordinator, or call your SCDD regional office.

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Marin Covid 19 Update, Beware of Fraud, Voting Privately with Accommodations is a Right, & Equity


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 30, 2020

Good Morning my Always Wonderful Marin CIL Family and Community,

I hope you are all doing well today. It is a brisk morning, which was cause for an extra cup of coffee as I write this blog this morning. As 2021 draws nigh I can’t help but think how different 2020 has been. Our society and our community has had to adapt to doing things much differently. Who would have thought that social distancing would become the mantra of the year. While during this time of year we take stock on our many accomplishments (and to think we did all of this with a pandemic) we also remember those who are experiencing hardship and everyone affected by Covid-19. I wish for a much kinder and gentler 2021 for all of us. Sending a virtual smile.


Marin County Update
COVID-19 Scams Are Out There: Protect Yourself from Fraud
According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), predatory business practices are not going away even during one of the largest public health emergencies in modern history. Officials at the federal, state and local levels are encouraging everyone to be leery of cold calls, suspicious offers for fraudulent COVID-19 tests, grants, vaccine sign-up lists or other services.
Scammers are using telemarketing calls, text messages, social media platforms, door-to-door visits and many other tactics to commit COVID-19-related scams. Fraudsters are offering COVID-19 tests, HHS grants and Medicare prescription cards in exchange for personal details, including Medicare information. These services are illegal.
Tips on How to Protect Yourself (via HHS)

  • Be vigilant and protect yourself from potential fraud concerning COVID-19 vaccines. COVID-19 vaccines are free: you will not be asked for money to enhance your ranking for vaccine eligibility. Government and State officials will not call you to obtain personal information in order to receive the vaccine, and you will not be solicited door-to-door to receive the vaccine.
  • Beneficiaries should be cautious of unsolicited requests for their personal, medical, and financial information. Medicare will not call beneficiaries to offer COVID-19 related products, services, or benefit review.
  • Be suspicious of any unexpected calls or visitors offering COVID-19 tests or supplies. If you receive a suspicious call, hang up immediately.
  • Do not respond to, or open hyperlinks in, text messages about COVID-19 from unknown individuals.
  • Ignore offers or advertisements for COVID-19 testing or treatments on social media sites. If you make an appointment for a COVID-19 test online, make sure the location is an official testing site.
  • Do not give your personal or financial information to anyone claiming to offer HHS grants related to COVID-19.
  • Be aware of scammers pretending to be COVID-19 contact tracers. Legitimate contact tracers will never ask for your Medicare number, financial information, or attempt to set up a COVID-19 test for you and collect payment information for the test.
  • If you suspect COVID-19 health care fraud, report it immediately online or call 800-HHS-TIPS (800-447-8477).
RELATED LINKS:  
State Provides Update on Regional Stay Home Order
Earlier Today, California Health and Human Services Secretary, Dr. Mark Ghaly, provided an update on COVID-19 activity across the state, California’s collective hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) capacity and the Regional State at Home Order.
WATCH ON YOUTUBE
In addition, Dr. Ghaly’s update previewed how a region is released from the Regional Stay Home Order.  For example, orders were set to expire today for both the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California regions, however, current ICU capacity for both regions is 0%. Those two regions will continue to be subject to the order’s restrictions until projections from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) show ICU capacity above or equal to 15%. CDPH’s ICU projections are calculated daily and once a region's four-week projection shows an ICU capacity of greater than or equal to 15%, the order will be lifted for that area. Therefore, while the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California regions remain under the order, Dr. Ghaly stressed that it does not mean they’ll remain under the order for the three full weeks.
The ICU capacity projections are based on four factors:
  • current estimated regional ICU capacity available
  • measure of current community transmission
  • current regional case rates
  • the proportion of ICU cases being admitted.
Decreasing community transmission and increasing the health system capacity can help a region's projected ICU capacity so they can exit the order.
The Bay Area region will remain under the Regional Stay Home Order until January 8 at the earliest with potential to extend depending on four-week ICU capacity projections.
 
New Year’s Eve: Don’t Let Substance Abuse Ruin Your Holiday
Dr. Jei Africa, Director of Behavioral Health and Recovery Services (BHRS) at the County of Marin, provides a video update regarding substance abuse trends during the COVID-19 pandemic and tips to celebrate safely during upcoming holiday weekend.
WATCH ON YOUTUBE
If you or someone you care about is increasing their use of alcohol or other substances during the COVID-19 pandemic, here are a few resources that can help answer questions and connect you to care:
  • Call Marin’s 24/7 Behavioral Health Access Line: 1-888-818-1115
  • Kaiser Permanente members can contact Kaiser’s Department of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine & Recovery Services: 415-491-3000
  • For a full listing of local substance use treatment providers, visit RxSafeMarin.org/Resources
 
Holiday Schedule for COVID-19 Updates
Some of our services will pause this week in observance of the New Year holiday. Here’s an overview:
  • COVID-19 Call Center: Closing at 1pm on Thursday, December 31; closed January 1-3, reopening Monday, January 4 at 9:30am.
  • Data and Surveillance Webpage: no updates on December 31 and January 1, but updates will resume on January 2. However, the data snapshot found on https://coronavirus.marinhhs.org homepage will continue to update every day.
  • Marin County COVID-19 Status Update: will pause on Thursday and Friday in recognition of the holiday, but will be back in your inbox on Saturday, January 2.
 
COVID-19 Data Update:
Below is a summary of today’s data now available on Marin Data & Surveillance webpage. View the page for a broader range of data, plus interactive graphs for confirmed COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths. Data analysis is available by age range, gender, race and city/town/geographic region. Questions about the data? See our Data FAQ or contact us.
 
Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal 
In today’s Independent Journal, Marin’s local newspaper, there is an interesting article about a unique program designed to address disparities low and moderate income students are experiencing during the Covid-19 pandemic. According to the article, Marin learning hubs flourish as pandemic grinds on, in response to the pandemic Marin has established 55 learning hubs. ‘’The hubs were started during distance learning so that an estimated 9,500 Marin students — those in low-income households who lacked technology, or whose parents were unable to help them — could receive the same aid as affluent students with private tutors or pandemic school pods.” One of the positives that is credited to this program is the ability to increase student engagement and an increase in overall attendance.
“There were only about 30 hubs with about 275 students when we started collecting data back in mid-October,” said Shelley Hamilton, communications director for the nonprofit Marin Promise Partnership, which is tracking the county’s learning hubs along with the Marin County Office of Education.
Since then, the number of hubs has grown to 55, “serving over 1,500 need-based students, which is about 15% of all 9,500 students living in poverty,” Hamilton said.
Of the 55 hubs, the YMCA of San Francisco and Marin is operating 16, she added. Others are being run by individual schools, libraries, nonprofits and child care centers.
In Marin City, Andy Robles, a director at the nonprofit Bridge the Gap College Prep, said his agency’s learning hub is based on students’ expressed needs.
According to Robles, Bridge the Gap plans to continue programming into the summer “so we can help students transition back to school in the fall of 2021” and help with credit recovery.
“The fallout of this remote model is not yet fully known,” Robles said. “Our goal is to help students return to in-person instruction as prepared as they possibly can be.”
To read more: Marin learning hubs flourish as pandemic grinds on

A Tidbit from Me: There has been much discussion since the pandemic began about students with disabilities experiencing significant educational disparities due to the Covid-19 pandemic. While many students have adapted to distance learning or hybrid learning models; students with disabilities and their families have reported being left behind and not able to have their disability accommodations met in the school setting during the Covid-19 pandemic. This is especially true for students who receive special education services. Marin CIL has also heard from students and families who have experienced some of the same educational disparities due to Covid-19. If you are a student with a disability, parent, or a family member of someone experiencing difficulties receiving special education service and supports or other disability accommodations in the school setting Marin CIL wants to hear from you. Please reach out to us.

Sharing from Disability Rights Advocates
Blind Hoosiers File Lawsuit Against the Indiana Election Commission and the Secretary of State
December 3, 2020 – Indianapolis, IN – The ability to vote privately and independently is a fundamental right and an essential component of democracy in the United States. However, in Indiana, these rights are not guaranteed to all voters. In fact, Indiana has one of the most restrictive absentee voting systems in the country for blind voters because it only permits them to vote at home by appointment with a “traveling board” of elections officials.  Hoosier voters who are blind or have low vision could easily vote privately and independently at home using electronic tools.  Instead, they are being forced to choose between giving up their right to vote privately and independently, risk exposing themselves to COVID-19 at the polls, or not voting at all. Click here to read the complaint.
In a lawsuit filed today in federal district court in the Southern District of Indiana, plaintiffs Rita Kersh, Kristin Fleschner, and Wanda Tackett, joined by the Indiana Protection and Advocacy Services Commission and American Council of the Blind of Indiana, assert that the Indiana Election Commission and the Secretary of State are discriminating against voters who are blind or have low vision by not offering the necessary accommodations that these voters need to vote privately and independently when using the absentee vote-by-mail program.
For full article: Blind Hoosiers File Lawsuit Against the Indiana Election Commission and the Secretary of State
A Tidbit from Me:  More than thirty years after the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act it is hard for me to believe people with disabilities still have to fight so hard for what should be and is a basic right. The right to vote is sacred. Everyone should have the right to vote privately and have the accommodations they need to make the voting process a truly accessible experience. This is an issue of equity and rights. As a person who is a power-wheelchair user I remember when many polling places were not accessible and in some places I couldn’t get in to the building and had to vote outside (sometimes in inclement weather). As a much younger adult there were no accessible voting machines, I am unable to write with a pen and someone from the elections department would have to assist me in marking my ballot. Much has changed since years ago. We have accessible voting machines and election officials are working to ensure that people with disabilities have a more accessible voting experience. This case filed by DRA is a reminder, we still have much more to do. In the immortal words of President George H.W. Bush “Let the shameful walls of exclusion finally come tumbling down”. Our work continues…

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

Covid 19 Updates and More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 29, 2020

Good Morning my Marin CIL Family and Community,
I hope you are all doing well today. Once again I was up before revelry. A lot happening in our world. Today’s PM report primarily focuses on Covid 19 related updates. Wishing you all the very best sending you a virtual smile.

Sharing from CDCAN
DECEMBER 27, 2020 - FEDERAL UPDATE
PRESIDENT SIGNS $900 BILLION CORONAVIRUS RELIEF PACKAGE TIED TO $1.4 TRILLION TO FUND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2021 - MEASURES TAKE EFFECT IMMEDIATELY
Congress Will Take Up Vote on Monday (December 28th) on New Legislation to Increase Stimulus Checks to $2,000 - But Prospects for Passage Are Uncertain With Key US Senate Republicans Opposed

SACRAMENTO, CA [BY MARTY OMOTO, CDCAN LAST UPDATED  12/27/2020 11:30 PM PACIFIC TIME] - After several days of threatening a veto, President Trump signed late Sunday afternoon (December 27th) the $1.4 trillion federal government funding measure and the $900 billion coronavirus relief funding package, averting a government shutdown, and continues several critical COVID-19 relief programs including stimulus checks and additional federal unemployment benefits.
     The bill was signed by the president after the additional federal unemployment benefit program expired Saturday evening (after 11:59 PM), and it is not clear yet what the states need to do to resume that temporary program. 
    President Trump, despite threats in the past few days of a veto, signed the $2.3 trillion spending package from his Mar-a-Lago private club in Palm Beach, Florida.
    The relief legislation includes direct payments of $600 per adult and per child. The amount per adult is half the $1,200 payments that were provided under the CARES Act enacted in March (see below for link to that and the other COVID_19 relief funding bills), but the amount per child is slightly larger than the $500 allowed under that law.
    Two expiring CARES Act programs, Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, which made benefits available to the self-employed and gig economy workers, and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation, which provided additional weeks of benefits, were extended for 11 weeks, averting a fiscal crisis for tens of millions of Americans.
    The spending bill also includes $284 billion in funding for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), which provided distressed small businesses with forgivable loans to keep them afloat and leave employees on the books.
    Meanwhile, the US House of Representatives controlled by Democrats, will vote on Monday (December 28th) on new legislation that would increase the $600 in the coronavirus relief-government funding package to $2,000, an amount supported by Trump and Democratic leaders - but opposed by many key Republican Congressional leaders. That increase will likely pass the US House - controlled by Democrats - but face an extremely steep hill to win passage in the US Senate where key Senate Republicans remain opposed.
    CDCAN NOTE: To receive the free CDCAN Reports, send email request to Marty Omoto (with "CDCAN Reports Subscribe" in the subject line) to: martyomoto@att.net

Legislation is Fifth Coronavirus Relief Bill
    The relief package signed into law by President Trump, is the fifth coronavirus relief bill since April when it passed the 4th relief bill (HR 266 - the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act).
    The US House did pass on May 15, 2020 (by a largely party-line vote of 208 to 199) the  $3 trillion "Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions Act" or Heroes Act  - HR 6800) - but the bill was blocked from any hearing or votes in the US Senate by US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnel (Republican - Kentucky).
    The sweeping agreement came after days of around-the-clock talks to reach a deal on funding the government and as leadership faced growing pressure from rank-and-file members from both parties in both houses to pass at least some coronavirus help before the end of the year. The agreement nearly was derailed with last minute demands by President Trump and a threat to veto the entire spending package which would have meant a government shutdown and expiration of key COVID-19 funding programs. 

Trump Demands Congress Rescinds Some Spending Provisions and Increase Stimulus Checks
    "I will sign the Omnibus and COVID package with a strong message that makes clear to Congress that wasteful items need to be removed," Trump said in a statement upon signing the spending bill "I will send back to Congress a redlined version, item by item, accompanied by the formal rescission request to Congress insisting that those funds be removed from the bill."
    Presidents do not have the power or authority to blue pencil or line item veto items in a spending bill - unlike some governors - including California -who can reduce or eliminate levels of spending not required by state or federal law.  
    President Trump's "formal rescission" request that Congress rescind some of the spending in the funding package, will likely be ignored by Congress . The spending amounts and provisions in the bill were part of a deal reached December 20th (Sunday evening) by House and US Senate Democrats, Republicans and the White House (as represented by US Treasury Secretary Mnuchin).  

Congress Passed the Coronavirus Relief and Spending Bill Last Week on December 21st
    Congress last week (December 21st) passed the $1.4 trillion bill to fund the federal government at current levels through the end of the federal budget year (September 31, 2021) and the fifth coronavirus relief bill that provides over $900 billion in coronavirus relief. 
    The US Senate passed the bill late Monday evening on December 21st by a vote of 92 to 6 (the vote was not yet final at the writing of this report).. 
     US House passed the measure earlier on Monday evening (December 21st), with House Democratic leaders dividing the spending package to allow for two separate votes: 
     The first vote in the US House featured funding for several key federal agencies — including the Pentagon and Department of Homeland Security, that the House passed by a vote of 327 to 85, with the no votes split virtually evenly between Republicans and Democrats.
     The second vote in the House earlier Monday evening (December 21st)  combined funding for the remaining federal government agencies along with the COVID-19 relief funding, passing that by a vote of 359 to 53, with the opposition coming largely from conservative Republicans who were opposed to the enormous spending in the COVID-19 bill and its impact on the deficit.
  . 
Major Provisions Not In the Bill
    As previously reported last week by CDCAN, major funding for state and local governments - a major priority for Democrats -  and liability protections  - a major priority for Republicans - were left out of the agreement in order to break the stalemate and allow a much smaller relief bill to move forward. Democrats argue that more relief legislation will need to be enacted once President-elect Joe Biden takes office on January 20th, though Republicans are already resisting that idea.
    Senate Majority Leader McConnell said Monday evening that he will "insist" that any COVID-19 relief next year - when the Biden Administration will take office - must include protections against coronavirus-related lawsuits.
    "I think liability relief is really important," McConnell said during an interview on Fox News. "And if there is another coronavirus relief bill after the first of the year, I'm going to insist that liability protection for these universities and health care providers is a part of it."

What the Coronavirus Relief Bill Contains
    The following, compiled by CDCAN, are the major provisions of the over $900 billion coronavirus relief bill that Congress passed (December 21st) and that President Trump signed into law on Sunday (December 27, 2020). Both houses would have to approve any increase in the stimulus checks that Trump said he wanted, a prospect - at this moment in time -  seems unlikely in the Republican controlled US Senate. : 

  • STIMULUS CHECKS: A second round of direct payments to Americans. The payments will be up to $600 per adult and per child. The amount per adult is half the $1,200 payments that were provided under the CARES Act enacted in March, but the amount per child is slightly larger than the $500 allowed under that law.  The bill will allow US citizens who are in households that also include non-citizens to receive the payments. With the first round of payments, U.S. citizens married to people who do not have work-eligible Social Security numbers generally could not receive a payment if the couple filed a joint return.  As with the first round, the new payments will only be sent to people below a certain income level. It took two weeks after that bill was passed for the IRS to start distributing the money -- but some eligible recipients still haven't received it, months later.
  • UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS: Two expiring CARES Act programs, the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, which made benefits available to the self-employed and gig economy workers, and the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation, which provided additional weeks of benefits, were extended for 11 weeks, just before both programs were set to expire.
        That timeline will set another key deadline to stop the programs from expiring in early March. In addition, the bill adds $300 to all weekly unemployment benefits, half the amount that supplemented benefits from April through July. Workers who rely on multiple jobs and have lost income will also be eligible for a weekly $100 boost as well.
    SMALL BUSINESS - PAYCHECK PROTECTION PROGRAM: The Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), which provided small businesses with forgivable loans to keep them afloat and leave employees on the books, was included in the bill, with $284 billion in funds.  Businesses that already received a PPP loan will be eligible to get a second one under the new terms. Some of the PPP funds will be set aside for the smallest businesses and community-based lenders.
  • COVID-19 VACCINE AND COVID-19 TESTING: The relief bill includes $20 billion for the purchase of vaccines, $8 billion for vaccine distribution, $20 billion for states to conduct testing and $20 billion in extra federal relief for health-care providers. 
  • HOUSING RENTAL ASSISTANCE: The bill extends the eviction moratorium that is set to expire at the end of the year through the end of January.  The legislation includes $25 billion for rental assistance to families facing eviction. Eligible renters would be able to receive assistance with rent and utility payments, and bills that have accumulated since the start of the pandemic, by applying with entities that state and local grantees chose to administer the program. The relief bill includes an enhancement of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit to increase the supply for affordable housing construction. 
  • EDUCATION: The bill includes several provisions relating to elementary, secondary and higher education and would provide $82 billion of funds for schools and colleges to help them re-open classrooms and prevent coronavirus transmission. Includes an expansion of Pell Grants. House Democrats said that the expansion would allow 500,000 people to become new recipients of the grants and 1.5 million students to get the maximum benefit. 
  • CHILDCARE: An additional $10 billion is included to support child care providers that have struggled because of the pandemic.
  • NUTRITION ASSISTANCE: The relief bill directs $13 billion to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps), and to child nutrition benefits, to pay for a 15% increase in SNAP benefits. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) language does not expand eligibility for the program and requires the secretary of Agriculture to provide reports on participation rates and unspent funding balances. 
  • TRANSPORTATION: The relief bill provided $45 billion for transportation, including $16 billion for another round of support for airlines, airline employees and contractors, $14 billion for transit systems, $10 billion for highways, $2 billion for intercity buses, $2 billion for airports and $1 billion for Amtrak.  
  • "SURPRISE" MEDICAL BILLS:  The relief bill includes provisions to end the practice of surprise medical billing. It would hold patients harmless from surprise bills, including from air ambulance providers and prohibit out-of-network providers from “balance billing” unless they give patients 72-hour notice of their network status and an estimate of the charges. 
  • TAX PROVISIONS: The relief bill contains several tax provisions in the bill, targeted both at individuals and businesses. The bill would allow taxpayers to use their 2019 income for purposes of claiming the earned income tax credit and child tax credit, two credits that benefit low- and middle-income households. This will allow households where people lost jobs or income in 2020 to be eligible for credits or receive larger credits, because the credit amounts phase in with income.
    The relief bill would boost the tax deductibility of business meals for two years (a priority for the White House). The provision would also extend and enhance the employee retention tax credit, a payroll tax credit aimed at encouraging businesses to hold on to their workers.  
  • FINANCIAL:  The deal provides $9 billion in emergency Treasury capital investments for Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) and Minority Depository Institutions (MDIs), financial institutions that largely cater to minorities, as well as an additional $3 billion for CDFIs through a Treasury fund. It also provides $20 billion in Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) grants for smaller businesses. Additionally, it includes $15 billion in grants dedicated to live venues. 
        The expense-deductibility issue was one of the last issues to be resolved before lawmakers and the White House finalized an agreement. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle argued that they intended for expenses to be tax-deductible in the CARES Act, but US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin argued that deductibility would amount to double-dipping because PPP loan forgiveness isn’t considered taxable income.
  • FEDERAL RESERVE: The bill includes language negotiated by US Senator Pat Toomey (Republican - Pennsylvania) and US Senate Minority Schumer to end the expansion of the Federal Reserve’s lending authority, which Congress enacted through the CARES Act in March. Specifically, new language will close four Federal Reserve lending facilities: the Primary Market Corporate Credit Facility, the Secondary Market Corporate Credit Facility, the Main Street Lending Program and the Municipal Credit Facility. Unspent funding for those programs under the CARES Act will be repurposed.
A Tidbit from Me: This important Covid relief package, while it doesn’t contain everything that disability advocates were pushing for it is still widely seen as a win for our community including increased funds for transportation, food security, funding for Covid vaccine distribution, and eviction protections. People with disabilities are one of the first groups affected by any economic downturn and this relief package keeps important funding for many safety-net programs.  
Sharing from the Office of Governor Gavin Newsom
Governor Newsom Announces Partnership with CVS and Walgreens to Provide Pfizer Vaccines to Residents and Staff in Long-Term Care Facilities
Published: Dec 28, 2020
 
Federal partnership will provide no-cost Pfizer vaccines to residents and staff in long-term care facilities 
SACRAMENTO – Governor Gavin Newsom today announced that California has opted in to the federal COVID-19 Pharmacy Partnership. At no cost to the state or local government, CVS and Walgreens will administer the Pfizer vaccine to residents and staff in long-term care facilities. Starting today, CVS and Walgreens will start with nursing homes, which will take an estimated 3-4 weeks, and then vaccinate staff and residents in assisted living, residential care and other long-term care facilities.
“Vaccinating those most vulnerable among us is critical to fighting this virus,” said Governor Newsom. “By leveraging CVS and Walgreens resources, we can effectively deploy vaccines to residents and staff at our long-term care facilities, which are at higher risk of Covid transmission – and do it at no cost to the state or local government.”
The program will enable counties to leverage CVS and Walgreens pharmacy staff to administer the vaccine more broadly with pharmacy staff going directly to care facilities. Skilled Nursing Facilities will receive vaccine from staff from CVS and Walgreens. Approximately 499 nursing homes will be provided vaccine by CVS and 357 by Walgreens. The vaccines will be administered by pharmacists, pharmacy technicians and nurses. Pharmacy technicians are participating under a recent waiver by the Board of Pharmacy that requires appropriate supervision under California law and specialized training.
“This partnership is an opportunity to augment other vaccination efforts at the local level to prioritize our most vulnerable Californians where we are seeing the most outbreaks, hospitalizations, and deaths,” said Dr. Erica Pan, Interim State Public Health Officer. “The partnership also allows us to continue to vaccinate other high priority individuals such as our front-line health care workers who are critical to our ongoing response to a surge of cases.”
Specifically, the program:
  • Schedules and coordinates on-site vaccine clinic dates directly with each facility. Pharmacy staff will visit each facility several times to ensure that all residents and employees who wish to be vaccinated get the vaccine.
  • Orders vaccines and associated supplies (e.g. syringes, needles, personal protective equipment).
  • Ensures cold storage for the vaccine.
  • Provides on-site administration of the vaccine to all residents and staff.
 Source: Governor Newsom Announces Partnership with CVS and Walgreens to Provide Pfizer Vaccines to Residents and Staff in Long-Term Care Facilities

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Here’s who will be next in line to receive California’s coronavirus vaccines
The next rollout will be to a mix of the elderly and essential workers
By MAGGIE ANGST | mangst@bayareanewsgroup.com | Bay Area News Group
PUBLISHED: December 28, 2020 at 3:57 p.m. | UPDATED: December 29, 2020 at 6:02 a.m.
As California’s public health providers brace for another nightmarish surge of COVID-19 cases and deaths, state officials are refining the list of who will be next in line to receive a coveted vaccine over the coming weeks.
Under the latest plan unveiled by Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday, the next phase will include a mix of people at least 75 years old and some essential workers — a proposal slated to protect those at the greatest risk of dying while also aiming to help schools and businesses return to a semblance of normalcy in the wake of nearly a year of disruptions.
The plan falls in line with recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and marks a slight diversion from last week, when the group in charge of deciding how the state should divvy up its limited supply of vaccines was leaning toward delaying protections for the state’s elderly residents and giving top priority to its expansive number of essential workers.
Expected to be finalized by the state’s Drafting Guidelines Workgroup and released in detail on Wednesday, the plan will guide the state’s rollout of a second round of vaccines following those first reserved for California’s 2.4 million health care workers and patients in skilled nursing facilities.
For full Article: Here’s who will be next in line to receive California’s coronavirus vaccines

Marin among state leaders in November voter participation
By CALMATTERS |PUBLISHED: December 28, 2020 at 5:28 p.m. | UPDATED: December 28, 2020 at 5:34 p.m.
By Lewis Griswold
Nine of ten registered voters cast ballots in two northern California counties, making them the state’s highest turnout counties in the November 2020 election.
Sonoma County had the highest turnout at 90.49% of registered voters. Marin shared the same stratosphere at 90.25%, according to statistics from the Secretary of State’s Office.
The statewide average? 81%.
While Northern California claims the record turnout among California’s 58 counties, a CalMatters analysis of the state’s 12 most populated counties revealed a precinct in Sun City Palm Desert, a retirement community in Southern California, that boasts a voter turnout of about 96%.
Sonoma County has plenty of residents but it’s not in the top 12. A check with Sonoma County elections officials to find the highest turnout precinct that had at least 1,000 voters revealed Precinct 1111, with 1,097 registered voters, achieved a whopping 96.72% turnout.
Nearby, a precinct in the Oakmont area of Santa Rosa with 2,210 registered voters came in a close second at 96.33% turnout.
Like much of the greater Bay Area, precinct 1111 voted for President-elect Joe Biden in a big way: 71% Biden to 27% President Donald Trump, with other candidates getting the remainder.
The precinct is in the hilly Rincon Valley area of northeast Santa Rosa. Santa Rosa City Councilwoman Victoria Fleming’s district includes the precinct. It escaped the Tubbs Fire devastation, but wildfire worries remain top of mind for residents, Fleming said.
For full Article: Marin among state leaders in November voter participation
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL believes in the power of the disability vote. As part of our participation with the Disability Organizing Network, the American Association of People with Disabilities, and the Marin County Election Advisory Committee Marin CIL works to ensure that the entire voting experience is truly accessible to people with disabilities. To learn more about the importance of the disability voting block or to get involved with Marin CIL’s voting advocacy project please feel free to reach out to us
 

Back from Vacation, President Trump Signs Stimulus Legislation Funds May Stop Transit Layoffs & More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 28, 2020

Good Morning my Marin CIL Community and Family,
I hope you are all doing well today and were able to get some rest over the holidays. It was a quiet Christmas, gathering with family in our bubble, which included a conference call with my brother Michael. I caught up on some rest, which I thoroughly enjoyed. We enjoyed chocolate and sugar cookies from family friends and we watched a movie "Jingle, Jangle, and Things".....a wonderful movie that I whole-heartedly recommend. Below is the PM Report for you. Sending each of you a virtual smile this morning. Happy Monday!

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin judge might let San Quentin inmates relocate over virus
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: December 26, 2020 at 11:36 a.m. | UPDATED: December 26, 2020 at 4:51 p.m.
A Marin County judge might soon begin ordering the transfer of San Quentin State Prison inmates to other prisons in response to a wave of coronavirus safety complaints.
Some inmates, however, might prefer to remain where they are if they can’t be released. Charles Carbone, a prisoner rights lawyer in San Francisco, said that is because “right now everywhere else is hotter than San Quentin.”
As of Saturday, there were 9,155 active coronavirus cases among inmates at California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation sites throughout the state. Ten prisons had 500 or more cases, but San Quentin had just four, the third least of any prison in the state.
“We are in COVID freefall in our prisons,” Carbone said. “The numbers are just skyrocketing. There is no end in sight.”
The situation at San Quentin, however, has changed dramatically since the summer. Coronavirus infections at the prison began to climb dramatically in June after 121 inmates were transferred there from the California Institution for Men in Chino, where an outbreak was already underway. It was later revealed that the inmates who were transferred were tested for the virus, but not close to the transfer date.
Cases at San Quentin exploded, reaching their height at around 1,413 on July 8. Eventually, 2,152 of San Quentin’s population of 2,763 inmates would contract the virus, and 28 would die, more than at any other prison in the state. Nevertheless, by Aug. 7 there were only seven active cases at San Quentin.
Regarding San Quentin’s low case count now, Carbone said, “That is what happens when you get two-thirds of the population infected.”
During the summer, when the virus was still spreading rapidly at San Quentin, inmates there began filing petitions with the court. The inmates asserted that their continued incarceration during the severe outbreak violated the Eighth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, which prohibits “cruel and unusual punishment.”
For full article: Marin judge might let San Quentin inmates relocate over virus
A Tidbit from Me: The disability community and Centers for Independent Living have been paying particular attention to the outbreak of Covid-19 in California’s prison system. According to the Sacramento Bee, “More than half of the California prison inmates who’ve died after contracting the coronavirus as of early this week had disabilities known to the state corrections department” Article: About half of California prison inmates killed by COVID-19 were disabled, advocates say
The Independent Living Movement considers all people with disabilities living in institutional settings, including correctional institutions, our brothers and sisters. Meaning, regardless of what offenses they may have committed their rights must be respected including their right to access quality medical care. To learn more about this important civil rights issue please reach out to us.

Relief bill might stop Golden Gate Bridge district layoffs
By WILL HOUSTON | whouston@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: December 22, 2020 at 1:26 p.m. | UPDATED: December 22, 2020 at 5:56 p.m.
Nearly 150 Bay Area bus and ferry workers facing layoffs in less than two weeks might be keeping their jobs after a new federal coronavirus relief package was sent to President Donald Trump’s desk on Tuesday.
In response to the $900 billion relief package, the governing board for the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District is set to meet on Wednesday to consider rescinding its Nov. 13 decision to lay off 146 bus and ferry employees and to cut pay by 10% for its managers, administrators and board members through furloughs.
“We’re thrilled,” said Denis Mulligan, the district’s general manager. “It’s a welcome lifeline and it couldn’t have happened any later.”
Shane Weinstein, president of the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1575 that represents about 250 bus drivers with the district, said the meeting came as “very welcome news” to the many workers who face losing their jobs in less than two weeks.
“I just know that this right here is going to be able to give us some more time and more space for the vaccine to take effect,” Weinstein said.
The new coronavirus stimulus package includes $14 billion for mass transit, of which about $975 million is expected to go to Bay Area transit agencies, according to the Metropolitan Transportation Commission.
For full article: Relief bill might stop Golden Gate Bridge district layoffs
A Tidbit from Me: This is wonderful news for the disability community. Golden Gate transit serves the 101 corridor from Santa Rosa to San Francisco and also connects with El Cerrito BART. People with disabilities and older adults are more dependent on public transportation to live, work, and recreate in their communities. Marin CIL is a member of the Golden Gate Bridge Highway and Transportation District Accessibility Advisory Committee. The role of the Accessibility Advisory Committee is to provide technical assistance to Golden Gate Bridge’ staff and Board of Directors to ensure that the district bus and ferry system is accessible and useable by all people with disabilities. The next meeting of the ACA is January 14, 2021 1:30 pm.  For further information regarding the ACA, call Jon Gaffney, ADA Compliance and Program Manager, at (415) 257-4416 or email jgaffney@goldengate.org.  Feel free to reach out to Marin CIL if you need support or need more information about accessible transit options in Marin County and North Bay.

Sharing from the ARC of California

The California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) is requesting your assistance and guidance in updating its Office of Access and Functional Needs (OAFN) Library.
The purpose of OAFN is to identify the needs of individuals with disabilities and others with access and functional needs before, during and after disasters and to integrate them into the State’s emergency management systems.
OAFN utilizes a whole community approach by offering training and guidance to emergency managers and planners, disability advocates and other service providers responsible for planning for, responding to and helping communities recover from disasters. In short, OAFN plans for the realities of disasters by integrating access and functional needs into everything Cal OES does including partnership development, outreach, training, guidance and providing technical assistance.
The OAFN provides resources to support this effort, that are industry best practices, and aims to be the “go to” resource for emergency managers and planners.
Do you know of a resource that you would like to see ADDED or UPDATED on the OAFN Library (https://www.caloes.ca.gov/individuals-families/access-functional-needs/afn-library)?
Please submit your recommendations here: https://bit.ly/3peJD3y.
Email any questions to Janlia Riley at janlia@constantassociates.com, or call (424) 320-2583.
Source: Office of Access and Functional Needs (OAFN) Library

Sharing from the National Low-Income Housing Coalition
Statement from NLIHC President and CEO Diane Yentel on the COVID Relief Bill with Emergency Relief for Renters Signed into Law by President Trump
Dec 28, 2020
WASHINGTON, DC – President Trump signed last night, December 27, the coronavirus relief bill passed by Congress last week that will provide immediate and essential relief to millions of struggling renters, preventing tens of millions of people from losing their homes in January. The new law extends the CDC’s federal eviction moratorium through January 31, keeping struggling renters housed and preventing further spread of and deaths from COVID-19, and includes $25 billion in emergency rental assistance. The law also extends the spending deadline for certain coronavirus relief funds, some of which are allocated for rental assistance.
The CDC eviction moratorium was set to expire on Dec. 31. At that time, renters will owe an estimated $30B to $70B in back rent, more than they can possibly pay off. If the president had not signed the bill into law with an extension of the eviction moratorium, tens of millions of people would have been at risk of losing their homes with catastrophic consequences – for children, families, communities, and our country’s ability to contain the pandemic. Increased evictions would have led to increased spread of, and potentially deaths from, COVID-19.
For full Statement: Statement from NLIHC President and CEO Diane Yentel on the COVID Relief Bill with Emergency Relief for Renters Signed into Law by President Trump
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL is working with our partners Legal Aid of Marin, Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California, and the Marin Organizing Committee to create more opportunities for accessible and affordable housing in Marin. During the Covid-19 pandemic Marin CIL has been working together with our community organization partners, people with disabilities, older adults, and public officials to identify disparities impacting underserved communities. In response the Marin County Board of Supervisors has approved an emergency resolution to prevent residents, families, and business owners from being evicted because of a sudden loss of income tied to the Covid-19 pandemic. This ban is in effect countywide in every city, town, and unincorporated area of Marin County. The ordinance was extended through September 2020. Additionally, Marin Health and Human Services, with the direction of the Marin County Board of Supervisors, has launched the Emergency Rental Assistance Program. This program supports people who are at risk of homelessness and need rental assistance to prevent eviction due to a loss of income from the COVID-19 pandemic. The Marin County Board of Supervisors and the Marin Community Foundation have joined together to provide $2 million in rental assistance to residents whose livelihoods have been affected by the Coronavirus pandemic. To learn more about Marin CIL’s initiatives that support the availability of accessible, affordable housing for our communities please feel free to reach out to us.
 

Happy Holidays! Information about Important Rental Assistance Program, Learning how to Staycation


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 21, 2020

Good Morning, my Marin CIL community and family!
I hope you are all doing well today. This week, the PM Report will be paused for the Holidays. Yours truly is trying to remember how to take a vacation. My family tells me this is a skill that I really need to master.
I want to wish everyone Happy Holidays. Please be safe. Stay home. Wear a mask.  Enjoy time with your bubble and visiting relatives and friends remotely.
Many people. Especially during the Holidays, are facing housing insecurity and access to basic  resources. I wanted to share some important information on the Marin County Emergency Rental Assistance Program. 
The program is currently open and accepting applicants. If you or anyone you know needs emergency rental assistance, there are three easy steps to apply. 

  1. Call 415 473 2223 to be added to the waitlist.  If no one answers leave your name and number in a message.
  2.  Someone  on the staff will reach out to you.
  3. Once your intake is complete, you will be asked to submit information.
For more information, please click here:  https://www.marincounty.org/depts/cd/divisions/housing/renter-and-landlord-resources

Wishing you all the very best and see you in the PM report after the Holidays!
 

Covid 19 Info Update, Equity in Vaccine Access, Happy Holidays, and More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 18, 2020

Good Morning my Incredibly Fantastic Marin CIL Family in Community,

I hope you are all doing well this morning. I thoroughly enjoyed our virtual holiday party with my Marin CIL family yesterday. It was fun sharing family holiday stories and breaking bread during this pivotal time in our history. 2020 transformed and affected all of us and caused us as individuals and as an agency to adapt to a new way of doing what we do….keeping Marin CIL’s mission and vision at the forefront of everything we do. Wishing you all a wonderful day. Sending a virtual smile your way. Happy Holidays to you, your family, and community.

Sharing from the County of Marin
More Free COVID-19 Testing on its Way in Marin
County partners with Curative to collect self-administered oral swab test
San Rafael, CA – Free COVID-19 testing by oral swab is coming to Marin County. Five rotating locations will offer coronavirus testing by online appointment for anybody, whether insured or not, as early as December 21.
The County of Marin has partnered with Curative, which offers a novel coronavirus test that has a higher clinical sensitivity than nasal cavity swab tests. The simple, painless test is self-collected, and results are returned within 48 hours by email or text. To date, Curative has distributed more than 5 million test results nationwide and is processing about 70,000 test kits per day with plenty of capacity.
Local test collection locations will rotate around Marin County, and online appointments via the Curative website will be available beginning four days before opening day at each location.
Here’s the schedule:

  • Mondays, starting December 21: Bolinas Fire Station, 100 Mesa Road, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; San Geronimo Valley Community Center, 6350 Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, 2-4 p.m.
  • Tuesdays, starting December 22: United Market, 100 Red Hill Avenue, San Anselmo, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Wednesdays, starting January 5: Sausalito City Hall, 420 Litho Street, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Thursdays, starting January 6: Piper Park, 250 Doherty Drive, Larkspur, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Fridays, starting January 7: Novato Library, 1720 Novato Boulevard, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Curative was founded to develop sepsis tests in January 2020 and pivoted to COVID-19 in early March 2020, addressing the urgent need for test development and production. Curative’s test involves having a person cough first, releasing the aerosols from the upper and lower respiratory tracts. The patient swabs saliva from the inside of the cheek and the roof of the mouth, then seals the swab in a secure container and returns it to a medical professional to be sent to a lab. The test is done without the test recipient coming into close contact with others, eliminating the need for frequent personal protective equipment (PPE) changes. 
Since testing began for COVID-19 last winter, 228,590 tests have been recorded in Marin County (counting multiple tests by a single person) and 6,561 have come back positive. Residents should be aware of their options for testing as case counts rise. An updated list of local testing locations is on the Marin County Public Health website.
In addition to the new Curative testing locations, residents can access testing through offices of health care providers, dedicated test sites, and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved home testing kits. Mail-in home testing options are gaining in popularity as a convenient alternative to traveling to a testing site. Families with returning college-aged students can have a test waiting at home.
Anyone seeking a COVID-19 test should first contact a health care provider. Most providers now offer testing for their patients and are required to do so under California public health regulations.
The Public Health Division of Marin County Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) offers the following considerations for who should get tested.
  • Those who have symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Those who have had close contact[External] (within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more) with someone with confirmed COVID-19.
  • Those who have been asked or referred to get testing by a health care provider, local health department[External] or state health department[External].
  • Essential workers who have regular contact with the public should be tested up to monthly whether or not they have symptoms.
Source: More Free COVID-19 Testing on its Way in Marin


Sharing from the California Department of Public Health
California Department of Public Health Announces Membership in the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee to Ensure Equity in COVID-19 Vaccine Access
Committee Members Advise State on Advancing the Principles of Safety, Equity and Transparency in COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution and Allocation
Date: November 23, 2020
Number: NR20-311
Contact: CDPHpress@cdph.ca.gov
SACRAMENTO – Today, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) announced membership in the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee with broad representation from organizations throughout California to provide input into the distribution and allocation of the COVID-19 vaccine. The committee will help guide the state's decision making and build equity into decisions about vaccine distribution and allocation.
"While the COVID-19 vaccine is new, we are not starting our planning process from scratch. This is an area of expertise we have strong partnerships in, building on lessons learned from previous vaccination campaigns, including H1NI and seasonal flu," said Governor Newsom. "We've been planning and thinking about this for months, and we are being guided by some of the world's best experts in this field."
California is leveraging its well-established existing immunization framework and emergency response infrastructure to coordinate efforts between state, local, and territorial authorities to distribute and administer the vaccine.  
The Community Vaccine Advisory Committee will build on the work of the Scientific Safety Review Work Group and the Drafting Guidelines Work Group. The Committee will provide input and feedback for the ongoing planning and engagement efforts to ensure equitable vaccine distribution and allocation. In the beginning, vaccine supplies will be limited and will be distributed to those at highest risk.
"We must work together to ensure that vulnerable Californians, those most at risk, have equitable access to the vaccine," said Dr. Erica Pan, Acting State Public Health Officer. "All of our preparations for the vaccine are guided by the need for safety, equity and transparency in the process. The members of the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee will provide critical input to ensure we are making the best possible decisions representing broad stakeholder perspectives." 
For More Information: California Department of Public Health Announces Membership in the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee to Ensure Equity in COVID-19 Vaccine Access

Community Vaccine Advisory Committee
The Community Vaccine Advisory Committee is providing input and feedback to the planning efforts and resolving barriers to equitable vaccine implementation and decision-making.
Upcoming Meetings
Date: Wednesday, December 23, 2020
Time: 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Access Information:
  • English Toll free: 844-721-7237
  • English Access Code:  2243784
  • Spanish Toll-Free: 877-402-9753
     
  • Spanish Access Code: 1424990
     
  • Live stream via YouTube
FUTURE MEETING DATES: 
  • Wednesday, Jan 6, 2021
  • Wednesday, Jan 20, 2021
  • Wednesday, Feb 3, 2021
  • Wednesday, Feb 17, 2021

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal

Bay Area transit agencies get tool to prevent layoffs
By WILL HOUSTON | whouston@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: December 15, 2020 at 12:41 p.m. | UPDATED: December 18, 2020 at 8:25 a.m.
Bay Area public transit providers got the green light to divert money usually reserved for projects to help stave off layoffs and service cuts until a new federal stimulus package arrives.
The new policy approved by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission on Wednesday allows, but does not require, transit operators such as BART, San Francisco Muni and Golden Gate Transit to use Federal Transit Administration grants to keep transit workers on their payrolls and buses, trains and ferries moving. The grants are typically reserved for projects such as regular maintenance, building new stations or replacing old buses, trains and ferries.
The new policy comes after a coalition of transit workers, unions and supporters urged the commission last month to divert at least $100 million in Federal Transit Administration funds to prevent layoffs.
For full Article: Bay Area transit agencies get tool to prevent layoffs

Marin begins coronavirus vaccinations at nursing homes
By MATTHEW PERA | mpera@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: December 17, 2020 at 5:37 p.m. | UPDATED: December 18, 2020 at 6:54 a.m.
Maria Cortez waited in line early Thursday morning in the chilly air outside The Tamalpais senior living center in Greenbrae to become one of the first nursing home workers to get vaccinated against the coronavirus in Marin.
Cortez, who is a nursing assistant at the center, has spent the past nine months wearing safety gear at work, getting frequent coronavirus tests and limiting her exposure to others. But despite all the precautions, she worries constantly about catching the virus and passing it on to the patients she works with, or to her three children at home.
“It’s really stressful,” she said. “I was so excited to get the vaccine.”
Marin County health officials arrived at The Tamalpais just after 7 a.m. Thursday with dozens of doses of Pfizer’s vaccine, which were part of the first batch that arrived in the county Wednesday morning. When they left four hours later, more than half of the center’s 191 employees had been inoculated.
For full Article: Marin begins coronavirus vaccinations at nursing homes


Sharing from NCIL Elevate Blog
Elevate Blog: Rajah Sandor on Being a Disabled Campaign Staffer
December 16, 2020 By theadvocacymonitor Leave a Comment
In October 2020, we sat down with Rajah Sandor to learn about his experiences as a disabled campaign professional, his successes, obstacles he has faced, and advice he has for other disabled people who want to work on campaigns.
Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you become a campaign professional, and what do you do now?
My name is D. Rajah Sandor, I go by Rajah. I’ve almost completed my 31st year, I’m Indian, and I was born without arms. I definitely came to campaigns later than the typical staffer does, I was 27 the first time I was a paid organizer. I got involved in a local mayoral election in 2015 but did not truly start with campaigns until the primary of 2016. By the end of the primary, I had essentially become a volunteer organizer which got me an interview to be an organizer with the PA coordinated campaign. And that was really it. Campaigns have a very addictive nature to them and so as long as the next gig appeared, I’d take it. Over the last 4 years, I have worked on every type of race except a U.S. Senate, and have served as an organizer, a department head, and as the campaign manager. I am currently the Western Regional Director of the Pennsylvania Senate Democratic Campaign Committee and have been since July.
Why do you think it is important for people with disabilities to volunteer or work on campaigns? 
  1. I think the more people with disabilities that interact with campaigns, the more we normalize it.
  2. By being involved in campaigns, you present the opportunity for the candidate to understand disability issues better.
  3. To force these spaces to become more accessible. Campaigns are all about doing things as cheaply as possible. If they think they can get away with using a space that isn’t ADA accessible, they will.
  4. Because this work is important. For a campaign to truly be successful, even outside of winning or losing the election, the campaign needs to be representative of the community, and the only way we can make sure the disability community is represented is by showing up.
  5. And finally, because we have things to fight for. There are still a number of different ways that our society is and is allowed to be ableist and society will continue to be ableist as long as we let them. Getting involved with campaigns, to elect leaders who care about our issues, or with issue campaigns surrounding our issues is a way we can fight to make our society more equitable, both for our community and other disenfranchised communities.
For full Article: Elevate Blog: Rajah Sandor on Being a Disabled Campaign Staffer

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Advocates Concerned Trump Administration Rule Making Puts Community Living Programs at Risk & More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 17, 2020

Good Morning my Wonderful Family in Community,
I hope you are all doing well today. First, I wanted to take a moment to wish my friend and PCA (Sarah) a heartfelt Happy Birthday! She is probably going to kill me for mentioning this….I think it’s important to honor those who support our community to do the things we do every day. Happy Birthday Sarah thanks for being there for me so early in the morning and sometimes late into the night. Wishing all of my valued leaders a wonderful day!

Breaking News: Advocacy to Protect Home and Community Based Services Needs to Happen NOW. Make your voice heard!
Sharing from Justice In Aging

When Congress passed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, it included critical protections for people who rely on Medicaid during the pandemic. Congress provided additional Medicaid funding and said that states accepting the increased funding could not cut health care coverage, services, or increase costs. In November, the Trump Administration rolled back these protections.
The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued an Interim Final Rule (IFR) that allows states to keep the extra Medicaid funding but strips away protections for people. For example, under the IFR, states can: 
  • Cut full Medicaid coverage for older adults turning 65 years old. These older adults will face increased costs and lose coverage for critical services such as transportation, dental, vision, and hearing that Medicare does not cover. 
  • Eliminate or cut home and community-based services (HCBS) for older adults and individuals with disabilities, which may cause health crises or force them to be institutionalized. 
  • Cut coverage for eligible people after hospitals or other health care providers have helped them sign up for Medicaid. 
  • Cut all kinds of health care services, like dental and vision, resulting in individuals going without needed care or taking on unexpected medical costs. 
The Interim Final Rule also paves the way for mass Medicaid terminations as soon as the public health emergency ends. 
These health care cuts will disproportionately harm people of color, immigrants, older adults, and people with disabilities, and worsen existing health disparities.  
Comment today! The deadline to submit a comment on the IFR is January 4, 2021. 
Resources
·         The National Health Law Program has created the My Care Counts comment portal for individuals to tell HHS not to cut Medicaid and reject this bad policy. Be sure to customize and tell your story!  
·         Organizations are encouraged to submit comments as well. Email us if you would like an organizational template letter to work from. 
A Tidbit from ME: Rolling back policies that promote home and community-based services would be truly devastating for our communities. People with disabilities and older adults depend on these vital services to remain independent and thrive in their communities. It is important that you make your voice heard now. If you need assistance or want to learn more about the importance of home and community based services to our communities please reach out to Marin CIL.

County of Marin Update
First Doses of COVID-19 Vaccine Arrive in Marin as ICU capacity dwindles
Marin County hospitals and skilled nursing facilities received the first of the county’s allocation of 1,950 doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine today, December 16. This comes on the same day Governor Gavin Newsom followed through on a December 3 warning and issued a Stay-Home Order for 11 Bay Area counties, including Marin, based on limited intensive care unit (ICU) capacity as cases surge across the region.
“This couldn’t come soon enough,” said Dr. Matt Willis, Marin County Public Health Officer. “Vaccinating our front-line health care workers will protect them as they manage surges in cases.”
The vaccine doses are the first of weekly deliveries. The first doses will be divided among three local hospitals and 13 skilled nursing facilities. It will take several months to implement widespread vaccinations in the community.
At the same time, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) is implementing its Regional Stay-Home Order for 11 counties in the Bay Area after the region’s collective ICU capacity dipped below the 15% threshold, reaching 12.9%. The order goes into effect at 11:59 p.m. Thursday, December 17, and will remain in place for a minimum of three weeks, contingent on CDPH projections of whether the region’s ICU capacity will return to and stay above the 15% threshold.
In Marin, hospitals are switching from normal to surge plan operations because of increased COVID-19 cases and stretched staffing in ICU units. ICU units in Marin hospitals reached full, pre-surge capacity on December 15. ICU capacity, as reported, reflects the normally staffed and immediately available beds.
“There is still room for people needing critical care, but this is the start of true hospital surge for Marin,” Willis said. “It’s critical that we see the link between our everyday behavior and our health care system — the transmission happening in the community is driving hospitalizations. With this surge, the state is moving toward even tighter restrictions for community and businesses to follow to help stabilize the curve.”
Marin has 29 ICU beds that can be staffed under normal operations, according to Marin County Public Health. The next step is considered surge operations, at which hospitals implement or consider:
  • physicians assessing all ICU patients to determine whether/when it is appropriate and safe to promote patients out of the ICU;
  • nursing staffs being asked on a voluntary basis to work extra shifts beyond their usual assignments; and
  • additional nurses being pulled in from rapid response teams and break/relief nurse lists.
The Stay-Home Order that goes into effect Thursday night replaces Marin’s voluntary adoption of the order, extending beyond the original January 4 end date. In addition, some industries will be held to tighter standards under the state’s interpretation of the order. Businesses and residents are encouraged to review the state’s Regional Stay-Home Order webpage for clarification on which activities are permitted under the order.
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control’s key steps to fight the pandemic includes protection of high-risk groups and health care workers, identifying and isolating cases, and tracing and quarantining people who have been in contact with confirmed COVID-19 patients. Everyone should be wearing face coverings, avoiding gatherings, postponing travel, and staying home whenever possible.
 
You’re Invited: Stay-Home Order -themed Community Conversation Event
Please join us for another virtual Community Conversation event, this Friday, December 18 at 2:00pm. Similar to the event we held last week, Dr. Matt Willis and Max Korten will be providing a brief update on ICU capacity, our status under the Stay Home Order, and what all of this means for our community.  Live Q&A will take place and the event will be held in English with live Spanish interpretation accessible through the Zoom platform.  Details and
How to participate:
Online:  Zoom.us/join
Phone:  (669) 900-6833
Zoom Meeting ID: 956 2661 1169, Attendee ID: #, Password: 074775
Or watch on Facebook: facebook.com/CountyOfMarin
 
 Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin gets first virus vaccinations as infections break record
By MATTHEW PERA | mpera@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: December 16, 2020 at 6:26 p.m. | UPDATED: December 17, 2020 at 7:31 a.m.
Hospital workers at the Kaiser Permanente San Rafael Medical Center on Wednesday were the first in Marin to get vaccinated against the coronavirus, marking a historic moment in the pandemic.
“It’s what we’ve all been waiting for,” said Charles Hill, a 69-year-old janitor at the hospital, who rolled up his sleeve and went first.
A shipment containing 1,950 doses of Pfizer’s vaccine arrived at Marin County’s emergency operations center on Wednesday morning. Health officials distributed the doses to local hospitals and skilled nursing centers, where they will initially be offered to staff members.
“This couldn’t come soon enough,” said Dr. Matt Willis, Marin County’s public health officer. “Vaccinating our front-line health care workers will protect them as they manage surges in cases.”
For Full Article: Marin gets first virus vaccinations as infections break record
A Tidbit from Me:
Please join the State Council on Developmental Disabilities in an important opportunity to directly share feedback and concerns regarding the COVID-19 Vaccine. SCDD’s Executive Director, Aaron Carruthers, is a member of the newly established Community Vaccine Advisory Committee (CVAC). Aaron will be hosting community input sessions to share information, explore your concerns and establish plans for ongoing communication regarding Vaccine Committee activities. 
The sessions will be offered via Zoom over several days in diverse time slots to support broad stakeholder and community participation. Please note there is a unique registration link for each time slot. The schedule follows:
Thursday, December 17th – 11:30 AM-1:00 PM
Register in advance for this meeting: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEtdeCurzMuH9bNtIlBGSpcZOuDK2DQCfif 
Thursday, December 17th – 6:00-7:30 PM
Register in advance for this meeting: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYud-quqzMiGdJJVwMd6CDV66zWFRDBNzvA 
Friday, December 18th – 3:30-5:00 PM
Register in advance for this meeting: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJElduihpjwiHdXKP1X-vWiIx98FL_CTlqzc

Sharing from SCDD
SUPERFEST SACRAMENTO
A disability film festival.
Celebrate cutting-edge cinema that portrays disability through a diverse, complex and engaging lens. The festival is one of a few worldwide, completely accessible to film-goers of all kinds. This virtual event will take place on Wednesday, January 27 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Zoom. 
  • Short films selected by disability rights advocates and filmographers
  • Featuring animated and dramatic shorts, plus full-length features
  • Hosted by the library for the first time in January 2020

REGISTER(OPENS IN A NEW WINDOW) 
Superfest 2021 Films

Alternative Ways of Being Human 
Used assistive devices take on second lives in this documentary about a passionate sculptor in Finland. 
 
Stand Up 
For all her life, 30-year old Jazmine who uses a wheelchair has wanted to be an actress. Meeting Ruth, while navigating the tough world of stand-up comedy, she learns that accessibility isn’t just about physical space.
 
Sign at All Times 
A young skateboarder shares his journey to find pride in his Deaf identity. 
 
Single 
Kim, who was born with one arm, gets set up on a blind date. When she finally meets Jake, she quickly realizes he also has a physical disability, and she is pissed.
 
Garden Variety 
A mockumentary about a disabled person’s garden and his unwarranted admirers
 
Chin Up 
Throughout her childhood, JoAnne loved to draw herself as heroic characters to escape the insecurity and feeling of being different that came with her condition. However, JoAnne never drew her facial features any differently to fit the scene of a heroic warrior or mystical mermaid. This animated documentary touches on poignant milestones that have impacted JoAnne and made her the strong woman that she is today. 
 
Gaslit 
A young disabled woman fights to hold on to her identity in the face of the world’s assumptions, and strives for independence from her parents, who doubt her ability to become a mother. 
 
Chief 
This reverent ode to the service dog tells the story of German immigrant Sonja Ohldag, who is diagnosed with a seizure disorder after moving to the U.S. in 1999. Unable to afford a service animal from an organization, Sonja trains her dog herself and takes a chance on Chief, who is not your average service dog. 
 
Gaelynn Lea 
Minnesota violinist and disability rights advocate Gaelynn Lea travels the upper Midwest on tour, experiencing the ups and downs of the road while hustling hard to make it as a performer and artist. 
 
Join us for Superfest Sacramento in 2021. Sign up for our newsletter to be one of the firsts to receive details.   
 
NEWSLETTER SIGN UP(OPENS IN A NEW WINDOW)

Source: Sacramento Superfest


Sharing from my friend and one of California’s most powerful Disability Rights Activists: Sheela Gunn-Cushman
Be My Eyes App
Be My Eyes is a free mobile app with one main goal: to make the world more accessible for blind and low-vision people. The app connects blind and low-vision individuals with sighted volunteers and companies from all over the world through a live video call.

Since we launched in January 2015, more than 4,000,000 volunteers have signed up to assist blind and low-vision users. Be My Eyes users can request assistance in over 180 languages making the app the biggest online community for blind and low-vision people as well as one of the largest micro-volunteering platforms in the world! Every day, volunteers sign onto Be My Eyes to lend their sight to blind and low-vision individuals to tackle challenges and solve problems together.
For More Information: Be My Eyes

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

DRC Protecting our Brothers and Sisters, LTSS, PG&E Townhall, ICU Reaching Capacity, and More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 16, 2020

Good Morning my family in community,

I hope you are all doing well this morning. There is quite a bit packed into today’s PM Morning Report so let’s get right to it. Have a great day. Waving “hello” to you this morning.

Breaking News
Disability Rights California and Covington & Burling, LLP Seek Emergency Court Action to Release Medically Vulnerable Patients from Crowded State Mental Health Hospital and Save Lives in the Midst of Surging COVID-19 Outbreak
110 patients with mental health disabilities test positive in ten days; 10 dead since start of pandemic
Dec 15, 2020
(Los Angeles, CA) Yesterday, Disability Rights California (DRC) and Covington & Burling filed an emergency motion in federal court to force the Department of State Hospitals (DSH) to discharge medically vulnerable patients from Patton State Hospital, one of the largest psychiatric hospitals in the country that is in the midst of a massive and deadly COVID-19 outbreak.
Hundreds of patients who are involuntarily confined at Patton State Hospital have conditions that put them at high risk for severe illness or death from COVID-19.
In the last 10 days, more than 110 patients have tested positive for COVID-19. One patient, Sgt. Ricardo Tapia, a decorated Marine veteran with a traumatic brain injury, recently described the hospital as a “ticking time bomb.” He tested positive for COVID-19 this week.
The outbreak has been deadly.  Since COVID-19 entered Patton’s patient population, 10 patients have died, at least 11 more have required acute hospitalization. One Patton patient, James Moore, has been fighting to get moved to a safer setting, stating, “[w]ith all of my medical conditions, I do not know if I will survive the pandemic.” Mr. Moore also tested positive for the virus last week and was hospitalized with difficulty breathing, coughing up blood, and running a persistent fever.
The outbreak at Patton was predictable and avoidable. In March 2020, the State authorized the Director of California Department of State Hospitals, to take whatever steps were necessary to protect the patients in her custody and care with Executive Order N-35-20.1 To this day, Director Clendenin has not issued a single directive to get patients out of Patton.
For full article: Disability Rights California and Covington & Burling, LLP Seek Emergency Court Action to Release Medically Vulnerable Patients from Crowded State Mental Health Hospital and Save Lives in the Midst of Surging COVID-19 Outbreak


Sharing from our friends at PG & E
Pacific Gas and Electric Company’s (PG&E) primary responsibility is the safety of the customers and communities we are proud to serve. On Wednesday, December 16, we are inviting our customers to join us for an interactive safety town hall. During this town hall, customers will hear about our work to prevent wildfires, get answers to their questions and have an opportunity to share feedback with our team.
 
We encourage you to share this invitation with anyone who would be interested in learning more about:

  • PG&E’s wildfire prevention activities
  • Overview of 2020 Public Safety Power Shutoffs
  • Steps your community can consider for staying safe this winter
 
PG&E Safety Virtual Town Hall
6 – 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, December 16
Click this link to join: https://bit.ly/2JWoDP3
Toll-Free Attendee Dial-in: (844) 738-1853
Conference ID: 9968387
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL as part of our Disability Disaster Access and Resources Program is here for you. If you are a person with a disability or an older adult and want to learn about how to create a disaster plan, sign up for PG&E Medical Baseline, or depend on power for life safety and independence and would be impacted by a utility public safety power shutoff or other emergency please reach out to us. To learn more go to marincil.org/psps


Sharing from Disability Rights California
This is your last chance to make difference by speaking out for accessible housing. You made a difference at TCAC’s last meeting. Let’s make it count as TCAC makes their final vote on whether to adopt the proposed to increase required accessible units. The meeting will be Monday, December 21 starting at 11:15am. The full set of proposed regulations will be Agenda Item 5. Please see details below about how to comment at the meeting and how to make reasonable accommodation requests.
 Call in on Monday, December 21, 2020 at 11:15am to thank TCAC for listening to the community and making a change, to share your stories with TCAC and to ask them to vote to increase accessible affordable housing. You can join by Zoom or phone. If you try Zoom but get a message that the meeting is full, please call in by phone.
a.    Zoom: Go to https://zoom.us/join, Meeting ID: 871 6682 3814 and Passcode: 199276
b.    Phone: Call (888) 557-8511 and enter Participant Code: 5651115
c.    We have attached a list of talking points as a guide. The most important thing is that you share how accessible affordable housing is important to you or people you know. We have also attached DRC’s detailed comment letter. Thanks to everyone who signed on!
d.    If you need reasonable accommodations for the meeting, please try to submit the request by Wednesday, December 16 to meet TCAC’s 5-day requirement. If you cannot make this deadline, you should still submit your reasonable accommodation request. Call (916) 654-6340 and ask for Sertan Usanmaz or send an email to sertan.usanmaz@treasurer.ca.govjudith.blackwell@treasurer.ca.gov, and anthony.zeto@treasurer.ca.gov
e.    For additional information see the links to the meeting agenda and final proposals below
                                                    i.     Agenda: https://www.treasurer.ca.gov/ctcac/meeting/2020/20201221/agenda.pdf
                                                  ii.     Final Proposals with Responses to Comments: See page 56-57, Section 10325(f)(7)(K) athttps://www.treasurer.ca.gov/ctcac/programreg/2020/20201029/final-proposed-changes.pdf.
 
Thank you for your support. Please contact Dara Schur and Natasha Reyes at Disability Rights California with any questions (Dara.Schur@disabilityrightsca.org and Natasha.Reyes@disabilityrightsca.org).


Sharing from the SILC
I am excited to provide you with a video that members of the Grassroots committee (and other grassroots allies) created in support of universal LTSS in the Master Plan. It features the voices of over a dozen Californians speaking about why LTSS is important to them, including members of CFILC, SEIU 2015, CARA, Hand in Hand and the Ca Domestic Workers Coalition.
California faces a shortage of 600K-3 million homecare workers needed to meet our state’s needs by 2030. That is why the CA Master Plan for Aging must prioritize universal Long-term Services and Supports (LTSS) so that we can all live and age with dignity. 
Link to the Video: https://fb.watch/2oHWlObKIH/
Descriptive Transcript: https://bit.ly/LTSSTranscript
A Tidbit from Me: Expanding the access and availability of Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS) is so important to people with disabilities and older adults. This has been an initiative of Marin CIL since our inception. Many people with disabilities, like myself, would not be able to do anything we do including living independently, working, and living full and independent lives without personal care assistance and other long-term services and supports. To learn more or get involved in the advocacy and policy activities to expand the accessibility and availability of long term services and supports please reach out to us.


Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin hits maximum ICU capacity as coronavirus rages
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: December 15, 2020 at 5:35 p.m. | UPDATED: December 16, 2020 at 6:49 a.m.
The first coronavirus vaccinations in Marin will take place on Thursday, but a surge of new cases still threatens to overwhelm hospital intensive care units, the county’s public health officer said.
“We know that community transmission is accelerating exponentially,” Dr. Matt Willis told the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday. “Our hospitals are at or near full capacity, and case rates in Marin are four times higher than one month ago.”
The county reported Tuesday that all the fully staffed intensive care unit beds at Marin’s hospitals are now in use. Twelve of the 29 beds are occupied by coronavirus patients.
Two more deaths have been linked to the virus in Marin, bringing the death toll to 108, the county reported. The county also reported another 78 infections Tuesday, bringing the total number of cases to 6,374 since March.
For full article: Marin hits maximum ICU capacity as coronavirus rages
A Tidbit from Me: I know I have talked about the importance of practicing good habits to stop the spread of Covid-19. Remember to please, please, please wear a mask, practice social distancing, and follow State and Local guidance relating to Covid-19. We all have a collective responsibility to one another to help each other stay safe and healthy. I know we are all very excited that vaccinations have begun and there is a light at the end of a long road. WE must continue to do our part for community.

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Marin CIL's own Kathleen to be Honored Today, Covid19 Update, Spread the Word about YLF, and More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 15, 2020

Good Morning my Family in Community,
I hope you are doing well on this very cool morning. I am at my computer very early this morning. There is a lot on my calendar. I am contemplating whether I should have a second cup of coffee. I think the answer is yes! Lot’s to do…so here you go. Have a great day. Be good to yourselves and each other.

Breaking News
24 professionals named for North Bay Nonprofit Leadership Awards in 2020 including Marin CIL’s own Kathleen Woodcock. Kathleen serves as our Director of Community Resources and Fund Development and is an indispensable member of our team. 2020 has been a transformative time for Marin CIL. We are extremely proud of Kathleen and our entire organization for the great work they do supporting the independence of people with disabilities and older adults in Marin County. Marin CIL would also like to extend a heart-felt congratulations to our friends and partners Omar Carrera CEO of Canal Alliance and Paul Fordham, Deputy Executive Director for Homeward Bound who are also receiving this prestigious award. Congratulations Kathleen and all the winners. Thanks for all the work you do in support of our communities every day.
Source: 24 professionals named for North Bay Nonprofit Leadership Awards in 2020

County of Marin Update
COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Headed to Marin County
Late last week, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine, and California’s COVID-19 Scientific Safety Review Workgroup confirmed the vaccine to be safe and efficacious. Clinical trials show the vaccine is 90% effective at preventing the SARS-CoV-2 virus which causes COVID-19.
[VIEW MESSAGE FROM DR. WILLIS ON YOUTUBE]
This is an exciting moment and a new chapter in Marin County’s COVID-19 response. Later this week, the initial doses of this new vaccine will arrive in Marin County and we’ll begin the process of vaccinating those at highest risk of contracting COVID-19, including our frontline health care workers at hospitals and skilled nursing facilities. Vaccine production is in its infant stages and supplies are currently limited. While the vaccine is scarce, Marin Public Health will prioritize distribution based on the likelihood of exposure to the virus at work, or to vulnerability to serious illness if infected. It may be a few months before the vaccine is available to the general population.
Vaccine is essential to bring COVID-19 under control, but the virus is raging now. We must focus on what we can do today to save lives. It is critical for people to protect themselves and their families by wearing face coverings in public, not mixing with other households, washing hands regularly and maintaining physical distancing. Even after we have safe, effective vaccine to offer the public, all these measures will be important for ending the pandemic.
 
New Webpage for COVID-19 Vaccine Information
Marin Public Health has launched a new COVID-19 Vaccine webpage at Coronavirus.MarinHHS.org/vaccine. There, you can find ongoing updates about the COVID-19 vaccination effort in Marin, answers to frequently asked questions, and a library of resources for providers and the general public.
 
A great opportunity for students with disabilities (Please share far and wide)
The 2021 YLF application deadline has been extended to January 29, 2021.

The California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD) has extended the application deadline for the 2021 Virtual Youth Leadership Forum for Students with Disabilities (YLF). Please provide this information to any organizations and contacts you have that work with youth to help us get a diverse and qualified group of applicants.

YLF is a six-day summer self-advocacy and leadership development program for students with disabilities, including post-YLF workshops after the weeklong event (workshop dates and times to be determined). The 2021 YLF is scheduled for July 11 – 16 virtually using the Zoom platform. All reasonable accommodation expenses are sponsored through a public-private partnership.

Young people with disabilities have more opportunities and more challenges than at any other time in our nation’s history. With the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), they have unprecedented opportunities to fully develop as constructive, contributing members of our society. However, many need encouragement and information about resources to develop as leaders in their communities. The forum enables them to learn from each other and from successful adults with disabilities who are recognized leaders and role models. Such a forum benefits not only the participants, but all young people with disabilities, communities in general, and the adults who assist in producing the forum.

Please note that an earlier version of this email stated that there was a possibility of the event being hosted partially in person. Since that announcement was sent, the YLF planning partners have decided that the 2021 event will be hosted fully online.

Students must complete an application, write an essay and provide letters of recommendations. Students will also be interviewed by a YLF partner team in their local communities. This is a competitive process and not all students will be selected. Applicants must be sophomores, juniors or seniors during the 2020-21 school year ending by June 30 to be eligible to apply.

YLF applications must be completed electronically and emailed to ylf@dor.ca.gov. The deadline to apply is January 29, 2021.

The 2021 application and related documents, including an outreach flyer, can be found at https://www.dor.ca.gov/Home/YLF

For other questions, please call the CCEPD office at 855-894-3436 or email us at YLF@dor.ca.gov.
A Tidbit from Me: If you need more information or need assistance navigating the application process please reach out to Marin CIL.

Sharing from our friends and partners at the Department of Developmental Services
The Department of Developmental Services (DDS) wants to hear from you about your experiences working with your regional center and service providers during COVID-19.  Please take a few minutes to answer the survey below. DDS will share the combined information on its website.  Individual responses will not be shared.
DDS: Self-Advocate and Family Survey

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin’s coronavirus surge: 2 more deaths, 1 ICU bed remains
By MATTHEW PERA | mpera@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: December 14, 2020 at 7:25 p.m. | UPDATED: December 15, 2020 at 7:20 a.m.
Marin’s coronavirus infections continued to snowball over the weekend, as health officials reported two more people died of COVID-19 and just one intensive care bed remained in the county’s hospitals.
The fatalities, both reported on Sunday, brought Marin’s death toll to 106 since the beginning of the pandemic, according to county data.
By Monday, Marin’s remaining ICU bed availability had dipped to 3% after three more COVID-19 patients were transferred to intensive care on Sunday.
County data showed that 28 ICU beds were filled out of the 29 for which staff are available in Marin’s hospitals. Eleven of those beds were occupied by coronavirus patients.
For full article: Marin’s coronavirus surge: 2 more deaths, 1 ICU bed remains

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

Statewide Vaccine Taskforce, My Friend Russell in the News, Health Care Disparities Re: Covid & More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 14, 2020

Good Morning my Family in Community,
I hope you are all doing well today. Lot’s happening in our world and I’ve been on the go. Raising my Mocha in your honor today. My calendar just beeped…..time for a meeting. Have a wonderful day. Sending you a smile!


Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin City critics blast county over fast-tracked housing
By LORENZO MOROTTI | lmorotti@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: December 13, 2020 at 11:19 a.m. | UPDATED: December 14, 2020 at 6:57 a.m.
Marin City residents and community leaders say they are unhappy with the county’s fast-track approval of a five-story, 74-apartment complex on Drake Avenue.
At an online meeting on Thursday with county planning representatives, Marin City leaders said the county should have denied the plan. They argued that the community, one of the more racially diverse in Marin, already has the highest density of multi-family zoning in the county.
Critics also said the project will add traffic congestion to a fire-prone area with limited emergency egress, critics said.
Marin Community Services District board member Terrie Green said there are predominantly White communities in Marin that lack affordable housing.
For Full Article: Marin City critics blast county over fast-tracked housing
A Tidbit from Me: As a young person my second apartment was in Marin City. The people who live in the community are vibrant. This valued community has been often times overlooked when it comes to receiving safetynet services and opportunities to achieve economic independence that have been offered to other communities in Marin. The concern expressed in this article once again raises issues relating to racial equality and equity.


Sharing from the ARC of California
Disability Thrive Initiative Launch
Dear Family/Self Advocate,
You are invited to participate in a FREE Webinar on Wednesday, December 16, 2020 from 3:00 to 4:15 p.m. introducing California’s Disability Thrive Initiative. The Initiative was launched in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the shift in how your regional center services are currently being delivered to you and/or your family member to keep you as safe as possible.
Throughout 2021, the Disability Thrive Initiative will deliver free webinars, support, and a resource library to help the IDD community with the alternative services offered during the public health crisis.
To join the LIVE online event, please REGISTER EARLY at DisabilityThriveInitiative.org/Webinar. Interpreters will be available for ASL and Spanish..
We strongly encourage you to take part in the webinars, and to stay connected to the Disability Thrive Initiative through their social media channels, so you can stay informed of the latest information about COVID-19 and its impact to your services.
Source: Disability Thrive Initiative Launch

COVID-19 Department of Developmental Services and CA Department of Public Health Update

Last Friday the Developmental Services Taskforce met to provide an update for stakeholders throughout the state. The Department shared their concern that there is an alarming increase in the number of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the state that are testing positive for COVID-19, an increase in hospital admissions, and an increase in deaths. The Department is tracking the number of new cases, and hospital admission so they can work with individuals, families, and providers to continue to identify trends and develop strategies to slow the spread of COVID, provide care for people who have tested positive, and plan accordingly for surge capacity. Complicating the issue is the increase number of direct support professionals and family members that are testing positive. Accurate data is essential to developing interventions, so the Department is requesting that if someone in the household – clients, family members, direct support person – tests positive they contact their service coordinator to let them know.
Dr. Ron Chapman, California Department of Public Health, spoke to the DS Task Force about the COVID-19 Vaccine and the work that is being done at the state level to address issues of priority and distribution. The California Department of Health and Human Services Agency, CA Department of Public Health, had created a Community Vaccine Advisory Committee to address issues specific to equitable vaccine implementation and decision-making. The disability community is well represented on the Advisory Committee as the State Council on Developmental Disabilities, Disability Rights CA, Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund, are among the members of the Advisory Committee.  The Advisory Committee will meet 6 more times between now and February 17, 2021. If you are interested in learning more about the work of the Advisory Committee visit: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/Community-Vaccine-Advisory-Committee.aspx.
The first round of doses of the vaccine are expected to arrive in CA early this week and be prioritized for frontline workers in hospitals and health care. The CDPH is projecting that there will be approximately 2 million doses in California by the end of December.  The CDPH has published recommended guidelines based on a phased approach to vaccine distribution which can be found here: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/CDPH-Allocation-Guidelines-for-COVID-19-Vaccine-During-Phase-1A-Recommendations.aspx.
Source: COVID-19 Department of Developmental Services and CA Department of Public Health Update
A Tidbit from Me: Christina Mills, Executive Director of the California Foundation of Independent Living Centers is a member of the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee.

Mark your calendars: SCDD will be hosting upcoming community meetings:
SCDD  will be hosting community input sessions to share information, explore your concerns and establish plans for ongoing communication regarding Vaccine Committee activities. 
Wednesday, December 16th – 8:30-10:00 AM
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJErf-6opj8rHdVUdpiTtMCY04VmLDQRiMPC 
 
Thursday, December 17th – 11:30 AM-1:00 PM
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEtdeCurzMuH9bNtIlBGSpcZOuDK2DQCfif 
 
Thursday, December 17th – 6:00-7:30 PM
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYud-quqzMiGdJJVwMd6CDV66zWFRDBNzvA 
 
Friday, December 18th – 3:30-5:00 PM
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJElduihpjwiHdXKP1X-vWiIx98FL_CTlqzc
 
If you would like to request reasonable accommodations, contact Charlotte Endres of SCDD by emailing Charlotte.Endres@scdd.ca.gov.
 If you cannot join one of these sessions but want to contribute comments or concerns please fill out our survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VZ5J5JK.
 This is a time sensitive, special opportunity to hear from other stakeholders and learn about committee information. SCDD’s intention is to share regionally informed, specific concerns within our community directly with the Governor’s CVAC.

Sharing from CBS 13
‘It’s Ridiculous’: Man In Wheelchair Says It Took Days And An Ambulance To Get To Testing Site After COVID-19 Exposure
By Marlee Ginter December 13, 2020 at 11:31 pm
SACRAMENTO (CBS13) – A nightmare mission to get a COVID-19 test took one man on a wild ride to a testing site.
After being exposed to COVID-19 when one of his caregivers tested positive, Russell Rawlings told CBS13 he never imagined it would be so difficult to get tested.
“It’s scary honestly, and I didn’t expect it to be,” said Rawlings.
Rawlings, who has cerebral palsy, is an active voice for those with disabilities. He said it took him several days and an ambulance to get to a COVID-19 testing site.
“They’d never had people even ask about these things. They hadn’t thought about it because I guess no one has ever raised the flag with them,” said Rawlings.
“Then we couldn’t even get a caregiver to come in in the evenings because we were all exposed and no one wanted to come in and work, obviously,” said Rawlings’ roommate and live-in caregiver Aleathea Simmons.
To make matters worse, Rawlings said by the time he arrived in the ambulance, he was 10 minutes past his appointment time and everyone had left for lunch.
“So here I was strapped to a gurney in a parking lot for a little over an hour,” said Rawlings.
Source: ‘It’s Ridiculous’: Man In Wheelchair Says It Took Days And An Ambulance To Get To Testing Site After COVID-19 Exposure
Tidbit from Me: Russell is a good friend of mine who is also the Statewide Community Organizer for the California Foundation for Independent Living Centers. He supports the Systems Change Hub which is part of the Disability Organizing Network (DOnet). The Disability Organizing Network consists of community members with disabilities and staff from Independent Living Centers (including Marin CIL). Russell’s story brings up health care disparities people with disabilities and older adults experience in their every day life. These disparities have been amplified because of the Covid-19 pandemic.


Sharing from CDCAN
IMPORTANT STAKEHOLDER PUBLIC MEETINGS TODAY AND LATER THIS WEEK COVERING:

  • EARLY LEARNING, EARLY INTERVENTION, AND PRESCHOOL;
  • DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES (WORKGROUP AND ANOTHER FULL TASK FORCE MEETING);
  • COVID-19 & VACCINES: COMMUNITY ADVISORY VACCINE COMMITTEE; OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES/OFFICE OF ACCESS & FUNCTIONAL NEEDS (AFN) COVID-19 AND VACCINE UPDATES;
  • KEY STATE HOUSING COMMITTEE MEETING TO VOTE ON PROPOSED REGS THAT INCLUDES PROPOSAL TO INCREASE ACCESSIBLE HOUSING UNITS IN NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS
SACRAMENTO, CA [BY MARTY OMOTO, CDCAN LAST UPDATED  12/14/2020 06:35 AM] - Several important stakeholder meetings - open to the public - are scheduled today (December 14th) and later this week that should interest people with disabilities (including developmental), people with mental health needs, people who are blind, people who are deaf, older Californians (seniors), their families, people (and their families)who provide supports and services to all those communities, and others:
  • TODAY (DEC 14TH) AT 12:00 - 2:00 PM - Department of Developmental Services (DDS) Oversight, Accountability and Transparency Workgroup of the Developmental Services (DS) Task Force meetings - using Zoom and also a call-in line. (see below).
  • TODAY (DEC14TH) AT 4:30 - 6:00 PM - California Department of Education (CDE) Opportunities for All Branch hosting a Zoom (and also call-in) stakeholder public meeting on "Addressing Equity through Preschool, Early Intervention, and P-3 (Preschool through 3rd Grade) Alignment in California"
  • Later this week includes the weekly California Department of Public Health's  (CDPH)Community Vaccine Advisory Committee meeting; Developmental Services Task Force meeting; Office of Emergency Services (OES) Office of Access and Functional Needs COVID-19 and Vaccine update Zoom meeting and call, and a online meeting of a key state housing committee (California Tax Credit Allocation Committee) who will consider (and likely approve) revised proposed regulations that includes a proposal to increase the number of required accessible units required for new housing construction projects (see below).   
CDCAN NOTE: To receive the free CDCAN Reports, send email request to Marty Omoto (with "CDCAN Reports Subscribe" in the subject line) to: martyomoto@att.net
WHEN: DECEMBER 14, 2020 - MONDAY    ***TODAY***
TIME: 12:00 - 2:00 PM (Pacific Time)
AGENCY: DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES (DDS)
WHAT:  OVERSIGHT, ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY WORKGROUP OF THE DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES TASK FORCE (25 Members)
SUBJECT: 
IN-PERSON MEETING LOCATION?: No
ZOOM LINK - REGISTER FOR MEETING: 
https://cal-dds.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_FDR5fQu9SpKnZfeLL5I3kw
    Note: You will be sent to registration page titled "Webinar Registration" and will need to type in your first and last name and email address.
    After completing the registration, you will receive email response from "DS Task Force" with the subject line of "Oversight, Accountability and Transparency Workgroup Meeting Confirmation" that will contain the link to the actual Zoom webinar that is specific to your registration only for this meeting only.
PHONE ACCESS: To access the December 14, 2020, Oversight, Accountability and Transparency Workgroup of the Developmental Services Task Force Zoom Meeting by phone only (no registration needed): 
    PHONE NUMBER: 1 669 900 6833 
    PHONE WEBINAR ID: 967 6351 2288   [December 14th]
WHEN: DECEMBER 14, 2020 - MONDAY   ***TODAY***
TIME: 4:30 - 6:00 PM (Pacific Time)
WHO: CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION - OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL BRANCH
WHAT: STAKEHOLDER MEETING ON  "Addressing Equity through Preschool, Early Intervention, and P-3 [Preschool - 3rd Grade] Alignment in California" 
HOW TO PARTICIPATE IN THE MEETING: 
  Two ways to participate - by Zoom or by phone. 
   ACCESS USING ZOOM:
     STEP 1: REGISTER (REQUIRED) FOR ZOOM: 
     https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_STqXu1HVTaaU-JNXKSD3Mw
     STEP 2: REGISTRATION: Once you click on the registration link you should be taken to a Zoom webpage titled "Webinar Registration - Topic: Addressing Equity through Preschool, Early Intervention, and P-3 Alignment in California - Description: Statewide meeting to discuss early learning and early intervention services - Time Dec 14, 2020 04:30 PM in Pacific Time (US and Canada)". You will need to fill out your name (first and last), email address and also any organization you might be connected to (this is not required) and then press "Register"
     STEP 3: REGISTRATION CONFIRMATION WITH MEETING LINK: Within a few minutes or less, you should receive an email from the "CA Department of Education" with the subject title "Addressing Equity through Preschool, Early Intervention, and P-3 Alignment in California Confirmation". That email - addressed to you - will contain the actual link to join the meeting. This link to Zoom is SPECIFIC to your registration and should not be shared.
   ACCESS BY PHONE: To access the December 14, 2020, California Department of Education Opportunities for All Branch Zoom Meeting by phone only (no registration needed): 
    PHONE NUMBER: 1 929 436 2866
    PHONE WEBINAR ID:  829 0655 5075
    PASSCODE: 192484

WHEN: DECEMBER 17, 2020 - THURSDAY
TIME: 4:00 - 5:00 PM (Pacific Time)
WHO: GOVERNOR'S OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES - OFFICE OF ACCESS AND FUNCTIONAL NEEDS
WHAT: COVID-19 UPDATE - VACCINE UPDATE (open to public stakeholders)
TWO WAYS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE MEETING:
    USING ZOOM (NO advance registration needed): Participants will be able to ask questions and provide comments using chat feature (raise hands or type in comment or question) or by the call-in line below).
    ZOOM MEETING LINK:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83418362671
                                      OR
   CALL-IN LINE:1-669-900-9128 ("Welcome to Zoom")
   CALL-IN PASSCODE: 83418362671#

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Happy Friday! Marin Updates, Accessible Transportation During Covid-19, Webinars, and much more


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 11, 2020

Good Morning my Family in Community,

Happy Friday! Yesterday the PM Morning Report took a pause because yours truly was having some disability and technology issues. It comes under the category of “stuff happens”. All is good. Have a great weekend. Here is the PM Morning Report for you.

County of Marin Update
“Answering The Call” Crucial to Contact Tracing Success
A crucial tool in slowing the spread of COVID-19 in any community is contact tracing. Contact tracing is when public health workers identify and notify the people who were exposed to infected people. They let them know that they’ve been in close contact with an infected person, and what to do next to keep themselves and their loved ones safe. Public health departments have used contact tracing for decades to fight the spread of infectious diseases.
 
How does it work?
Public health workers contact those who have tested positive by phone. People who have tested positive may be asked about people they were with who they may have exposed while they were contagious. Public health workers then call those close contacts to let them know that they may have been exposed. When they do this, they keep the name of the person who tested positive confidential.
Contact tracers will:

  • Notify you that you may have been exposed to COVID-19
  • Check symptoms and how you’re feeling
  • Offer testing
  • Discuss next steps like testingquarantineself-isolation, and medical care
By helping infected and exposed people self-isolate or quarantine and finding patterns quickly, we can slow the spread of the infection and help avoid outbreaks. This helps keep Marin residents, their loved ones, and our community safe from infection and serious illness. This also helps us keep our healthcare system below capacity. Contact tracing is a necessary activity that allows us to safely reopen schools and businesses.
 
Contact tracing works when you answer the call.
All you have to do is answer the phone call from Marin Public Health.  Contact tracing is an anonymous way to do your part. The more people answer the call, the more lives and jobs we can save. Your information is always kept confidential. Early awareness helps you protect your friends and loved ones from exposure. And early medical care can improve your outcome if you do get sick.
The sooner we can reach you, the sooner you can get advice, testing, and the support you need. 
Read more about California’s contact tracing efforts, or listen to Dr. Willis explain how isolation, quarantine and contact tracing work hand-in-hand (originally recorded in May 2020).
WATCH ON YOUTUBE
 
 

Sharing from the California Department on Aging
Ensuring Equity In Aging Webinars in 2021
Over the next several months, CDA will host an Ensuring Equity in Aging webinar every first Wednesday, from 10-11am. Presentations will cover a range of topics including the value of cultural traditions and harnessing community strengths and assets, as well as how historic and systemic discrimination and internal biases harm the wellbeing of Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC), LGBTQ, disabled older adults, and in different ways, all Californians. Speakers will address how we can work together to address the resulting inequities through culturally responsive policy, program, and service planning and delivery.
January 6th, 2021: Our first webinar of 2021 will focus on Culturally Informed Policy and Programs: The Culture of LGBTQ Older Adults. Join Jennifer Pardini of Legal Assistance for Seniors and Karyn Skultety of Openhouse for a discussion on how we can build community, provide services, and create opportunities with and for LGBTQ older adults. Time will be reserved for Q&A. Closed Captioning will be available. Register for this webinar here.

A Tidbit from Me: These are important topics as Marin’s older adult community is rapidly growing.  The population of Marin is aging rapidly. Today, 27% of Marin residents are over 60 years old. This number is expected to increase to 34% by 2030. It is important to be on the cutting edge of addressing the services and supports to ensure that people age in place and thrive in their communities. Marin CIL has been a partner in advancing various aging in place initiatives in our communities on the local, State, and National level. To get involved or learn more about these initiatives please reach out to us.

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Mill Valley equity task force seeks permanent commission, citywide racial equity plan
By LORENZO MOROTTI | lmorotti@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: December 10, 2020 at 6:27 p.m. | UPDATED: December 10, 2020 at 6:46 p.m.
Mill Valley’s equity task force is recommending it be turned into a permanent commission that could help in the creation of a citywide racial equity plan.
The Diversity, Equity and Inclusion task force presented months of work to the City Council on Monday. It included a list of 30 recommendations, including its top proposals to make the task force permanent and create a citywide equity plan, said task force Chairwoman Naima Dean.
“The challenge of entrenched racism will not be overcome without dedicated, sustained and strategic leadership,” Dean said. “A permanent DEI commission, inclusive of our BIPOC community and local partners, is integral in providing practical assistance in implementing focused and innovative initiatives.”
The report includes six areas of focus to improve equity for people of color in, and near, Mill Valley. These areas were government strategies, law enforcement, affordable housing, cultural and recreational engagement, economics and education through community partnerships.
To see the recommendations by the Commission: Mill Valley equity task force seeks permanent commission, citywide racial equity plan

 
 Sharing from Science Direct
Impacts of COVID-19 on access to transportation for people with disabilities
Abigail L.Cochran1
Abstract
People with disabilities may be particularly vulnerable to the direct health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the wider impacts of the pandemic response. People with disabilities experience numerous barriers to using transportation to access essential goods, like fresh food, and services, like medical care, that are necessary for maintaining health. The pandemic and the pandemic response threaten to exacerbate persistent health disparities and add to transportation barriers that disadvantage people with disabilities. To better understand difficulties that individuals with disabilities are facing using transportation and meeting their needs during the pandemic, I conducted in-depth interviews with 21 San Francisco Bay Area residents with disabilities between March 20 and April 6, 2020, immediately following adoption of the first shelter-in-place orders in the region. Analyzing these interviews, I find that the pandemic is aggravating many difficulties accessing transportation and other essentials that people with disabilities regularly encounter. These include challenges accessing reliable and safe transportation as well as up-to-date communications about transportation and public health, and difficulties getting needed assistance using transportation and completing activities of daily living ranging from personal care to getting groceries. I recommend that those involved in the pandemic response make a concerted and intentional effort to address barriers to accessing needed transportation, communications, and assistance that people with disabilities are facing during the pandemic, paving the way for a more inclusive pandemic response.
For full report: Impacts of COVID-19 on access to transportation for people with disabilities
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL serves on the Golden Gate Transit Accessibility Advisory Committee and the Paratransit Coordinating Council. As part of our role has been working with Golden Gate Transit, Marin Transit, and Marin Access to ensure that while they adapt policies and service in response to Covid-19 the needs of people with disabilities and older adults are considered to ensure the continued mobility of our communities.

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

Sen. Mike McGuire & Assemblyman Marc Levine Speaking at Marin Commission on Aging Thurs, EVV, & more


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 9, 2020

Good Morning my Absolutely Wonderful Family in Community,
I hope you are doing well today. There is a lot packed into today’s PM Morning Report for you.
I wanted to draw your attention to tómmorrows Marin Commission on Aging Townhall. The speakers will be Senator Mike McGuire and Assemblyman Marc Levine. Marin CIL participates on the Legislative Committee of the Marin Commission on Aging which played a key role in planning tomorrow discussion. See below for more information:

Sending you a smile as I have a second cup of coffee in your honor.  

Sharing from the Marin Commission on Aging
You’re Invited to a Town Hall Meeting with Senator Mike McGuire and Assemblyman Marc Levine.
Thursday, December 10, 2020
10 - 11 a.m.
This event will focus on relevant issues for older adults in Marin County, including information and coordination during natural disasters, the COVID-19 pandemic, affordable housing, housing the homeless, and California’s Master Plan for Aging.

Senator Mike McGuire
Senator Mike McGuire represents the 2nd Senate District which includes Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Sonoma and Trinity Counties. He was elected to the state senate in 2016 and has led efforts to invest in roads, bridges, and highways, is an advocate for strong public schools, and the environment.

Assemblyman Marc Levine
Assemblyman Marc Levine represents the 10th State Assembly District- Marin and Southern Sonoma Counties. He is focused on representing the local interests of Marin and Sonoma, protecting our environment, and supporting our schoolsand universities.

Moderated by:
Lee Pullen, Director, Area Agency on Aging, County of Marin

11:15 a.m. Commission on Aging Business Meeting
Members of the public are encouraged to attend!

MARIN COUNTY COMMISSION ON AGING


Join Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/8526641821?pwd=S3ZlQzdDQ0R0aC9INWo3Y0NwM01nQT09
Meeting ID: 852 664 1821
Passcode: 94903
Dial in number 1+ (669) 900-6833


County of Marin Update
VIDEO:  COVID-19 Update to the Board of Supervisors
Today, Dr. Matt Willis updated the Marin County Board of Supervisors about the current COVID-19 response.  His update provided greater detail about surges in cases locally and nationwide, rationale for adopting the state’s Regional Stay Home Order, an overview of new local and state restrictions, new details on COVID-19 vaccine efforts in Marin County, and more.
WATCH ON YOUTUBE
 
 
The Regional Stay Home Order: What is allowed to operate?
As of today, December 8 at 12pm, the State of California’s Regional Stay Home Order is in effect for Marin County. Under the Stay Home order, all gatherings with members of other households are prohibited, except as expressly permitted in the State’s Regional Stay Home order.  The intent of the order is to reduce gatherings and activity in our communities to stop the spread of COVID-19.  The Regional Stay Home Order asks all individuals to stay home or at their place of residence as much as possible, except to complete only the most essential tasks, like go to the doctor, buy groceries, take your child to school, go on a hike, or worship outdoors.
The Regional Stay Home Order affects business operations in several industries.  Here is an overview of businesses that must close, modify operations or can continue under the order.  For further clarification, please visit the State of California’s Regional Stay Home Order webpage.
Arts & Entertainment

  • Allowed to operate, with restrictions: Industries, studios, and other related establishments such as establishments that provide content for professional broadcast can operate without live audiences.
  • Must close, both indoor and outdoor operations: Museums, movie theaters, family entertainment centers, cardrooms.
Construction:
  • Allowed to operate, with restrictions: All construction sites and construction business office operations.
Faith Services & Cultural Ceremonies:
  • Places of worship, cultural ceremonies and political expression is allowed in outdoor environments only.
General Office Space:
  • All office space should allow for remote-only operations except for critical infrastructure sectors where remote working is not possible.
Gyms & Fitness Studios:
  • Allowed to operate, with restrictions: Outdoor gyms, fitness studios, and related classes (e.g., dance, yoga, etc).
  • Must close: All indoor gym and fitness studio operations
Hotels, Motels & Hospitality
  • Short term lodging facilities are allowed to operate for COVID-19 mitigation and containment measures, treatment measures, provide accommodation for essential workers, or providing housing solutions, including measures to protect homeless populations.
  • Hotels and lodging cannot accept or honor out-of-state reservations for non-essential travel, unless the reservation is for at least the minimum time period required for quarantine and the persons identified in the reservation will quarantine in the hotel or lodging entity until after that time period has expired. 
Outdoor Recreation
  • Allowed to operate, with restrictions: Outdoor recreational facilities and sites may operate for the purpose of facilitating physically distanced personal health and wellness through outdoor exercise, without any food, drink or alcohol sales. Outdoor recreation facilities include parks, skate parks, sports courts (e.g., basketball, tennis), and related facilities.
  • Must close: Overnight stays at campgrounds will not be permitted; Both indoor and outdoor playgrounds must close.
Personal Care & Hair Services
  • Allowed to operate, with restrictions: Medically prescribed massage (e.g., with referral from physician or physical therapist)
  • Must close, both indoor and outdoor operations: Hair Salons, Barbershops, Nail Salons, Tattoo parlors, piercing shops, tanning salons and related businesses.
Restaurants, Wineries, Bars
  • Allowed to operate, with restrictions: Restaurants: Take-out and Delivery only
  • Must close, both indoor and outdoor operations: Wineries, bars, breweries and distilleries (does not serve food) must close.
Retail & Malls
  • Allow indoor operation at 20% capacity with entrance metering and no eating or drinking in the stores. Additionally, special hours should be instituted for seniors and others with chronic conditions or compromised immune systems.  Food courts and common areas should close.
Libraries:
  • Libraries follow retail guidelines: indoor operations may continue at 20% capacity with entrance metering and no eating or drinking in the branch locations.
School Services
  • Allowed to remain open and provide on-site classroom-based instruction to students.
Childcare & Youth Programs
  • Childcare programs are permitted continue.
  • Youth programs are permitted to continue
  • Youth sports are restricted to outdoor activities only limited to individual conditioning and training activities where physical distancing and mask wearing can be enforced.
 
Still have questions? Review our Frequently Asked Questions page developed from top questions received by our call center.
Additional Resource Documents  
 
California Blueprint Update: Marin Moves to Tier One
Today, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) confirmed Marin County’s placement back in Tier 1 (purple status) on the Blueprint for a Safer Economy framework.  CDPH’s December 8, 2020 assessment for Marin County includes:
CDPH’s update was based on data from November 22 to November 28. Marin’s adjusted case rate has increased by 3.7 and the test positivity rate increased 0.4 since CDPH’s analysis on Tuesday, December 1. Review Marin’s data in greater detail on Marin HHS’s State Metrics for Marin County webpage.
What does a change in Tier mean when the Stay Home order is in effect?
The Regional Stay-Home Order is more restrictive and supersedes the Blueprint for a Safer Economy, therefore, Tier 1 business guidelines do not apply. However, Marin’s move to purple status now requires any schools that have not yet reopened to in-person classroom learning to apply for a waiver in order to reopen. Schools that already reopened to site-based learning – either by approved waiver or having opened when Marin County was in Blueprint Tiers 2 or 3 – may remain open and are unaffected by Marin’s new Tier 1 status or the Regional Stay Home Order.
If the Stay Home Order in effect, does the Blueprint Status matter?
Yes. The Stay Home Order is temporary will be in effect for Marin County through January 4, 2020 (or longer if available ICU capacity for the Bay Area should fall below 15%).  Once the Stay Home Order ends, businesses will resume operations in accordance with Marin’s current placement in the Blueprint framework.
 
 
Join us tomorrow: “The Stay-Home Order: Q&A For Businesses”
We understand the Stay-Home Order arrived quickly for everyone, especially our businesses. We invite our local businesses to join us for a virtual town hall meeting especially so we can help tackle your questions about the Regional Stay-Home order.  Questions will be taken during the event.
Panelists:
Dr. Matt Willis – Public Health Officer
Max Korten – Coordinator for Marin Recovers Industry Advisors
Wednesday, December 9, 2:00pm to 3:00pm
How to participate:
Online: Zoom.us
Call-in: 1 (669) 900-6833
Webinar ID: 956 2661 1169
Attendee ID: #
Passcode: 074775
 
 


Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Virus vaccine to reach Marin next week as cases mount
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: December 8, 2020 at 5:56 p.m. | UPDATED: December 9, 2020 at 7:07 a.m.
As a surge in new coronavirus cases continues to accelerate, the first vaccine doses in Marin County are expected to be administered next week.
“We’ve seen a dramatic increase in cases,” Dr. Matt Willis, the Marin County public health officer, told supervisors Tuesday.
By Tuesday afternoon, 90 more Marin residents had tested positive for the virus since Monday afternoon. That compared with 38 new cases the day before.
Willis said Tuesday that 25 of the county’s 29 staffed intensive care unit beds were occupied. He said the jump in cases might be attributable to Thanksgiving-related transmission.
A stay-at-home order announced on Friday by Marin and four other Bay Area counties took effect on Tuesday and will remain in place until Jan. 4. The order directs residents to remain at home for the most part and avoid contact with people outside of their households. Indoor operations by businesses are severely limited if not prohibited.
For full Article: Virus vaccine to reach Marin next week as cases mount

San Rafael seeks applicants for open City Council seat
By MATTHEW PERA | mpera@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: December 8, 2020 at 5:15 p.m. | UPDATED: December 9, 2020 at 7:08 a.m.
San Rafael officials are seeking applicants to fill a vacant seat on the City Council left by Kate Colin, who was sworn in on Monday as the city’s new mayor.
Colin was elected in November 2017 to a five-year term that is set to end in December 2022. Council members are typically elected for four years, but the city temporarily implemented five-year terms in order to align its elections with national ones.
Last month, Colin was elected the first woman mayor in San Rafael’s history. After a swearing-in ceremony on Monday, she assumed the role that Gary Phillips has held for the past nine years. That left the council with three members in addition to the mayor, rather than the typical four.
For full article: San Rafael seeks applicants for open City Council seat

Sharing from CDCAN
DEC 9TH (WED) 3:00 - 6:00 PM: COMMUNITY VACCINE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING #3
SACRAMENTO, CA [BY MARTY OMOTO, CDCAN LAST UPDATED  12/08/2020 06:55 PM] - The 3rd public meeting of the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee under the California Health and Human Services (CHHS) agency and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) is scheduled for December 9th, Wednesday afternoon, from 3:00 to 6:00 PM (Pacific Time). Additional meetings - all open to the public - are scheduled through February (see below for details).
      Wednesday, Dec 16, 2020
      Monday, Dec 21, 2020
      Wednesday, Jan 6, 2021
      Saturday, Jan 20, 2021
      Wednesday, Feb 3, 2021
      Wednesday, Feb 17, 2021

    The public can participate in the advisory committee meetings in a "listen only" mode using the call-in numbers for both English and Spanish (a new number was posted that is different from the one used for the November 30th meeting - see below). In addition for this meeting, a livestream youtube link will be available (see below). 
    The public can provide written comments directly to the committee - and also to the California Health and Human Services (CHHS) agency and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) by sending comments to: 
    COVID19vaccineoutreach@cdph.ca.gov
    California's COVID-19 vaccination plan is being implemented in several phases. In the beginning, vaccine supplies will be limited and it likely will be well into 2021 before vaccine is widely available.
    The Community Vaccine Advisory Committee is co-chaired by California Surgeon General Dr. Nadine Burke Harris and Erica Pan, MD, MPH, Acting State Health Officer, California Department of Public Health. [CDCAN Note: as previously reported December 7th by CDCAN, the Governor announced Monday (December 7th) the appointment of Tomás Aragón, 61, of San Francisco, as the new Director of the California Department of Public Health. Aragón has been Health Officer for the City and County of San Francisco and Director of the Population Health Division for the San Francisco Department of Public Health since 2011.]
    According to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee online (Zoom) meetings will be conducted virtually and open to the public in a listen-only mode.  All meetings will be noticed on the CDPH website in advance and summaries of the committee’s meetings will also be posted. 
    CDCAN NOTE: To receive the free CDCAN Reports, send email request to Marty Omoto (with "CDCAN Reports Subscribe" in the subject line) to: martyomoto@att.net
WHEN: DECEMBER 09, 2020 - WEDNESDAY
TIME: 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM (Pacific Time)
WHO: CALIFORNIA  HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CHSS) AGENCY AND THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH (CDPH)
WHAT: COMMUNITY VACCINE ADVISORY COMMITTEE - MEETING #3
NEW MEETING INFORMATION:
    CALL-IN NUMBER - ENGLISH (LISTEN ONLY):
      English Toll free: 844-721-7237
      English Access Code:  2243784

    CALL-IN NUMBER - SPANISH (EN ESPANOL) (LISTEN ONLY)
      Spanish Toll-Free:844-721-7237
      Spanish Access Code: 8752493

    LIVESTREAM - VIA YOUTUBE (as of 12/8/2020 7:15 PM this link was not yet working): 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkNEUkIwtlc_kPenEZMUlO

Sharing from Stop EVV
Contact Congress to Request a Delay in EVV Penalties to States!

Right now Congress is discussing a bill to continue funding programs and services across the nation. This is our opportunity to get them to delay the penalties to states if their EVV solutions are not yet implemented. Do not wait - this bill could be pushed through as early as this week!

Your voice matters!

How You Can Help:

1. Contact your Representative and Senators. You can call on the phone, send an email, or use Twitter. Find their contact information at the following links:

House Representativehttps://www.house.gov/representatives/find-your-representative
Senators: https://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm
Twitter handles: http://www.tweetcongress.org/


2. Use the below scripts and feel free to add your own comments: 

Phone Script
"My name is _____. I am calling to urge the Representative to support the proposed disability community's draft omnibus conference committee report language. Please support the Continuing Resolution language that will delay the cuts to Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) for states that have not fully implemented electronic visit verification (EVV). Medicaid HCBS provide critical independent living services that support people with disabilities and seniors living in the community. We cannot cut HCBS during COVID!"


Email Template
I am writing today to urge the representative to support the proposed disability community's draft omnibus conference committee report language targeting the FMAP penalty provisions under the 21st Century Cures Act. 

The federal Cures Act prescribes the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) impose financial penalties should states not have electronic visit verification (EVV) implemented by January 1, 2021. Implementation of the statutory mandate has been so problematic that several states are prepared to sustain the Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) penalty in lieu of executing EVV programs. Many Medicaid disability providers are experiencing reduced staff capacity as demand for services increase. Huge numbers of day programs and employment support services have temporarily closed. The coronavirus has exacerbated an existing workforce crisis in the disability field with average turnover rates among direct support professionals exceeding 50% per year before the pandemic. Self-directed personal care services consumer employers are facing an unprecedented worker shortage and it's not uncommon for them to default into a nursing home as a result.

HCBS provide critical independent living services that support disabled people and seniors in their home. We must protect these programs. Please do everything in your power to support and ensure a prohibition on the Secretary from appropriating any funds to implement the Medicaid FMAP reductions for personal care and home care services authorized under Sec. 12006(a)(1)(A) and (B) of the 21st Century Cures Act until the expiration of the public health emergency.


Twitter Post - add your Representative and Senators' handles
Prohibit #EVV cuts to #Medicaid HCBS. #HCBS provide critical independent living services that support #disabled people and seniors in their home. We cannot cut HCBS funding to states during #COVID! #StopEVV #CripTheVote


3. Contact members on the Appropriations Committee! If you're still energized and able, contact each member of the Appropriation Committee with the same messages (above). A list of each member is attached.

WHO WE ARE
Stop EVV is an American grassroots campaign led by disabled people and independent personal care providers. We believe the federal law that requires Electronic Visit Verification (EVV) violates civil rights and erodes independent living options.

Stop EVV is a proud member of the National Council on Independent Living (NCIL) EVV Task Force and Steering Committee! Our staff serve on the Task Force and Steering Committee as both members and Co-Chair.

OUR MISSION
Stop EVV fights for the guarantee to the Fourth Amendment Right to Privacy under the United States Constitution for disabled people and their individual providers forced to use Electronic Visit Verification (EVV). We advocate to maintain independent living rights to choice, control, flexibility, freedom and equality. Stop EVV uses grassroots mobilization efforts to highlight issues within the home care industry with regard to EVV impact, ensure disabled Americans maintain their ability to remain in the community, and demand civil rights to privacy are protected by law.


A Tidbit from Me: The Stop EVV coalition is a subcommittee of National Council on Independent Living, Marin CIL’s national membership organization. NCIL has been raising concern after receiving feedback from a cross-section of disability advocates and their allies relating to the components of EVV that are considered in conflict with the principles of autonomy, self-determination, and Independent Living philosophy. Of particular concern is the use of GPS, geofencing, and biometrics (fingerprints, facial recognition). As an alternative the subcommittee does support the use of web-based time sheets, where both the consumer and individual provider can input and edit shifts on a weekly basis.
As I reported previously: In the initial discussions with California and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) which is a Federal program. California’s proposed EVV plan was to track whether services were provided in a community setting or at home without requiring the use of GPS to verify where the service is occurring. Most recently CMS informed California that GPS or some other geo-tracking system would be required in order to be in compliance with the EVV program. It is my understanding the discussions are still occurring between California and CMS. GPS or geo-tracking won’t be necessary if a service is being performed away from someone’s home in the community however GPS or geo-tracking will be required when services are provided at someone’s home. For example if an In-home support services provider starts a shift at someone’s home and uses a cellphone the GPS must be activated to verify the services are provided in someone’s home. This has raised tremendous concern for many of us in the disability community as well as providers and unions that represent home care providers. Some stakeholders and providers do support EVV as a way to maintain program integrity.

Sharing from CalABLE
Selecting Investment Options for Your CalABLE Account
Date: Thursday, December 10, 2020
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM (PT)
CalABLE Account holders learn about the different Investment and Savings Options.
  • What is the FDIC–Insured savings option
  • What are target risk Investments
  • How to maximize your account contributions before December 31, 2020
Guest Speaker: Glenn Friedman, CFA, Manager of Asset Allocation, TIAA-CREF Tuition Financing, Inc.
This webinar is for the seasoned account holder and will not include the basics of the CalABLE Program. 
If you would like to join us via computer and submit questions during the webinar, please Register to receive a confirmation email and login information.
There is an audio only option available as well. Please note that in using the audio only option, you will not be able to submit questions during the broadcast. To join via telephone:
  • Call +1 (669) 900-6833
  • Enter Webinar ID: 950 7706 3237
For those who are unable to make the live broadcast, a replay of the webinar will be made available on CalABLE's YouTube channel.
If you have not had a chance to attend a presentation on the fundamentals of the CalABLE program, we recommend that you listen to the replay of our CalABLE 101 webinar available on YouTube at  https://youtu.be/kmZvXudyV1w. This replay can help answer some of the questions you may already have and provides a good foundation. 
What is Cal ABLE?
CalABLE is a savings and investment plan offered by the state of California to individuals with disabilities.
Eligible individuals, family, friends and employers can contribute up to $15,000 a year without affecting the account beneficiary's public disability benefits. CalABLE account owners who work can contribute even more to their accounts. Best of all, earnings on qualified withdrawals from a CalABLE account are federal and California state tax-free.

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

 

Marin Covid19 Update, Governor Appoints Three People to Key Positions, Webinars, & Vaccine Committee


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 8, 2020

Good Morning my Family in Community,

I hope you are all doing well this morning. I am working really hard to get my motor running…..and I’m not talking about my powerchair. It is definitely a multiple coffee day. Here is my PM Morning Report for you. Wishing you the most fabulous day.


County of Marin Update:
Marin County COVID-19 Status Update: December 7, 2020
The Marin County COVID-19 Status Update is published weekdays and as needed to share important news and resources related to the COVID-19 pandemic and to keep the local economy running. We remain here for you.
 
 
New Stay-Home Order Starts Tomorrow: What’s Open?
The Stay-Home order goes into effect in Marin County tomorrow (Tuesday) at 12-noon.  We understand the State’s Regional Stay-Home Order is has left some room for interpretation and have been doing what we can to navigate questions received by our call center (415-473-7191) and our COVID-19 response team (contact them here).
The state has created a helpful FAQ on their Regional Stay-Home Order information webpage and we have updated the “Guidelines for Businesses” section of MarinRecovers.com to help guide industries about necessary business changes. As we continue to receive clarification from the state regarding those “gray area” questions, we’ll continue to update those resources at MarinRecovers.com.
In addition, two webinars will be held this week to help provide further clarification.  Find details for those two events below.
 
Schools & Public Health Community Meeting
The Marin Office of Education will host a virtual community meeting with Marin Public Health to provide an updated on COVID-19 in Marin County and the current situation at Marin County schools.  All Marin County school and parent/guardian communities are invited to participate. English & Spanish available. More information available online. 
Panelists:
Dr. Matt Willis – Public Health Officer
Dr. Lisa Santora – Deputy Public Health Officer
 
Tuesday, December 8, 11:00am to 12:00pm
How to participate:
Online: Zoom.us
Call-in: 1 (669) 900-6833
Webinar ID: 838-1396-3089#
Passcode: 083245
 
 
Community Conversation Event – “The Stay-Home Order: Q&A For Businesses”
We understand the Stay-Home Order arrived quickly for everyone, especially our businesses.  Join us for a virtual town hall meeting especially for businesses as we tackle your questions about the new Stay-Home order.  Questions will be taken during the event.
Panelists:
Dr. Matt Willis – Public Health Officer
Max Korten – Coordinator for Marin Recovers Industry Advisors
 
Wednesday, December 9, 2:00pm to 3:00pm
How to participate:
Online: Zoom.us
Call-in: 1 (669) 900-6833
Webinar ID: 956 2661 1169
Attendee ID: #
Passcode: 074775

 District Attorney, Fairfax PD Address False Social Media Post about Swastika Case
San Rafael, CA -- A recent social media post falsely attributed information from the Marin County District Attorney's Office and Fairfax Police Department about an incident involving a man posting Nazi swastika stickers around downtown Fairfax in late November.
District Attorney Lori Frugoli said a post on Facebook falsely indicated that the incident was staged. She said no such information exists, nor has any such information been relayed to her office or Fairfax Police.
On November 24, a resident videotaped another individual placing the swastika stickers and contacted Fairfax Police. Officers contacted the individual, documented the incident, and forwarded a report to the District Attorney’s Office. The case is under investigation and any information regarding the status of the case will be issued by the respective offices.
“We take incidents of hateful conduct and hate crimes seriously as we know how harmful this conduct is to our community,” Frugoli said. “Intentional and unintentional posting of false information about the case compounds the harm to our community and those who have the courage to step forward and report incidents and crimes of hate. Please take a moment to check sources before sharing or posting information that could be harmful to our community.”
The DA’s Office and Fairfax Police encourage and support the reporting of crimes of hate and hateful incidents to local law enforcement agencies. Messages may be left on the Marin County District Attorney's Hate Crime Hot Line at 415-473-2585.
You have subscribed to News Releases & Advisories for Marin County. This information has recently been updated.
Visit the Newsroom to view all County news releases.


Sharing from CDCAN:

Governor Appoints Tomas Aragon As New Director of the California Department of Public Health - Appoints Elizabeth Landsberg as Director of the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development - Appoints Mary Watanabe As Director of Department of Managed Health Care
    Governor Gavin Newsom announced today (December 7th) three key health related appointments including tapping Tomas Aragon, the Health Officer for the City and County of San Francisco, to fill the position of director of the California Department of Public Health - the critical state agency in charge of leading California's response to the COVID-19 pandemic. 
    Sandra Shewry, MPH, MSW, vice president of External Engagement for the California Health Care Foundation (CHCF), was named on August 21, 2020, as acting director of the California Department of Public Health. Shewry, who served from 2004-2007 as director of the California Department of Health Care Services, was brought on as acting director to fill the vacancy caused by the abrupt resignation of Dr. Sonia Angell late Sunday evening, August 9th. Her resignation came less than a week after state officials reported a tech glitch that resulted in an undercount of coronavirus cases and confusion about the scope of infections as the state’s death toll crossed 10,000. Angell was named to the post by Newsom in October 2019 and served less than a year. Despite the circumstances surrounding her departure, Newsom praised her leadership especially in the area of health equity. 
    State law requires that the director of the California Department of Public Health also serves as state health officer and must be a physician. In August the Governor named Erica Pan, MD, MPH, as acting state health officer, while Shewry served as acting director of the department. Presumably Aragon will fill both posts, though the announcement did not specifically indicate that. 
    The Governor announced the following appointments: 

  • TOMAS ARAGON - CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH: Tomás Aragón, 61, of San Francisco, has been appointed Director of the California Department of Public Health. Aragón has been Health Officer for the City and County of San Francisco and Director of the Population Health Division for the San Francisco Department of Public Health since 2011. He has been Volunteer Faculty for the University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health since 2004. He earned a Doctor of Medicine degree from Harvard Medical School, a Doctor of Public Health Degree from the University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health and a Master of Public Health degree from the Harvard School of Public Health. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $275,650. Aragón is a Democrat.
  • ELIZABETH LANDSBERG - OFFICE OF STATEWIDE HEALTH PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT: Elizabeth Landsberg, 51, of Sacramento, has been appointed Director of the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development. Landsberg has been Deputy Director of the Help Center for the California Department of Managed Health Care since 2016. She was Director of Policy Advocacy for the Western Center on Law and Poverty from 2006 to 2016, Supervising Attorney for the Health Rights Hotline at Legal Services of Northern California from 2000 to 2006 and a Law Clerk at the U.S. District Court, District of New Mexico from 1999 to 2000. She was a Ruth Chance Law Fellow for Equal Rights Advocates from 1998 to 1999. Landsberg earned a Juris Doctor degree from the University of California, Berkeley School of Law. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $192,402. Landsberg is a Democrat.
  • MARY WATANABE - CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF MANAGED HEALTH CARE: Mary Watanabe, 48, of Roseville, has been appointed Director of the California Department of Managed Health Care, where she has served as Acting Director since 2020 and as Acting Chief Deputy Director since 2019. She was Deputy Director for Health Policy and Stakeholder Relations for the California Department of Managed Health Care from 2015 to 2019 and Deputy Director of the Sales Division for Covered California from 2013 to 2015. Watanabe was Staff Services Manager I at the California Managed Risk Medical Insurance Board from 2012 to 2013, where she was a Research/Health Program Specialist I from 2008 to 2012. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $186,389. Watanabe is registered without party preference.

Community Vaccine Advisory Committee Set to Hold 3rd Meeting on Wednesday (December 9th)
    Of special significance, given the enormous increases in COVID-19 and hospitalizations in California and across the nation - resulting in new stay-at-home orders linked to ICU capacity - is the series of public online meetings of the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee under the California Health and Human Services (CHHS) agency and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), with additional meetings set for December 9th, 16th and 21st (see below for details). 
    California's COVID-19 vaccination plan is being implemented in several phases. In the beginning, vaccine supplies will be limited and it likely will be well into 2021 before vaccine is widely available.
    The Community Vaccine Advisory Committee is co-chaired by California Surgeon General Dr. Nadine Burke Harris and Erica Pan, MD, MPH, Acting State Health Officer, California Department of Public Health.
    According to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee online (Zoom) meetings will be conducted virtually and open to the public in a listen-only mode.  All meetings will be noticed on the CDPH website in advance and summaries of the committee’s meetings will also be posted. 
  Public comments and other vaccine related inquiries can be sent to this California Department of Public Health Community Vaccine Advisory Committee email: COVID19vaccineoutreach@cdph.ca.gov

Sharing from SCDD

Join the State Council on Developmental Disabilities –
Sacramento Regional Office for our December Zoom Chat with DREDF

Tuesday, December 8, 2020 - 10:00 am - 11:00 am
DREDF (Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund: https://dredf.org/) has been selected as the Parent Training & Information Center for 30 Northern CA Counties and is funded by the US Department of Education to serve families of children and young adults from birth to age 26 with all disabilities: physical, cognitive, emotional, and learning. DREDF now provides services in El Dorado, Nevada, Placer, Sierra, and Sacramento counties. In collaboration with Matrix Parent Network and Resource Center they will offer services in Alpine, Sutter, Yuba, and Yolo counties. They also collaborate with Rowell and Family Soup agencies.
 
They help families and professionals:
  • Obtain appropriate education and services for their children with disabilities;
  • Work to improve education results for all children;
  • Train and inform parents and professionals on a variety of topics;
  • Resolve problems between families and schools or other agencies;
  • Connect children with disabilities to community resources that address their needs.
 
Juliet Barraza, Kenya Martinez, Cheryl Thies, and Diana Vega will share about the services and supports offered through DREDF and how to collaborate as they expand their reach to serve this region in the coming months.

Bring your questions and join us for this important discussion!
 
Please click on this Zoom link to Pre-register. https://bit.ly/3lKygy4
You will then receive an email with your personalized link to the Zoom Training.
.               
 
If you have a question or need an accommodation, please contact Sonya Bingaman at least 5 days in advance of the training at sonya.bingaman@scdd.ca.gov or 916-715-7057. Spanish language simultaneous translation will be provided on Zoom.
 
Recordings of trainings will be posted at www.youtube.com/CalSCDD.
Recordings are in English, with optional Closed Captioning and language translation available.
 
Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin virus outlook darkens ahead of new restrictions
By MATTHEW PERA | mpera@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: December 7, 2020 at 12:15 p.m. | UPDATED: December 8, 2020 at 6:41 a.m.
With a new stay-at-home order set to take effect on Tuesday, Marin’s coronavirus surge intensified as the week began.
On Monday, 21 people were hospitalized with the virus, which was the highest number in Marin’s hospitals in more than three months. According to county data, the number of people currently hospitalized with the virus has risen by almost 91% over the past week and nearly 163% over the past two weeks.
“We’re also seeing dramatic increases in cases,” said Dr. Matt Willis, the county’s public health officer, noting that there is typically a delay between an uptick in infections and a corresponding rise in hospitalizations. “The fact that over the past few days we’ve seen the highest number of cases since July is a concern that we’ll see more patients come into our hospitals.” Six coronavirus patients were in intensive care on Monday, taking up about a fifth of Marin’s 29 total ICU beds for which medical staff are available. An additional 16 patients were in intensive care for reasons other than the coronavirus, bringing the county’s remaining ICU capacity to about 24%, according to health officials.
On Friday, Willis announced that Marin would join other Bay Area counties in adopting Gov. Gavin Newsom’s new stay-at-home order, which is only a requirement for regions in California where ICU capacity dips below 15%. Capacity in the Bay Area region was hovering around 26% on Monday, Newsom said.
For Full Article: Marin virus outlook darkens ahead of new restrictions

Marin businesses brace for new anti-virus lockdown
By LORENZO MOROTTI | lmorotti@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: December 7, 2020 at 5:55 p.m. | UPDATED: December 8, 2020 at 6:51 a.m.

Marin’s small business community — which has worked with cities for months to operate under pandemic health orders — is facing more uncertainty as another stay-home order takes effect Tuesday.
Piazza D’Angelo in Mill Valley is one of many Marin businesses that built an outdoor dining space that it won’t be able to use this holiday season.
“It’s going to affect us a lot, especially in December,” said Alberto Aparicio, the restaurant’s general manager. “We were doing so well these last three months with outdoor seating. It was working great, and all of a sudden everything is shut down with Christmas right around the corner.”
As part of the county’s latest health order to ease the strain on the health care system, restaurants are among the industries curbed by the coronavirus surge. While retail is allowed to continue at 20% capacity, restaurants must limit operations to take-out or delivery only.
As part of the county’s latest health order to ease the strain on the health care system, restaurants are among the industries curbed by the coronavirus surge. While retail is allowed to continue at 20% capacity, restaurants must limit operations to take-out or delivery only.
For full report: Marin businesses brace for new anti-virus lockdown

Sharing from the ARC of California

Last week The Arc of California submitted comments to the newly established Community Vaccine Advisory Committee within the California Department of Public Health. Our comments stressed the heroic work of direct support professionals and family caregivers during the pandemic protecting the health of people with disabilities – who are more likely to develop serious illness if infected with COVID-19. We urged the committee to prioritize the IDD community when the state determines guidelines for access and distribution of vaccines. Our submitted comments can be viewed here
Additionally, the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) has developed this FAQ on COVID-19 vaccine distribution considerations fo the disability community.
To learn more about the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee and California’s vaccination plan go to https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/OPA/Pages/NR20-311.aspx


Covered California Open Enrollment
Covered California is a free service that connects Californians with health insurance, information on subsidies for health insurance, or qualifying for Medi-Cal. Open enrollment for 2021 occurs between November 1, 2020 and goes through January 31, 2021. Open enrollment is the period of time that people can purchase health care for the upcoming year without having to have a qualifying life event. This year Covered California has added loss of a job or income due to COVID-19 or Wildfires as life events that qualify for Special Enrollment which means that individuals can apply anytime, not just during open enrollment.
Individuals can apply completely on-line or on the telephone and service center hours are extended through December 15, 2020. Enrollment services – online and telephone -are offered in multiple languages. To learn more about getting health care coverage, or if you qualify for financial assistance visit https://www.coveredca.com/get-started/ or call 1-800-300-1506.

Sharing from the National Low-Income Housing Coalition

In response to the current economic and public health crisis, federal, state, and local governments have responded with numerous policy solutions to keep renters stably housed. 
Join Community Solutions and the National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC) to learn more about how to prevent evictions and their negative impacts on communities during the pandemic.
We invited a panel of experts to educate, inform, and energize communities around:
  • the framework for an equitable response to COVID-19
  • the impact of evictions on communities
  • the effectiveness of current eviction moratoriums
  • the landscape of emergency rental assistance programs and their implementation.
This webinar is free to attend, but registration is required. Please RSVP by December 15, 2020.
REGISTER TODAY
Panelists include:
  • Moderator: Amber Elliott, Community Based Improvement Advisor – Catalytic Projects, Community Solutions
  • Emily Benfer, Professor, Wake Forest Law School, Founding Director of the Wake Forest Law Health Justice Clinic 
  • Rebecca Yae, NLIHC Senior Research Analyst 
  • Vincent Reina, Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania 
  • Expert from the National Innovation Service
  • Housing Policy Expert, City of Los Angeles, Office of Mayor Eric Garcetti

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

 

Marin Covid-19 Update, Marin Using Hotels to Shelter Homeless, Eli's Thoughts Regarding LTSS, & more


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 7, 2020

Good Morning my Fabulous Family in Community,

I hope you all had a wonderful weekend. A lot happening in the world of advocacy this week. So let’s get to it! Here is my PM Report for you. Sending a virtual smile to each of you!

County of Marin Update
Virtual Grand Rounds: National COVID-19 Surge
The nation is already experiencing an unprecedented and widespread surge of COVID-19, which may get further compounded by holiday travel, social gatherings and the risk of co-infection with winter respiratory viruses. 
On Tuesday, December 8 at 12:00pm, the California Health and Human Services Agency (CHHS) and Medical Association (CMA) are hosting a conversation with physicians that hold central roles in our national COVID-19 response:

  • Eric Goosby, M.D., Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Goosby has had significant experience in previous responses to infectious diseases, including serving as a senior advisor to President Barack Obama on HIV-related issues. He will also share how the coronavirus response may evolve into 2021.
  • Seema Jain, M.D., Chief, Disease Investigations Section for the Infectious Diseases Branch, California Department of Public Health (CDPH). Jain will share her experience on viral respiratory co-infections and provide an update on California's disease burden and epidemiology, as well as how to think about co-infections with winter respiratory viruses like influenza as we move into the winter months.
Please visit the California Medical Association website for registration details.
 
Marin County Schools and Marin County Public Health will provide an update on COVID-19 in Marin County and an overview of the Governor’s regional stay-at-home order and its impacts on Marin County schools on Tuesday, December 8, 2020 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM.  All Marin County school and parent/guardian communities are invited to  participate. Flyer attached (12.08.20).  Click here to join the Zoom webinar.  Dial In: +1 669-900-6833 | Webinar ID: 838-1396-3089# | Passcode: 083245. 

Sharing from the Marin Commission on Aging
You’re Invited
Thursday, December 10, 2020
10 - 11 a.m.
Town Hall Meeting with Senator Mike McGuire and Assemblyman Marc Levine. This event will focus on relevant issues for older adults in Marin County, including information and coordination during natural disasters, the COVID-19 pandemic, affordable housing, housing the homeless, and California’s Master Plan for Aging.
Senator Mike McGuire
Senator Mike McGuire represents the 2nd Senate District which includes Del bNorte, Humboldt, Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Sonoma and Trinity Counties. He was elected to the state senate in 2016 and has led efforts to invest in roads, bridges, and highways, is an advocate for strong public schools, and the environment.

Assemblyman Marc Levine
Assemblyman Marc Levine represents the 10th State Assembly District- Marin and Southern Sonoma Counties. He is focused on representing the local interests of Marin and Sonoma, protecting our environment, and supporting our schoolsand universities.

Moderated by:
Lee Pullen, Director, Area Agency on Aging, County of Marin

11:15 a.m. Commission on Aging Business Meeting
Members of the public are encouraged to attend!

MARIN COUNTY COMMISSION ON AGING

Join Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/8526641821?pwd=S3ZlQzdDQ0R0aC9INWo3Y0NwM01nQT09
Meeting ID: 852 664 1821
Passcode: 94903
Dial in number 1+ (669) 900-6833




Sharing from Marin Independent Journal
Marin will use hotels as emergency winter shelters for homeless
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: December 6, 2020 at 12:33 p.m. | UPDATED: December 6, 2020 at 12:33 p.m.
Marin County has budgeted fewer emergency shelter beds for the homeless this winter, but officials say the funds set aside will be sufficient to meet the need.
The amount of money budgeted, about $106,000 from the county’s general fund, is the same amount that was budgeted last year. This year, however, the money won’t go as far because homeless people can’t be housed in a congregate setting because of the coronavirus risk.
The previous two winters, the county’s plan called for housing the homeless at the Marin County Health and Wellness Campus at 3240 Kerner Blvd. in San Rafael. This year the county will pay for hotel rooms if weather conditions are deemed severe enough to warrant it.
“When we used a congregate setting, we had capacity for up to 80 people per night, and with the current criteria we have capacity for roughly 50 people,” said Ashley Hart-McIntyre, the county’s homelessness policy coordinator.
For full article: Marin will use hotels as emergency winter shelters for homeless
A Tidbit from Me:
It is estimated that on any given day nearly one-quarter (24%) of individuals experiencing homelessness (86,962 of 369,081 individuals) are people with disabilities who met the federal definition of experiencing chronic homelessness.
Source: HOMELESSNESS IN AMERICA:
Marin CIL’s core services include housing preservation, retention, and advocacy. Whether you are looking for housing or need support with housing retention or advocacy or to learn more about your rights Marin CIL is here for you! If you are a person with a disability or older adult please reach out to us. Marin CIL has been an active partner in addressing homelessness in Marin by advocating for accessible, affordable housing and rental protections through partnering with community members, the Marin Organizing Committee, Legal Aid of Marin, and Fair Housing Advocates[pm1]  of Northern California.

Sharing from Marin CIL’s own Eli

Master Plan on Aging and Fixing the LTSS System
By Eli Gelardin, Marin Center for Independent Living Executive Director
The Wheel is Broken
At this year’s AAI Convening, we had a dynamic discussion on Governor Newsom’s Master Plan on Aging (MPA). Recognizing that California’s older adult and disabled population is anticipated to grow to 8.6 million residents by 2030 (an increase in 4 million), Governor Newsom signed an executive order in June 2019 calling for a stakeholder advisory committee to present a draft Master plan on Aging by October 2020. The recommendations address four broad goals: Long-Term Services and Supports, Livable Communities, Health and Well-Being, and Economic Security and Safety and came with over 800 policy recommendations. Of these recommendations, two major themes emerged: 1) the need for the development of a coordinated system to expand access to long-term services and supports (LTSS) and 2) the need for the development of a financing mechanism to pay for LTSS and break the cycle of poverty for individuals who are aging, disabled, and/or caregivers.
Expanding a Coordinated System of LTSS
Access to long term services and supports (assistive technology, caregiving, care coordination, food access, housing, transportation etc.) is critical in order to keep Californians living safely in the community. Presently, our LTSS system is fragmented and difficult to navigate (2015 Senate Select Report, The Shattered System). To address this barrier, the MPA calls for a coordinated system of community-based long term services and supports that must ensure that individuals can choose where to live and provides access to the services and supports they need to honor their values and preferences. On the local level, a coordinated system of care means person-centered services that are coordinated by public, private, and healthcare partnerships.
A local example of this improved coordination is seen in Marin’s “One Door” Aging and Disability Resource Connection, a partnership between Marin Center for Independent Living and Marin County’s Aging and Adult Services and other key stakeholders that ensures older adults and individuals with disabilities get the services they need, without bouncing back and forth between multiple LTSS providers.
Financing Long Term Services and Supports
California faces an unprecedented crisis related to the financing of long-term services and supports. Typically, when paid services are needed, most Californians do not have the financial resources or reserves to cover these costs on an ongoing basis. Facing limited options, many older adults and individuals with disabilities are forced to spend down their life savings to qualify for public benefits. California’s In Home Support Services and other Medi-Cal waiver programs that support low-income older adults and individuals with disabilities such as Adult Day Health Care and Multi-Senior Services Program were not designed to accommodate an influx of 8 million additional recipients.
State leadership and action will be necessary to establish a new universal benefit that offers a flexible range of benefits that is sustainable and enables families of all incomes to plan and pay for their daily care needs both now and in the future. In addition, an LTSS benefit will provide a much-needed investment into building the infrastructure of the caregiver workforce. According to a PHI national, a majority of direct care workers are women, people of color (59%), and have a median wage of $12.27. Most caregivers do not receive health insurance, opportunities for professional development, or retirement planning. Investing in a care economy will provided a much-needed access to both individuals who receive care and equity for those that provide it.
COVID has spotlighted the consequence of a broken system and the dire impact of congregate living on isolated older adults, individuals with disabilities, and the caregiver workforce that supports them. According to the Kaiser Family Fund, COVID has accounted for more than 70,000 deaths of residents and staff as of mid-August and overall, people in long term care facilities make up 8 percent of coronavirus cases but 45 percent of all deaths. We cannot afford to force more individuals into social isolation and congregate living.  While the wheel of LTSS is broken, the state’s Master Plan on Aging provides a starting point for solutions. It is time to roll up our sleeves and get to work on fixing it.
Eli Gelardin serves as the CEO of the Marin Center for Independent Living (Marin CIL).  For the past 41 years Marin CIL has provided person centered services and advocacy to Marin’s aging and disabled communities with the goal of promoting equity & independence. 

Sharing from the Marin Public Charge Workgroup

What the Incoming Biden-Harris Administration Means for Public Charge?
 
Thu, Dec 10, 2020 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM PST
Show in My Time Zone
 
As we head into a new year and a new administration, the fate of the public charge regulation remains in question. Join our team of PIF experts for a deep dive into what the new year could bring and how we can be best prepared. On this webinar, we will outline the federal policy landscape, share strategies being considered as part of the rollback of President Trump’s public charge regulations, and identify things we can do to stay prepared for potential developments. We will also be joined by our legal experts who will share a litigation landscape. Register Here
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YMCA of San Francisco will host a virtual Town Hall
Wednesday, December 9, 2020, 5:30-6:30 pm 
To discuss Supporting Marin’s Most Vulnerable Students: Virtual Attendance, Hunger and Equity.  Panelists Mary Jane Burke, Dr. Matthew Willis and Marc Levine will discuss how health experts, school leaders and elected officials are collaborating to meet the needs of Marin County’s most vulnerable students and their families.  Moderated by Jamie Bruning-Miles, President & CEO, YMCA of San Francisco and Jon Eberly, Vice Chair, YMCA of San Francisco Board of Directors.  Register here.


The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 
 

Marin Covid-19 Update, EVV Stakeholder Meeting, FCC Requesting Comments on AT, and more


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 4, 2020

Good Morning to my Wondeful Family and Community,

I hope you are having a wonderful morning. Alot happening today including an imnportant Stakeholder meeting regarding California's implementation of the Electronic Visit Verification Program. This is breaking news....the notice for this meeting was published Wednesday evening. Let's get right to it! Here is the morning report for you. Enjoy the read!

County of Marin Update:
Marin County COVID-19 Status Update: December 3, 2020
The Marin County COVID-19 Status Update is published weekdays and as needed to share important news and resources related to the COVID-19 pandemic and to keep the local economy running. We remain here for you.
 
Governor Issues Stay At Home Order Triggered by Regional Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Capacity; Marin Spared For Now
As COVID-19 case rates and hospitalizations continue to rise and threaten to overwhelm the state’s health care delivery system, California health officials today announced a Regional Stay at Home Order that goes into effect if intensive care unit (ICU) capacity drops below 15 percent in a given region. No regions currently meet this threshold, but some are projected to within the next week.
State health officials are tracking ICU capacity across the state by five regions: Northern California, Bay Area, Greater Sacramento, San Joaquin Valley and Southern CaliforniaMarin County falls within the Bay Area region. 
Current available ICU capacity by region:

  • Bay Area: 25.4%
  • Greater Sacramento: 22%
  • Northern California: 18.6%
  • San Joaquin Valley: 19.7%
  • Southern California: 20.6%
If the Regional Stay at Home Order is triggered for a region of California, counties in the region will be subject to new restrictions. Residents within that region are required to stay at home as much as possible and minimize mixing to reduce unnecessary exposure, while still being able to do important things like go to the doctor, buy groceries, pick up take out, go on a hike, or worship outdoors. K-12 schools that are already open can remain open and retailers can operate indoors at no more than 20 percent capacity to reduce exposure risk.
Please read the State’s full news release for a list of business modifications and/or closures that will occur when the Regional Stay A Home Order is triggered, and a list of counties within each region.
 
 
Recap: Discussion of Programs Offered by Marin Health and Human Services
In cased you missed it, the Marin County Department of Health and Human Services recently held two virtual events providing an overview of the many programs and services they offer to our local community. With the COVID-19 pandemic continuing to impact our community, Marin HHS’s offerings are more crucial than ever before. The videos below highlight the discussion, which includes Adult and Child Protective Services, Suicide Prevention, CalFresh, Mobile Crisis and more.
NOVEMBER 17: ALL-ENGLISH EVENT
 
DECEMBER 1: ALL SPANISH EVENT

Sharing from the SILC

The FCC is seeking comments on the communication needs of incarcerated people with disabilities. 
Comment Period Closes:  December 22, 2020
 
On August 7, 2020, the FCC released a Report and Order on Remand and a Fourth Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to reform inmate calling service rates and charges.  As part of its Fourth Further Notice, the FCC seeks comment on the needs of incarcerated people with disabilities, including the types of telecommunications relay services (TRS) access technologies that these individuals require.
 
Currently, the FCC requires two forms of TRS: TTY-based TRS and speech-to-speech services. The FCC recognizes that newer forms of these services, such as Internet Protocol Captioned Telephone Service, Video Relay Service, and real-time text, have come to the market in part as a result of ?ongoing technology transitions from circuit switched to IP-based networks.?
 
The FCC seeks comment broadly on the needs of incarcerated people with hearing or speech disabilities, including whether they have adequate access to TRS and whether additional forms of TRS should be made available.
 
Interested parties may file comments by accessing the Electronic Comment Filing System at https://www.fcc.gov/ecfs/filingsAll filings must reference WC Docket No. 12-375.  People with disabilities who need assistance to file comments online may request assistance by email to FCC504@fcc.gov
 
Report and Order on Remand and Fourth Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking:
URL:  https://www.fcc.gov/document/fcc-seeks-reduce-rates-and-charges-inmate-calling-services-0
PDF:  https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/FCC-20-111A1.pdf
Text:  https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/FCC-20-111A1.txt 
 
PN Announcing Comment Due Dates:
URL:  https://www.fcc.gov/document/wcb-announces-comment-dates-ics-proceeding  
Word:  https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/DA-20-1256A1.docx 
PDF:  https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/DA-20-1256A1.pdf 
Text:  https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/DA-20-1256A1.txt 
 
For further information, please contact Erik Raven-Hansen of the Wireline Competition Bureau at (202) 418-1532 or Erik.Raven-Hansen@fcc.gov .  Individuals who use videophones and are fluent in American Sign Language (ASL) may call the FCC?s ASL Consumer Support Line at (844) 432-2275 (videophone).
 

Sharing from Department of Developmental Services (DDS): Important EVV Stakeholder Meeting Happening Today 9-11 am

On December 4, 2020, the California Departments of Health Care Services (DHCS), Developmental Services (DDS), Social Services (CDSS), Public Health (CDPH), and Aging (CDA) and the Office of Systems Integration (OSI) will hold a stakeholder meeting on EVV Phase II via webinar from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. The goal of the webinar is to provide a status update on Phase II efforts and to discuss the release of the draft Request for Proposal (RFP).  Once the draft RFP is released, DHCS will post a link to the RFP on the DHCS EVV Phase II webpage.
The webinar registration link and teleconference information will be posted on the DHCS EVV Phase II Meetings webpage in advance of the meeting. This webinar will build upon discussions held during the previous EVV Phase II stakeholder meeting on March 3, 2020.

EVV is a telephone and computer-based system that electronically verifies in-home service visits. All states must implement EVV for Medicaid-funded personal care services (PCS) and home health care services (HHCS).  The state is in the process of selecting a vendor and procuring an EVV solution for EVV Phase II, which includes programs at DHCS, DDS, CDPH, CDSS, and CDA as listed below:
  • DDS 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Waivers, including the Self-Determination Program
  • DDS 1915(i) State Plan Home and Community-Based Services
  • DHCS 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Alternatives Waiver
  • DHCS Home Health Care Services
  • CDA/DHCS Multipurpose Senior Services Program 1915(c) and 1115 Waiver
  • CDPH/DHCS 1915(c) AIDS Medi-Cal Waiver
For questions about the EVV Phase II stakeholder meeting, or to be added to the stakeholder list, please email EVV@dhcs.ca.gov. For more information about EVV Phase II, please visit the DHCS website or DDS website.
What is EVV?
The 21st Century CURES Act, signed into law in 2016, requires that States set up an EVV system to verify that services for all Medicaid-funded personal care and home health care services occurred. Under the Act, an EVV system must verify the following service components:
  1. Type of service performed;
  2. Individual receiving the service;
  3. Date of the service;
  4. Location of service delivery;
  5. Individual providing the services; and
  6. Time the service begins and ends.
The new requirements for EVV will not change where and how these services are delivered. All states must implement EVV for personal care services by January 2020 and home health care services by January 2023. In accordance with federal provisions, the State submitted a Good Faith Effort Exemption (GFE) request on October 2, 2019 to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to extend the EVV implementation date for personal care services to January 2021. On October 22, 2019, CMS approved the State’s GFE request for personal care services, and will not apply Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) reductions in calendar year 2020. More information on California’s GFE approval letter from CMS is available on the DHCS EVV Webpage.
Phase I: Self-Directed Model for providers of In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) and Waiver Personal Care Services (WPCS) who use Case Management Information & Payrolling System (CMIPS) and the Electronic Timesheet and Telephone Timesheet Systems.
Phase II: Non-IHSS/WPCS individual providers, or agencies that provide Personal Care Services (PCS) and/or Home Health Care Services (HHCS) to eligible Medi-Cal beneficiaries. Includes both PCS and HHCS programs. These are agencies that provide PCS and/or HHCS to eligible Medi-Cal beneficiaries, and non-IHSS or WPCS self-directed and individual providers who do the same.
A Tidbit from Me: In the initial discussions with California and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) which is a Federal program. California’s proposed EVV plan was to track whether services were provided in a community setting or at home without requiring the use of GPS to verify where the service is occurring. Most recently CMS informed California that GPS or some other geo-tracking system would be required in order to be in compliance with the EVV program. It is my understanding the discussions are still occurring between California and CMS. GPS or geo-tracking won’t be necessary if a service is being performed away from someone’s home in the community however GPS or geo-tracking will be required when services are provided at someone’s home. For example if an In-home support services provider starts a shift at someone’s home and uses a cellphone the GPS must be activated to verify the services are provided in someone’s home. This has raised tremendous concern for many of us in the disability community as well as providers and unions that represent home care providers. Some stakeholders and providers do support EVV as a way to maintain program integrity.

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

Emotional Support Animals on Airlines, Marin Covid Update, Thinking About Running for Office


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 3, 2020

Good Morning my Brothers and Sisters in Community,
I hope you all are doing well today. It is high-speed, low-drive for me. Lots going on this week. Today many of our Marin CIL team are attending the exciting Independent Living Conference hosted by California Foundation  for Independent Living Centers (CFILC) and California Area Agencies on Aging (C4A). Here is the PM Report for you. Have a fabulous day.
Tipping my hat to you this morning…over a cup of coffee

Marin County COVID-19 Status Update: December 2, 2020
The Marin County COVID-19 Status Update is published weekdays and as needed to share important news and resources related to the COVID-19 pandemic and to keep the local economy running. We remain here for you.
 
VIDEO: Message from the Public Health Officer
Marin’s Public Health Officer, Dr. Matt Willis, provides an update on Marin County’s status within the State’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy. In addition to highlighting some of the successes that have helped Marin County maintain a lower case rate than much of the state, he also warns that cases continue to increase in Marin and its too early to relax. 
WATCH ON YOUTUBE.
 
 
Wanted: Public Health Nurses to Join our COVID-19 Response Team
Do you have a nursing background? Are you interested in part-time work while contributing to Marin’s COVID-19 response?  We have a job for you! 
Marin Health and Human Services has an immediate opening for a Public Health Nurse. Public Health Nurses are an important member of our Communicable Disease Prevention and Control Team, assisting with coordination of testing, communicable disease investigation, and communicating with residents and providers about COVID-19.
For more information about our Public Health Nurse position, or other available jobs with the County of Marin, please visit marincounty.org/jobs.

Sharing from USA Today
New DOT rule paves the way for airlines to ban emotional support animals on flights
Julia Thompson
USA TODAY
The Department of Transportation announced Wednesday it will revise rules around flying with emotional support animals and will no longer consider them to be service animals, which are required by law to be allowed to fly with passengers on commercial airlines. 
The revised Air Carrier Access Act rules define a service animal as "a dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of a person with a disability," according to a release from the U.S. DOT. 
The DOT notes it no longer considers an emotional support animal to be a service animal, paving the way for airlines to ban them if they don't fit established rules about pets. 
Policies will be set by individual airlines but must conform to the DOT rules, which will go into effect 30 days after the final ruling is published in the Federal Register, though that date has not yet been announced. 
The changes are a departure from the previous DOT guidance issued last year, which said that airlines could not restrict passengers from traveling with emotional support animals, nor could they ban a specific breed or species of support animal.
Airlines are currently prohibited from refusing service dogs based on their breed, and that prohibition will continue under the new rules. 
Airlines have also questioned whether some passengers may be trying to pass off their pets as support animals – be they cats, rabbits or birds, among others – in order to avoid paying the associated fees.
For full article: New DOT rule paves the way for airlines to ban emotional support animals on flights
A Tidbit from Me: Emotional support, according to the Air Carriers Access Act, current regulations state “a service animal is any animal that is individually trained or able to provide assistance to a person with a disability; or any animal that assists persons with disabilities by providing emotional support.” Airlines may require proof from a medical provider or physician that you are a person with a disability and require the use of an emotional support animal as an accommodation for air travel. The letter from your doctor , in most cases, needs to be dated within one year from your flight. Additionally, most airlines require advance notice anywhere form 24-72 hours. It is important to check with the airline on which you are going to be travelling in advance of your trip to ensure that you have enough time to get the documentation necessary for your flight. If you need support or assistance planning your  disability accommodations for your flight please reach out to us.

Sharing from Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California

Fair Housing in Times of COVID-19 Panel

Wednesday, December 9, 2020
12:00 to 1:30 pm

 
​Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California will present the upcoming panel: “Fair Housing in Times of COVID-19,” on Wednesday, December 9, 12:00 to 1:30 pm via Zoom. The panel will address COVID-19 trends and impacts affecting protected classes, and strategies and recovery efforts underway at the local and state levels. Panelists will discuss how the pandemic is disproportionally affecting vulnerable communities, including ethnic and racial minorities, women, victims of domestic violence and sexual harassment, and people with disabilities.  
 
The forum is appropriate for housing advocates, staff of service organizations, elected officials, city and county staff, community leaders, and tenants.
 
Panelists include Omar Carrera, Chief Executive Officer, Canal Alliance; Liz Darby, Social Equity Program and Policy Coordinator, County of Marin; Felicity Gasser, HCD Specialist II, Federal Programs, California Department of Housing & Community Development; Julia Howard-Gibbon, Supervising Attorney, Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California; Moderator: Caroline Peattie, Executive Director, Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California
 
Click here to register
A Zoom link will be emailed prior to the event
 
For more information or special needs, please contact Adriana Ames at adriana@fairhousingnorcal.org.
 
This program is based on work supported by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) under FHIP EOI Grant.FEO2I00219. Any opinion, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of HUD.

Sharing from our Brothers and Sisters at the National Council on Independent Living (NCIL) our National Membership Organization
Elevate Blog Are you a Person with a Disability and Want to Run for Office? This is for you
Elevate Blog: Want to Run for Office? Think Local
December 2, 2020 By theadvocacymonitor Leave a Comment
Did you know that there are 519,682 elected positions in the United States? When we think of elected officials, we often think about the President and members of Congress. However, there are only 542 federal offices. Our state governments make up only 3.6% of the elected positions in the country. Local elected officials are 96% the elected officials in the country. There are over 500,000 local elected positions in the country.
If you are considering running for office for the first time, think local. There are many different positions in local government, such as:
  • City council
  • Mayor
  • School board
  • County commissioner
  • Positions requiring specific knowledge, like auditor or coroner
Each local government has a different structure, and different elected offices. You should research what positions are available in your community. Think about how you want to be involved in your community. Do you want to change laws? Are you interested in education? Do you have specific skills in an area like finance or engineering? Some offices require specific knowledge and training, while others are open to everyone.
Holding a local office allows you to serve your community directly. Big, sweeping legislation at the national level is important. But the fact is that local government has a large influence on our lives. School board members make decisions on education for children in their community. Mayors and city councils make many small and large decisions to run a city. Local government influences law, finances, education, community programs, and more.
Running for local office makes practical sense for a first-time candidate. It costs money to get on the ballot and to run a campaign. A local campaign usually requires a smaller budget than state or federal races. A local campaign may require a smaller time commitment, and you may be able to keep your current job. Keeping your job is important if the position you’re running for doesn’t have a salary or has a low salary.
Local campaigns make strategic sense as well. If you want to run for a larger office someday, you need to build name recognition. Having name recognition means that voters know who you are and what you represent. If you are active in your local community, you may have name recognition. You may be known as a community member, a volunteer, or an advocate, for example. In a campaign, you build more name recognition through campaigning. This lets voters know who you are and why they should vote for you. Running for and serving in local office can help build name recognition for future state and federal races. It will also help you gain experience that will make you a better candidate in future races.
Have we convinced you to consider running for local office? Here are some resources to learn more: Source: Elevate Blog: Want to Run for Office? Think Local

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 
 

Happy 45th Birthday of IDEA, Marin Covid-19 Update, Housing Rights During Covid, and More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 2, 2020

Good Morning my Brothers and Sisters in Community,
I hope you are doing well this morning. It has been a busy morning in the Mendoza household. My Bat-phone rang early. Like all of us today there is quite a bit on my calendar. Wishing you all the very best. Sending you a smile this morning. Enjoy the read! This morning report is for you.


County of Marin Update

 
Blueprint Update: Marin Remains In Tier 2 (“Red”)
Today, California Department of Public Health (CDPH) provided another update on the Blueprint for a Safer Economy, a statewide plan for reducing COVID-19 and keeping Californians healthy and safe.
CDPH confirmed Marin County’s placement in Tier 2 (red status) for a third straight week. Marin County is one of only six California Counties not in Tier 1 (purple status), which is the most restrictive Tier of the blueprint.
CDPH’s December 1, 2020 assessment for Marin County includes:

CDPH’s update was based on data from November 19 to November 25 with a four-day lag. Marin’s adjusted case rate and test positivity rate have increased by 1.0 and 0.3%, respectively, since CDPH’s analysis on Saturday, November 28.
Marin’s Blueprint progress:

  • August 28: Blueprint introduced; Marin placed in Tier 1
  • September 15: Marin graduates to Tier 2
  • October 27: Marin graduates to Tier 3
  • November 16: Marin moved back to Tier 2
For Marin County to move forward, we must (1) have been in the current tier for a minimum of three weeks; and (2) meet criteria for the next less restrictive tier for all measures for the prior two consecutive weeks in order to progress to the next tier.
Follow Marin’s day-by-day blueprint data on our State Metrics for Marin County webpage.
 
 
Recap: Special webinar for Youth Sports Organizers
In case you missed it, Marin Public Health and Marin Recovers held a special webinar this afternoon specifically for youth sports organizations, clubs or providers to discuss ways to reduce COVID-19 infections among youth athletes and supporters. 
Our local contact tracers are noticing a disturbing, growing trend: transmission of COVID-19 through youth sports. The main reason for this ranges from teams not wearing masks or following youth sports guidance, to teams traveling to areas outside of Marin County and bringing infections back with them.
Archive of the webinar can be found online and is linked below. Please forward this information to any sports providers, coaches or trainers you may know so we can stop this trend.
WATCH ON YOUTUBE
 

Happy 45th Birthday Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA)! Sharing from Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund (DREDF)
I'd Rather...The IDEA
by Meriah Nichols, Unpacking Disability, and DREDF Board Member
Here is a short video explaining it.
The IDEA Changes Our Lives
The IDEA is 45 years on November 29, 2020. In those 45 years, it has provided the path upon which all of us with a disability can access an education. "Prior to its passage in 1975, at least one million children with disabilities in the United States were denied any public education, and at least four million more were segregated from their non-disabled peers...the IDEA guarantees children with disabilities a free, appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE)." (DREDF)
The IDEA protects and provides for people with disabilities, and that means accommodations for all disabilities: from reading to writing, hearing to seeing, mobility to intellectual and everything in between and on the sides. It covers us all. It opens the door to us all and prepares a place at the table for every one of us.
DREDF is an integral part of the ongoing mission to help (non-disabled) parents and all of us who have disabilities to better understand and advocate for our children, for ourselves. There are some exciting initiatives from DREDF, education programs and partnerships. Stay tuned to them here.

Thinking back to the game that my son loves to play, "would you rather?"
I think about the world before the Education for All Handicapped Children Act was enacted by the United States Congress in 1975, before it was signed into law by President Gerald Ford on November 29 of that same year, before it evolved into what we now call IDEA in 1990: the lack of educational access, the restrictive environments for the few spaces that did welcome us. I think about the advances we have made in the past 45 years, the advances we have yet to make. I think about the fact that every member of my own family has benefitted from the passage and implementation of the IDEA, and I think about the organizations like DREDF that work hard and long to make sure that the IDEA is able to do its job. I'm grateful to live in this here and now and be able to turn to my son and honestly, happily say, "I would rather live now!"
Happy birthday, IDEA! Thank you for opening the world for us
For Full Article: I'd Rather...The IDEA
A Tidbit from Me: The 45th anniversary of IDEA has a special meaning to me and my family. When IDEA was signed into law by President Gerald Ford it was then known as Public law 94-142. While many disability rights organizations and disability rights advocates worked steadfastly to enact this ground breaking legislation there was a group of parents from Marin including my Mom (Ruth Anne Mendoza) who were also in the fight to ensure that children like me and my brother Michael would have equal access to education in the least restrictive environment and services and supports through the school system. My Mom was involved in the passage of the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Act signed in to law by, then Governor, Ronald Reagan. My Mom, through her role as Vice-President of the Marin Developmental Disabilities Council and Vice-President of the Marin Autism Society, advocated for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including children, who were often institutionalized in what is now known as the state hospital system to be moved from institutions into the community with the necessary services and supports. I personally benefitted from the work of advocates like my Mom and would not be where I am today if it were not for laws like Public Law 94-142/ IDEA. Honoring and missing her today.

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal

Marin coronavirus vaccinations could begin in late December
By WILL HOUSTON | whouston@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: December 1, 2020 at 6:10 p.m. | UPDATED: December 2, 2020 at 6:58 a.m.
Marin County health officials expect to begin the first coronavirus vaccinations as soon as late December with a priority on immunizing frontline health care workers first.
The vaccine developed by the Manhattan-based Pfizer company is anticipated to be the first to gain U.S. approval sometime in mid-December. Pfizer’s vaccine must be transported and stored at ultra-cold temperatures of at least -94 degrees Fahrenheit — more than four times colder than the South Pole in Antarctica was at noontime Monday.
This requires specialized freezers typically only found at college campuses and research institutes. Fortunately, Marin County has both.
Three local research institutions — BioMarin, the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and Dominican University — are offering the county their ultra-cold freezers for free once the vaccines arrive.
“Fortunately in Marin, we’re able to leverage these public-private partnerships and all three of those partners eagerly stepped forward to offer resources,” Marin County Public Health Officer Matt Willis said. “We’ve got freezers identified at those three locations, which are going to allow us to store the Pfizer vaccine within Marin.
“Those become local hubs of distribution for the doses that would go along with the very first phases,” Willis continued. “So we’re talking about the first tier, which is not the general public. We’re talking about essential health care workers, hospital workers, staff at long-term care facilities, first responders and other highest priority groups that are part of our critical infrastructure.”
The Pfizer vaccine requires two doses spaced out three weeks to be effective. At least 10,000 people in Marin County will need to receive vaccines in the first phase, Willis said, which means at least 20,000 Pfizer vaccine doses will be needed.
Exactly how many doses Marin will receive in the first round is unclear, Willis said. Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Monday that the state will be receiving 327,000 doses of the Pfizer vaccine in mid-December assuming the U.S. Food and Drug Administration grants emergency approval to distribute it.
For Full Article: Marin coronavirus vaccinations could begin in late December
A Tidbit from Me: I am excited to hear about the Covid-19 vaccine potentially being available soon and want to express appreciation to Marin County Public Health ( in particular Dr. Matt Willis, Marin Health Officer and Dr. Lisa Santora, Deputy Health Officer), BioMarin, The Buck Institute for Research on Aging and Dominican University for their important role supporting the roll-out of the vaccine. While I am pleased about this progress I am mindful of the tremendous toll Covid-19 has cost the world community. I am also thinking about the people who live in skilled nursing facilities and other institutions including correctional facilities. Many of those affected are people with disabilities and are our Brothers and Sisters in the independent living / disability rights movement.  

Sharing from CDCAN
DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES EXTENDS EXPIRATION DATES OF PREVIOUSLY ISSUED DIRECTIVES IMPACTING EARLY START, RESPITE, PARENTAL FEES, IN-PERSON MEETINGS, PARTICIPANT DIRECTED SERVICES, HALF-DAY BILLING AND MORE 

SACRAMENTO, CA [BY MARTY OMOTO, CDCAN LAST UPDATED 12/01/2020 07:14 PM (PACIFIC TIME] - As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread uncontrolled across the nation and in California, the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) this afternoon (December 1st)  extended the expiration dates of seven previously issued directives, with new expiration dates for six into January and one extended to the end of December. No changes were made to any of the seven directives with the exception of the expiration dates (and previously made changes that were made to some of the directives earlier in the summer).
    Included in those seven directives that were extended was a previous directive issued October 2nd, that waived the half day billing requirement in state law, retroactive to September 1, 2020, for traditional day services. This waiver does not apply to services provided under what is known as "Alternative Non-residential Services". 
     
    The Department of Developmental Services oversees the 21 non-profit regional centers who determinate eligibility and coordinate funding for community-based services and supports provided by community-based organizations and individuals for over 350,000 children and adults with developmental disabilities,
    The department - under the California Health and Human Services agency - also oversees statewide through the 21 non-profit regional centers the state's early intervention program - called "Early Start" that serves approximately 30,000 infants and toddlers
    CDCAN NOTE: To receive the free CDCAN Reports, send email request to Marty Omoto (with "CDCAN Reports Subscribe" in the subject line) to: martyomoto@att.net

Governor's March 12th Executive Order Gave Authority to DDS Director To Issue Directives Waiving Any Provision or Requirement of Lanterman Act or Early Intervention Act 
    As previously reported by CDCAN during the State of Emergency, Governor Gavin Newsom's March 12, 2020 executive order (see below for link) authorized the director of the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) to issue directives or guidance waiving any provision or requirement of the landmark state law known as the "Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act" and also the California Early Intervention Services Act due to COVID-19, with an expiration date of 30 days - with 30 day extensions as needed.  That is why the department is required to issue directives waiving an existing state law with expiration dates of 30 days, that can be extended (and have been for at least six previously issued directives). 

    The directive issued August 31, 2020 that authorized "Alternative Non-residential Services" as an option to providing other types of services to people who currently are not allowed (under current state public health directive on gatherings) to attend site-based programs, however does NOT have an expiration date. That directive was issued under a different executive order by the Governor (Executive Order N-75-20 issued on August 24, 2020, that suspended Title 17, California Code of Regulations section 54326(a)(11). 

    Some directives issued by the Department of Developmental Services have no expiration date either because the directive was providing only information or does not change state law, and remains in effect unless rescinded by the Department of Developmental Services. 

Sharing from the Marin CIL's Friends and Partners Legal Aid of Marin
How To Protect Yourself From Eviction

1. Sign a declaration found at www.legalaidmarin.org/covid-19 that says you are
unable to pay rent due to effects of COVID-19 (Coronavirus) on your work or
life.
2. Give the signed declaration to your landlord, master tenant, and/or owner.
Repeat for every month you cannot pay the full rent.
3. Make sure to pay 25% of rent owed between September 1 and January 31 at
any time before January 31, 2021.
4. Keep a copy (or take a photo) of your payment and all declarations you submit.

Your Landlord/Master Tenant Cannot:
• Lock you out of your home
• Threaten to call ICE and/or sheriffs
• Cut off utilities or take away services that are provided in your
lease
• Harass or threaten you to force you to move out
• Ask for any additional financial documents
Call Legal Aid of Marin at 415-492-023
Free and Confidential Help
Ask us about your housing rights and public charge
 
FAQs: COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Tenant Protections

Can my landlord evict me for not paying rent during the Pandemic?
NO. If you have lost wages due to the pandemic, your landlord CANNOT evict you during this
time. California passed the COVID-19 Tenant Relief Act of 2020 (AB 3088) which prohibits
evictions for non-payment of rent due to loss of income that is COVID-19-related.
What does “COVID-19-related” mean?
You are protected from eviction if you lost wages due to the Pandemic. This includes if you
were unable to work due to childcare issues, if you had to care for a sick family member, or if
you yourself got sick.
What if I couldn’t pay my rent for the months of March 2020 through August 2020?
A landlord cannot evict you for rent owed during this time. HOWEVER, you are still responsible
for the rent owed and your landlord may take you to small claims court. You can also make a
repayment plan with your landlord, but only do this if you have returned to work. Paying for
food and medicine should come first.
What if I cannot pay rent for the months of September 2020 through January 2021?
If you are not able to pay rent for a COVID-19-related reason, your landlord cannot evict you.
However, you are required to pay 25% of total rent owed from September 2020 through
January 2021 by the end of January 2021. You do not need to pay 25% each month!
Your landlord should give you a 15-Day Notice to vacate the property with an attached
Declaration stating that you are unable to pay rent due to Covid-19 for each month during this
time period. If you are unable to pay rent, sign, date and submit the Declaration to your
landlord within 15 days. You can also find a copy of the Declaration on Legal Aid of Marin’s
website.
What kind of units do the protections apply to?
The prohibition on evictions applies to all units, even if you are renting a room or part of a room
in a unit.
Who is protected by this law?
All renters! You are protected even if you are a subtenant or are undocumented.
What if I pay rent and/or have a lease with a master tenant?
A master tenant has the same obligations as a landlord under the law! The master
tenant MUST go through the same eviction process as a landlord.
What if my master tenant stops paying rent?
Keep records of every rent payment that you make. Try and pay your landlord/manager
directly. Submit your own declaration to the landlord/manager and keep a copy. Taking a
photo of your rent payment, declaration, or any other important documents is fine.
What if my master tenant abandons the unit?
You are still a tenant by law if you have lived in the unit for more than 30 days. The landlord
MUST go through court to have you evicted. A landlord is not obligated to enter into a lease
with you, but you can try – no guarantees.
Do I need to pay 25% of the rent every month?
No. You can pay 25% of the total months owed by January 31, 2021.
Example: If your rent is $1000 per month, then the total rent owed from September to January
will be $5000. You must pay $1250 BY JANUARY 31, 2021 in order to avoid eviction.
Can I pay more than 25% of the rent if I am able to?
Yes, you can pay as much as you want. Just make sure it is at least 25% of the rent owedbetween September 1, 2020 and January 31, 2021. For any partial payments during this time, make sure your landlord understands that you are paying towards the 25% required by the new law. You can write this in the memo line of your rent check or include a letter with your payment. We suggest you keep a receipt and copies of any payments you make to your landlord.
What if I get a letter demanding that I pay rent? What if I get an eviction or notice to vacate?
Seek legal advice immediately. Your landlord can serve you a “Notice to Pay or Quit” but DO
NOT PANIC! Just submit your declaration as stated above. Your landlord cannot force you to
leave your unit or to pay rent while the current protections are in place. If your landlord
threatens you with forcible removal or locks you out of your unit, you should call the police.
Contact us at (415) 492-0230. Our services are free and confidential.
Can the Landlord call the Police on me or lock me out if I do not pay all past due rent by
January 31, 2021?
No. A landlord or master tenant MUST serve you a valid eviction notice and go through the
court process to have you removed from your home. If your landlord or master tenant locks
you out of your home, call the police – it will help if you are able to show pictures of the rent
you have paid on your phone.
Do I have to enter into a payment plan with my landlord?
No, your landlord cannot force you to enter into a payment plan for unpaid rent. However, if
you choose to enter into a payment plan, seek legal advice to review the agreement before
signing. Contact us at (415) 492-0230. Our services are free and confidential.
If I seek legal advice or get help paying may rent from a non-profit organization, will I be
considered a public charge?
No! Seeking legal or rental assistance DOES NOT jeopardize your legal status. You will NOT be
considered a public charge if you get help. For more information on public charge, contact us at
(415) 492-0230. Our services are free and confidential.
Can my landlord raise my rent during the COVID-19 emergency?
Your landlord can raise your rent, but is limited by state and local regulations. If you get a rent
increase of more than 6% of your current rent, seek legal advice in determining if the rent
increase is legal. Contact us at (415) 492-0230. Our services are free and confidential.
Can my landlord harass me for not paying rent?
No. Your landlord cannot retaliate against you if you do not pay rent. The landlord cannot lock
you out of your home, threaten to call ICE/sheriff, cut off utilities, take away services that are
provided in your lease, or harass you to move out. If you experience any sort of harassment as
result of not paying rent under the new law, please call us.

Legal Aid of Marin Covid-19

A Tidbit from Me:  Marin CIL’s core services include housing preservation, retention, and advocacy. Whether you are looking for housing or need support with housing retention or advocacy or to learn more about your rights Marin CIL is here for you! If you are a person with a disability or older adult please reach out to us.

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

Marin Covid-19 Update, Affordable Housing Project Approved in Marin City, and News from DREDF


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on December 1, 2020



 

Good Morning my Brothers and Sisters in Community,

I hope you are doing well today. Today I got up before the chickens…it is a multiple coffee day for me. Lot’s of great work to do today. Here’s my morning report for you. Sending you a smile this morning.

County of Marin Update:
Marin County COVID-19 Status Update: November 30, 2020
The Marin County COVID-19 Status Update is published weekdays and as needed to share important news and resources related to the COVID-19 pandemic and to keep the local economy running. We remain here for you.
  
State Announces Temporary Tax Relief for COVID-19 Impacted Businesses
Governor Gavin Newsom today announced that California will provide temporary tax relief for eligible businesses impacted by COVID-19 restrictions. The temporary tax relief entails an automatic three-month income tax extension for taxpayers filing less than $1 million in sales tax, extends the availability of existing interest and penalty-free payment agreements to companies with up to $5 million in taxable sales and provides expanded interest free payment options for larger businesses particularly affected by significant restrictions on operations based on COVID-19 transmissions.
In addition, the Governor announced the creation of a $500 million COVID Relief Grant for small businesses that have been impacted by COVID and the health and safety restrictions. Funds would be awarded to selected intermediaries with established networks of Community Development Financial Institutions to distribute relief through grants of up to $25,000 to underserved micro and small businesses throughout the state by early 2021. Non-profits would also be eligible for these grants. The California Office of the Small Business Advocate (CalOSBA) is establishing the program and will make it available to small businesses as soon as possible.
For further details on both program, continue reading the Governor’s news release.
  

Marin City Affordable Housing Gets Green Light
Community Development Agency approves new 74-unit multifamily facility
San Rafael, CA – Aligning with one of Marin County’s biggest civic needs – more affordable housing – a new 74-unit multifamily housing complex in Marin City has received approval from the Marin County Community Development Agency (CDA).
The applicant, AMG & Associates of Encino, California, is proposing to construct a 73,793-square-foot multifamily apartment building on the site of the Village Baptist Church in the 800 block of Drake Avenue in Marin City. It would involve construction of a five-story building, 56 feet 8 inches tall, with 74 units. The applicant proposes a mix of one-, two-, and three-bedroom units ranging in size from 592 to 1,128 square feet per unit. 
Except for one manager’s apartment, every unit would be designated for households that qualify as very low and extremely low income. For example, a four-person household with an annual income of up to $87,000 would be considered very low income, and a two-person household with an annual income of up to $41,800 would be considered extremely low income. More information about qualifying income limits for affordable housing units is on the Marin Housing Authority website.
The development includes an 80% density bonus under state law, which adds 33 units above the 41-unit maximum allowable under the Countywide Plan, because of the significant level of affordability that will be achieved. 
The affordable housing development is financed entirely by private investors under a state tax credit and will not require any County of Marin or other public funding. The applicant has indicated construction would start in 2021 and finish within 21 months.
CDA staff has posted the development plans online. It’s the first development proposal submitted to the County under a new state law intended to streamline certain types of housing developments to address California’s severe housing shortage and affordability crisis. The law, Senate Bill (SB) 35, applies to cities and counties that have not met their state-mandated Regional Housing Need Allocation targets. To facilitate the development of housing in Marin and elsewhere, which, in the past, has often been met with community opposition and a lengthy review process, state law now limits local review to compliance with adopted objective development standards and bypasses public hearings. The law requires the County to utilize a new review procedure that does not provide the level of public participation that residents and County planners are used to.
“While there are critics of the streamlined process that we are required to follow, County staff planners have applied the utmost rigor in reviewing this application to confirm it met all requirements under state law as well as the County’s well-established zoning and development standards,” said Tom Lai, CDA’s Interim Director.
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL in collaboration with many community partners including Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California, Legal Aid of Marin, and the Marin Organizing Committee worked together to promote accessible affordable housing for people who have very low and extremely low income. Marin CIL exists to assist persons with all types of disabilities to achieve their maximum level of sustainable independence as contributing, responsible and equal participants in society. Everyone deserves an accessible and affordable home.

Sharing from Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund (DREDF)

DREDF Comments Urging TCAC to Adopt Increased Accessibility Standards
November 20, 2020
On Friday, November 20th, DREDF submitted comments strongly urging California's Tax Credit Allocation Committee (TCAC) to adopt proposed regulatory changes that would increase the number of required mobility and sensory access features in new Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) developments. The LIHTC program is one of the state's largest affordable housing development programs. TCAC initially proposed cutting these accessible housing requirements in half, but in response to overwhelming and compelling public testimony, TCAC has now proposed to increase accessible housing in new construction projects. If adopted, these regulatory changes provide an opportunity for California to address the accessibility gap in our state and set an example for the rest of the nation.
Source: DREDF Comments Urging TCAC to Adopt Increased Accessibility Standards

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Legislative Hearing Happening Now, EVV Stakeholder Meeting Today, and Much More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on November 30, 2020

Good Morning my Brothers and Sisters in Community,

I hope you all had a wonderful Thanksgiving. At the Mendoza house we sheltered-in-place over a Thanksgiving lunch with those who are in our bubble. We incorporated Zoom which provided an opportunity for my Dad and my brother and Jen’s Uncle to join us. My brother Michael turned 55 years old on Thanksgiving. The Mendoza ensemble sang “Happy Birthday”. We sounded ok but we are a long way from Carnegie Hall. I am thankful for each of you. Wishing you all the very best. Here is my PM Morning Report for you.
In Community,
Peter


Marin County Update:
SPECIAL WEEKEND EDITION
The Marin County COVID-19 Status Update is published weekdays and as needed to share important news and resources related to the COVID-19 pandemic and to keep the local economy running. We remain here for you.
With rising COVID-19 cases across the Bay Area and new announcements today from the California Department of Public Health, we are issuing a special weekend edition of the Marin County COVID-19 Status Update to help equip you with the very latest information.  
 
 
Statement in Support of Santa Clara County’s New COVID Measures:
Health officers from four Bay Area counties and the City of Berkeley today are expressing their support for Santa Clara County’s new health order restricting higher-risk activities to reduce the likelihood of hospitals becoming overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients.
Santa Clara County officials estimate that hospitals in their county will reach or exceed capacity in the coming weeks if they do not take decisive action to stem the spread of COVID.
Given their situation, Santa Clara County officials announced they would enact new rules for businesses and residents, which go into effect on Monday, Nov. 30.
The new rules reduce the number of customers allowed in stores at a given time, limit hotels to only essential travel and require travelers coming into Santa Clara County from distances greater than 150 miles to quarantine for 14 days. They also temporarily prohibit youth, collegiate, and professional contact sports in Santa Clara County.
While health officials in neighboring Bay Area counties say they haven’t reached the same critical point as Santa Clara, they may also have to take similar actions soon in order to preserve remaining regional hospital capacity to treat both COVID and non-COVID medical conditions, such as severe illnesses caused by flu.  A month ago, there were 262 people hospitalized with COVID in the Bay Area; as of yesterday, that number had nearly tripled to 759.
That’s why Health Officers in Alameda County, Contra Costa County, Marin County, San Francisco, and the City of Berkeley are expressing their unified support for Santa Clara County’s decision.
“COVID doesn’t care about borders or county lines. What is happening in Santa Clara County now may reach that level elsewhere in the Bay Area in the near future,” said Dr. Chris Farnitano, Contra Costa County’s Health Officer.
“We’ve gained so much ground in keeping Marin’s testing positivity and hospitalization rates low,” said Dr. Lisa Santora, Deputy Public Health Officer. “We need to do what we can to keep our essential operations open. If we begin to see what Santa Clara is experiencing, this action can help protect the critical functions in our community including site-based school learning.”
Dr. Farnitano, Dr. Santora and other Health Officers urged people to continue taking basic safety precautions to protect themselves and others from COVID:

  • Wear face coverings when around people you don’t live with
  • Stay home as much as possible. If you must go out, limit yourself to essential activities, such as grocery shopping or getting healthcare
  • Avoid mixing with people from other households
  • Maintain physical distancing from others
  • Wash your hands regularly
 
 
State updates Blueprint county tiers; Marin retains Tier 2 status
Today, California Department of Public Health (CDPH) updated the Blueprint for a Safer Economy county tiers based on data from November 16 to November 22, 2020 (with a four-day lag). Typically, Blueprint updates are announced weekly on Tuesdays, but CDPH reserves the right to update Blueprint numbers more frequently, as needed.
Despite seeing an uptick in cases, Marin County retained its Tier 2 (“red”) status and is now the only county in the greater Bay Area to be out of Tier 1 (“purple status”), which is the most restrictive Tier of the blueprint.  CDPH’s November 28 analysis includes the following metrics for Marin County:  

On August 28, the state introduced its Blueprint for a Safer Economy, a four-tier framework by which counties are measured for loosening and tightening restrictions on social activities and business operations. Marin was initially placed in Tier 1, or purple status, and moved to Tier 2 on September 15 as its COVID-19 case figures improved. After achieving Tier 3 status on October 27, Marin moved back to Tier 2 on November 16 after seeing a rise in cases believed to be connected to Halloween festivities, private gatherings or other activities in opposition to current public health guidelines.
Further details about Marin’s Blueprint data can be found on our State Metrics for Marin County webpage.  
 
 
Sharing from our Friends and Partners at Cal OES

The alarming increase in the spread of COVID-19. As you may be aware, spikes in COVID-19 infections are being seen nationwide. California is no exception and we all need to do our part to stop the surge. We are seeing a troubling increase in the numbers of people testing positive for COVID-19; hospitalizations; individuals being treated in Intensive Care Units (ICUs); and deaths. Several efforts are underway to slow the spread including a new limited stay at home order for non-essential activities between 10:00pm to 5:00am in counties in the Widespread (purple) tier.

An Important Stakeholder Meeting: An Excellent Opportunity for Community to Participate
Upcoming AFN Leadership call. Based on the surge in COVID-19 cases, we will be holding an AFN Leadership call next Thursday (12/3) at 4:00pm. The call will focus on a briefing about the current/projected COVID-19 risk landscape and a briefing on vaccine prioritization/distribution plans. The meeting will take place over Zoom. The link is: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83418362671 or join by phone by dialing: +6699009128,,83418362671#
A Tidbit from Me: It is Marin CIL’s understanding that this call is open to the public and will include an opportunity to address questions from the public.  



Sharing from CDCAN: Happening NOW
SACRAMENTO, CA [BY MARTY OMOTO, CDCAN LAST UPDATED  11/30/2020 06:45 AM] - The critical issue of the State's emergency response and emergency alerts and evacuations will the focus today at 09:30 AM (Monday. November 30th), by the Joint Legislative Committee on Emergency Management, chaired by Assemblymember Luz Rivas,(Democrat - Arleta, 29th Assembly District) and vice chaired by State Senator Mike McGuire (Democrat - Healdsburg, 2nd State Senate District), in what will be the final legislative hearing of the 2019-2020 Legislative Session  Public comment will be taken at the end of the hearing.
    The issue of emergency response to disasters is critically important to all Californians, but especially urgent for people with disabilities (including people with developmental disabilities), people with mental health needs, people who are blind, people who are deaf, older Californians - all their families, and people who are workers who provide supports and services and all their families.
    The joint committee (meaning it has equal number of members from both the Assembly and State Senate) was established in 2011 and has primary jurisdiction (focus) that includes disaster preparedness, emergency management, and homeland security issues. The joint committee released an agenda and background information over the weekend. See below for links to information on the hearing and related documents. 
    The informational hearing today is the last hearing by the current California Legislature under the 2019-2020 Legislative Session that officially ends at November 30, 2020 at 11:59 PM. The newly elected and re-elected legislative members of the Assembly and State Senate will be sworn into office on December 7th, with the 2021-2022 Legislative Session starting up on January 3, 2021, Monday.   
    Also coming up today (Monday, November 30th) is a stakeholder online meeting by the California Department of Social Services (CDSS) regarding EVV Phase I (Electronic Visit Verification) focusing on people who are NON Live-In Providers in the In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) and Waiver Personal Care Services (WPCS) programs under the California Departments of Social Services and Health Care Services. A previous meeting focusing on people who are live-in providers of both services was held by the department on November 2nd. See email notice (dated November 24th) below that was sent by the California Department of Social Services to people who are live-in providers of IHSS and Waiver Personal Care Services (WPCS). A copy of the email notice was posted on the department's webpage (see below for links) in both English and Spanish.
    A stakeholder (online) meeting covering EVV (Electronic Visit Verification) Phase II is also scheduled next week on December 4th, Friday from 09:00 AM to 11:00 AM, focusing on providng updates on Phase II, hosted by the California Department of Health Care Services, with the Department of Developmental Services (DDS), Callifornia Department of Social Services (CDSS), California Department of Public Health (CDPH), the California Department of Aging (CDA) and the California Health and Human Services agency's Office of Systems Integration (OSI). See below for details and links to that stakeholder meeting
    CDCAN will be issuing a full report later today (November 30th) on a more detailed schedule of stakeholder meetings, and also legislative related events including newly scheduled stakeholder meetings of the Developmental Services (DS) Task force and a workgroup; Governor's Office of Emergency Services (OES) stakeholder update on COVID-19 and the state's vaccine plan.
     CDCAN NOTE: To receive the free CDCAN Reports, send email request to Marty Omoto (with "CDCAN Reports Subscribe" in the subject line) to: martyomoto@att.net

WHEN: NOVEMBER 30, 2020 - MONDAY ***TODAY***
TIME: 09:30 AM (Pacific Time)
WHO:  JOINT LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE ON EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
WHAT: INFORMATIONAL HEARING
SUBJECT: EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO DISASTERS - EMERGENCY ALERTS AND EVACUATIONS
WHERE: State Capitol - Room 4202
LIVESTREAM LINK: https://www.assembly.ca.gov/todaysevents
  Step 1: Scroll down to "Committee Hearings"
  Step 2: Scroll down to "Assembly Budget Subcommittee #2 on Education Finance"
  Step 3: Click on "Watch Hearing" for livestream video or "Listen" if you want audio only
  Note: to make public comments remotely please see below to make public comments by phone.
RECORDED VIDEO OF HEARING (usually posted for download within a day or so) - scroll down to hearing date
https://www.assembly.ca.gov/media-archive
PUBLIC COMMENT TAKEN?: Yes. Normally public comments are taken at the end of the hearing - the committee (or subcommittee) chair will announce when the committee will take up public comments. [As of November 30th, Monday, no further details on how to provide public comment using a call-in number or other ways online, have been posted on the committee's webpage. Listen to the chair on how the public can make comments during the hearing (see below for address to the committee to submit written comments)
PUBLIC COMMENTS - IN WRITING: According to the subcommittee the public is encouraged to provide written testimony before the hearing.  Please send your written testimony to: Philip.Horner@asm.ca.gov

WHEN: NOVEMBER 30, 2020 - MONDAY  ***TODAY***
TIME: 2:00 - 3:30 PM
AGENCY: CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES (CDSS)
WHAT: EVV (ELECTRONIC VISIT VERIFICATION) PHASE I STAKEHOLDER MEETING
SUBJECT: EVV PHASE I NON LIVE-IN PROVIDER UPDATE
PURPOSE: To provide more details about the live-in providers who the department announced on October 19, 2020, will be exempted from the EVV requirements sometime after January 1, 2021 - the exact date was not specififed.  [Note: this stakeholder meeting was originally scheduled for November 16th but was rescheduled for November 30th] 
TWO WAYS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS MEETING: 
   USING ZOOM (NO ADVANCE REGISTRATION NEEDED) Note: According to the department, after the presentation, participants are able to ask questions and provide comments on the telephone; or in Zoom, by raising their hand or by typing their questions into the chat feature in Zoom.
   ZOOM LINK: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87329751243
                              OR  
  USING CALL-IN LINE: To join the broadcast by telephone please call the dial in conference line number listed above, and when prompted enter the participant code
  CALL-IN NUMBER: 888-946-8416 
  CALL-IN PARTICIPANT CODE: 6889015

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal

Marin dominates racial segregation rankings in UC study
By LORENZO MOROTTI | lmorotti@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: November 29, 2020 at 3:21 p.m. | UPDATED: November 29, 2020 at 7:14 p.m.
Six out of the 10 most racially segregated municipalities in the Bay Area are in Marin County, according to a new report published by the University of California, Berkeley.
Prepared by the university’s Othering & Belonging Institute, the report calculated segregation in each of the Bay Area’s 101 municipalities using data from 2010 census tracts and categorizing demographics into five racial categories — Latinos, Whites, African-Americans, Asians and other.
“The project revealed that despite its reputation as a progressive and inclusive region, the Bay Area, like the rest of the country, remains highly segregated,” said lead researcher Stephen Menendian.
Since 1980, Marin has had a twofold increase in the level of segregation, according to the report.
The study focused on ranking municipalities by what it called “inter-municipal segregation” — or the “segregation of the residents from the larger region” — as opposed to “intra-municipal segregation,” or “the segregation of people between neighborhoods within the city.”
By that measure, the study ranked East Palo Alto first. Latino residents comprise 64.5% of the city’s population of 28,155.
Ross, with a population of 2,415, ranked second. White residents comprise 90.93% of the town.
Belvedere, with 2,068 residents, ranked a close third. White residents comprise 90.86% of the town.
In fourth place is Sausalito, with White residents comprising 87% of its population of 7,061. San Anselmo is fifth, with 86% of 12,336; Fairfax is seventh, with 85% of 7,441; and Mill Valley is ninth, with 85% of 13,903.
Towns and cities became racially homogenous through restrictive land-use policies like redlining and racial deed covenants, which barred non-White families from purchasing homes in certain areas. During World War II, Sausalito was a main shipyard for the war effort. Neighboring Marin City housed many Black shipyard workers, but they were barred from buying property elsewhere in the county after the war.
Marin City Matters activist Paul Austin’s grandparents were not able to spend their money earned in the shipyards to buy a home in now-affluent areas. He said Marin City’s property values would be much higher if Black families were given the same opportunity as White families.
“Even now you still have appraisers that won’t appraise homes in Marin City the same way they would in Sausalito,” Austin said. “It happened to us this year.”
He said the first appraiser low-balled the cost of his home in Marin City, so he fought to get it reappraised.
“But we had to do something White people would never think of or have to deal with — we got some of our White friends to act like the house was theirs,” he said. “We took down our family pictures or anything that might have drawn attention that house belongs to us. My White friend brought pictures of her White family, and it got appraised for $500,000 more than it did the first time.”
Towns and cities have taken steps in recent months to bring more social equity and racial diversity to Marin. Mill ValleyFairfaxSan AnselmoTiburon and Sausalito each formed a racial diversity and equity committee or passed a Black Lives Matter resolution.
Austin said he appreciates the conversation is starting, adding that more affordable housing and public transportation would be key to ending segregation.
“At this point we need to make sure Marin is welcoming to people of color,” he said. “We need for the systems to be changed so Black folks can get justice, because so far it’s not happened.”
Aside from the inordinate number of Marin municipalities, the top 10 included two similarly small cities, Portola Valley and Woodside, both in San Mateo County. Cupertino, in Santa Clara County, is No. 10, according to the report.
Source: Marin dominates racial segregation rankings in UC study

Marin expands mobile psychiatric crisis team program
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: November 28, 2020 at 11:17 a.m. | UPDATED: November 28, 2020 at 11:19 a.m.

A state grant has allowed Marin County to add a second mobile team to provide psychiatric crisis intervention, and officials might expand the program more if they can find the funding.
Advocates for “defunding” law enforcement agencies have lobbied county supervisors to take money from the Marin County Sheriff’s Office budget and use it to fund additional psychiatric intervention. In response, supervisors reduced the sheriff’s budget by $1.7 million in June. That money plus another $1 million have been reserved for unspecified racial equity initiatives.
The expansion of the mobile crisis team program came up at the supervisors’ meeting on Nov. 17 after the board eliminated 22 vacant county positions. The move is intended to cut a projected $16 million budget deficit in half for fiscal 2021-22.
“We’re going to be coming back to you on Dec. 15 with a update on our process around racial equity initiatives,” County Administrator Matthew Hymel told supervisors.
County mental health staffers met online with police chiefs on Nov. 19 to discuss mobile crisis teams.
Supervisor Damon Connolly elaborated on Hymel’s comments, describing in detail the expansion of the mobile crisis team program.
A one-year grant — $347,000 from the California Health Facilities Financing Authority — helped fund a second team of two mental health clinicians. It will also fund an expansion of the program’s operating hours — from 1 to 9 p.m. six days a week, to 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 9 p.m. Saturday.
“This is a needed expansion while more is needed and underway,” Connolly said. “Working with our partners, we are exploring the possibility of additional crisis teams, improved geographic coverage and expanded evening coverage.”
“With strong partners at the table, we continue to unpack the central questions of how do we best serve our community in response to a crisis,” Connolly said. “I think we have to stay flexible even on the possibility of looking at how to adjust the budget to meet these evolving needs.”

Full Article: Marin expands mobile psychiatric crisis team program



Sharing from the ARC of California
California Establishes Vaccine Advisory Committee to Ensure Equity in COVID-19 Vaccine Access

Last week the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) announced membership in the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee with broad representation from organizations throughout California to provide input into the distribution and allocation of the COVID-19 vaccine. The committee will help guide the state’s decision making and build equity into decisions about vaccine distribution and allocation. California’s planning process for the eventual distribution and administration of COVID-19 vaccines continues to be guided by three overarching principles. They include ensuring the COVID-19 vaccine meets safety requirements, ensuring the vaccine is distributed and administered equitably, at first to those with the highest risk of becoming infected and spreading COVID-19, and making transparency a top priority by bringing in community stakeholders from the beginning.
Equity in distribution of vaccines is particularly important to Californians with intellectual and developmental disabilities – who may be at higher risk of becoming infected or having serious illness due to COVID-19 – their families, and the essential workforce that provide critical supports and services.
The disability community has a long, complicated, and at times tragic past with vaccines and medical trials. The Arc of California will work with partner organizations to ensure the needs and concerns of the disability community are represented in discussions and ultimately decisions made related to vaccine distribution and priorities.
To learn more about the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee and California’s vaccination plan go to https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/OPA/Pages/NR20-311.aspx

Sharing from the National Council on Independent Living (NCIL)
 New Report: Challenging the Use of Algorithm-driven Decision-making in Benefits Determinations Affecting People with Disabilities
November 25, 2020 By theadvocacymonitor 
 
Last month, the Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) released a new report called Challenging the Use of Algorithm-driven Decision-making in Benefits Determinations Affecting People with Disabilities. The report focuses on algorithm-driven tools that reduce or terminate public benefits. It analyzes how people with disabilities and their lawyers have challenged these tools in court.
In the report, CDT cites several important court decisions when describing states’ constitutional requirements and their obligations under the Administrative Procedure Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Some cited cases require states to provide notice to recipients prior to algorithm-driven cuts to benefits, and to provide enough information for people to know how to contest algorithms’ results. Other cases require states to inform the public that they are planning to use the tools and to allow people to submit comments prior to implementation.
The report also describes institutionalization as a form of discrimination on the basis of disability, because it isolates disabled people from the community. Plaintiffs have shared that their care hours were cut almost in half. When algorithm-driven tools cause such deep cuts to supports and services, people with disabilities may have to go to institutions to receive necessary care that they should be able to get at home.
CDT’s recommendations to state governments, attorneys, and disabled self-advocates flow from a few key takeaways. First, when states implement an algorithm-driven tool to make benefits determinations, they are making a policy decision that affects people’s lives and evokes new legal and constitutional questions. Second, disabled people and other experts on algorithms know best the impact of algorithm-driven benefits determinations, so they should drive attorneys’ litigation and advocacy strategies. Finally, in addition to litigation, self-advocates have several avenues to call attention to unjust algorithmic tools, including social media, public government meetings, and the press.
NCIL: the advocacy monitor

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

Thankful for Each of You, Covid-19 Update, PG&E Going Paperless, Where to Get Tested for Covid-19


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on November 25, 2020

Good Morning Brothers and Sisters in Community,

I hope you are all doing well today. I want to wish you all a wonderful Thanksgiving. This has been such a transformative year for Marin CIL. Having to adapt to a remote service model, embrace technology, and reimagine the way we provide key safety-net services for our valued community members we serve every day. I want to take a moment to honor Marin CIL staff and the Board of Directors, Marin CIL Auxiliary Board our community partners, our valued donors, and most importantly our community members we have the privilege to serve every day. Have a wonderful Thanksgiving. Thankful for each of you today.
 


Marin County COVID-19 Status Update: November 24, 2020
The Marin County COVID-19 Status Update is published weekdays and as needed to share important news and resources related to the COVID-19 pandemic and to keep the local economy running. We remain here for you.
 
 
Blueprint Update: Marin Remains In Tier 2 (“Red”)
Today, California Department of Public Health (CDPH) provided its weekly update on the Blueprint for a Safer Economy, a statewide plan for reducing COVID-19 and keeping Californians healthy and safe.
CDPH confirmed Marin County’s placement in Tier 2 (red status) for a second straight week. Marin County is one of only eight California Counties in Tier 2, with five more in Tier 3 (orange status). All other counties are within the most restrictive Tier 1, (purple status).
CDPH’s November 24 assessment for Marin County includes:
While this week’s data technically falls within Tier 3 levels, we must (1) have been in the current tier for a minimum of three weeks; and (2) meet criteria for the next less restrictive tier for all measures for the prior two consecutive weeks in order to progress to the next tier.
CDPH’s assessment was updated on November 23 with a 4-day lag on metrics, so the data presented reflects metrics for November 11-18.  This past weekend, we saw an increase in daily cases (Dr. Willis addresses this in his video, below), which will likely keep us in Tier 2 or possibly push us into Tier 1 soon.
Where can I find more detail on Marin’s Blueprint data?
We’ve overhauled our State Metrics for Marin County webpage to provide greater clarity of Marin’s Blueprint data over time, and how our data relates to the state’s tier framework. The webpage is updated whenever the State provides a new Blueprint update (typically Tuesday afternoons).  
 
 
Message from Dr. Willis: “Wake Up Call”
Marin’s Public Health Officer, Dr. Matt Willis, shares and urgent message with Marin residents, shedding light on some of the recent COVID case-trends in Marin County. Dr. Willis also discusses how our collective choices in celebrating the holidays safely can potentially stop or reduce a further surge in cases.
View on YouTube
 
 
Spread the word: Special webinar for Youth Sports Organizers
Our local contact tracers are noticing a disturbing, growing trend: transmission of COVID-19 through youth sports. The main reason for this ranges from teams not wearing masks or following youth sports guidance, to teams traveling to areas outside of Marin County and bringing infections back with them.
The Marin Recovers Industry Advisors and Marin Public Health will hold a special webinar specifically for youth sports organizations, clubs or providers to discuss ways to reduce COVID-19 infections among youth athletes and supporters.  Please forward this information to any sports providers, coaches or trainers you may know so we can stop this trend.
Webinar Date:  Monday, November 30 at 2:00pm
How to participate: 
  • Online: Zoom.us
  • Phone: (669) 900-6833, Meeting ID: 919 7221 2923, Passcode: 124457
 


 


You have questions, we have answers!
The PM Morning Report has received questions related to Covid-19 testing. Here is a helpful link from Marin Health and Human Services Covid-19 website: Covid-19 Testing Frequently Asked Questions

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin’s coronavirus spike continues as California shatters daily case record
By MATTHEW PERA | mpera@marinij.com and EVAN WEBECK |
PUBLISHED: November 24, 2020 at 5:50 p.m. | UPDATED: November 24, 2020 at 6:23 p.m.
Coronavirus infections in Marin are rising at a rate that threatens to rival the record-setting summer surge, which could thrust the county back into the state’s most restrictive tier for reopening as early as next week, the county’s public health officer said Tuesday.
“My concern is that if this trend goes unabated, we would start seeing surges into our hospitals in December, which is around the same time we start to see flu cases coming in,” said Public Health Officer Dr. Matt Willis.
The county recorded an average of about 10 new COVID-19 cases per day throughout October and about 20 new daily cases at the beginning of this month, Willis said. But over the past several days, the average number of new infections has jumped to 30 or more, representing a steep increase that could foreshadow a more troubling surge, he said.
“If the current rate of new infections continues, we would be in the purple tier as early as next Monday,” Willis said, referring to the highest of the four tiers in California’s economic reopening blueprint.
Marin on Tuesday remained in the red tier, which is one step below purple, even as California officials moved more counties to tighter restrictions on business and activities. The move came as the state set new records of daily infections amid a relentless autumn surge that has left health officials pleading with people to avoid Thanksgiving gatherings outside their households this week.
Health departments around the state reported 20,554 new coronavirus cases Monday, shattering the previous single-day record of 16,521 that followed the July 4 weekend. That brought the state’s daily average of new cases to a record 12,442 over the past week, doubling in the span of 12 days.
Source: Marin’s coronavirus spike continues as California shatters daily case record

A Tidbit from Me: As I mentioned in previous PM reports Marin CIL has played a key role in supporting people with disabilities, older adults, and others with Access and Functional Needs (AFN) during the Covid-19 pandemic. One of the many ways that we have been supporting this effort is through our role supporting the work of the Marin County Emergency Operations Center (EOC). Marin CIL staff on an as needed basis, together with County employees, are part of the EOC AFN team. This team is specifically trained to support people with disabilities, older adults, and others with Access and Functional Needs before, during, and after a disaster. Marin CIL is covering the AFN position at the Marin EOC through the holiday weekend.

What is the role of an Emergency Operations Center you ask?

Great question: The Marin County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) functions as the communication and coordination center for both the County and  Operational Area emergency response organization and disaster preparedness, providing a central point for coordinating operational, administrative, and support needs of the county and Operational Area Members.  It also assists in coordination and communication between the state Office of Emergency Services during county-wide and state-wide emergency response and recovery operations.

If you would like more information about how you can support Marin CIL’s Emergency Preparedness and Response activities or if you are a person with a disability or older adult and you would like information about disaster preparedness please reach out to us!
 
PG & E has made some important changes to your account. 
Starting this month, your billing preference has been changed to paperless. This month only, you will receive both a paper bill in the mail and an electronic copy of your bill via email. Going forward, your future monthly bills will automatically switch to a paperless e-bill that you can easily view, download and print at your convenience.

PG & E understands this option may not work for all our customers. If you choose to opt out of paperless billing to continue receiving a paper bill, just click here. You should see a preformatted email. Simply click 'send,' and we will unenroll you from paperless.

If you choose to continue receiving paper bills, you will receive a confirmation email in approximately five to seven business days. Remember, you can modify your billing preference at any time or view your PG&E bill by visiting pge.com.

PG&E hopes you'll enjoy this easy and environmentally-friendly option.

Thank you

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.



 

Preparing for the Distribution of the Covid-19 Vaccine in Marin, GGT Drivers Facing Layoffs, & more


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on November 24, 2020

Good Morning Brothers and Sisters in Community,
I hope you are all doing well this morning. This morning started early for me. I already feel like it’s going to be a multiple coffee day for me. Lot’s to do on my calendar today. Wishing you all a wonderful day! Raising my coffee cup to you this morning. There’s a lot happening in our world so here we go with your PM Morning Report.

County of Marin Update: 
State Creates Advisory Committee to Inform COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution
Today, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) announced a new advisory committee with broad representation from organizations throughout California to provide input into the distribution and allocation of the COVID-19 vaccine. The Community Vaccine Advisory Committee will be chaired by California Surgeon General Dr. Nadine Burke Harris and will provide input and feedback for the ongoing planning and engagement efforts.
California's planning process for the eventual distribution and administration of COVID-19 vaccines is guided by three overarching principles: (1) ensuring the COVID-19 vaccine meets safety requirements; (2) ensuring the vaccine is distributed and administered equitably, at first to those with the highest risk of becoming infected and spreading COVID-19; and (3) making transparency a top priority by bringing in community stakeholders from the beginning. 
Related Resources:

Sharing from CalABLE:
Selecting Investment Options for Your CalABLE Account
Date: Thursday, December 10, 2020
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM (PT)
CalABLE Account holders learn about the different Investment and Savings Options.
What is the FDIC–Insured savings option
What are target risk Investments
How to maximize your account contributions before December 31, 2020
Guest Speaker: Glenn Friedman, CFA, Manager of Asset Allocation, TIAA-CREF Tuition Financing, Inc.
This webinar is for the seasoned account holder and will not include the basics of the CalABLE Program. 
If you would like to join us via computer and submit questions during the webinar, please Register to receive a confirmation email and login information.
There is an audio only option available as well. Please note that in using the audio only option, you will not be able to submit questions during the broadcast. To join via telephone:
Call +1 (669) 900-6833
Enter Webinar ID: 950 7706 3237
For those who are unable to make the live broadcast, a replay of the webinar will be made available on CalABLE's YouTube channel.
If you have not had a chance to attend a presentation on the fundamentals of the CalABLE program, we recommend that you listen to the replay of our CalABLE 101 webinar available on YouTube at  https://youtu.be/kmZvXudyV1w. This replay can help answer some of the questions you may already have and provides a good foundation. 
If you have any questions, please contact us at calable@treasurer.ca.gov

Sharing from the National Low-Income Housing Coalition
Bill to Increase Amount of FEMA Funding for COVID-19 and 2020 Disasters Passes House
Nov 23, 2020
The FEMA Assistance Relief Act of 2020 (H.R. 8266), sponsored by House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Peter DeFazio (D-OR), was passed unanimously by the House of Representatives on November 17. The bill would direct FEMA to increase funding for state, local, tribal, and territorial governments, as well as some nonprofits, through its Public Assistance (PA) Program by significantly reducing the cost-share requirements of governments and nonprofits. NLIHC’s Disaster Housing Recovery Coalition (DHRC) is urging Congress to quickly enact this bill.
The PA program reimburses governments and some nonprofits for eligible “emergency protective measures,” including emergency sheltering, first responder expenses, and medical triage. The program is currently active in areas impacted by recent disasters, such as the Gulf Coast, California, and Oregon, as well as for COVID-19-related work nationwide. The program typically reimburses 75% of the overall cost of an eligible activity, leaving governments and nonprofits to cover the remaining 25%. The bill would raise the reimbursement level to 90% for all 2020 disasters and 100% for COVID-19 related costs. The legislation would also clarify that activities such as sheltering, rehousing, and food distribution would be eligible for reimbursement under the program.
The FEMA PA Program has been utilized by state, local, and non-profit organizations to move individuals experiencing homelessness that have been exposed to COVID-19 or are medically at-risk into hotel rooms and other non-congregate shelters to quarantine. Given heavy usage and strain on the current shelter system, the program has allowed many areas experiencing COVID-19 spikes to slow the spread of the disease among individuals experiencing homelessness. However, many state and local budgets have been substantially impacted by the pandemic, and some areas of the country have not been able to utilize this tool, as elected officials and policy makers were unable to pay 25% of the cost required to receive FEMA reimbursement. If passed by the Senate, this bill would allow more state and local governments to implement the program and ensure that hotel rooms can be used to slow the spread of COVID within their shelter system. The Senate version of the bill (S. 4627) is sponsored by Senator Jeff Merkley (D-OR) and will be considered by the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee.
Read the text of the FEMA Assistance Relief Act at: https://bit.ly/3nxXEHV
Read NLIHC’s best practices document on FEMA and non-congregate sheltering at: https://bit.ly/3lErmKJ

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Bay Area labor groups seek $100M to prevent transit layoffs
By WILL HOUSTON | whouston@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: November 23, 2020 at 4:48 p.m. | UPDATED: November 23, 2020 at 4:48 p.m.

 In relevant part..
A coalition of labor groups, unions and supporters are urging the Bay Area’s top transportation planning agency to divert at least $100 million to prevent hundreds of transit workers from being laid off as federal stimulus dollars dry up.
The Metropolitan Transportation Commission, which manages transit and transportation funding for the nine-county Bay Area, is set to meet on Dec. 16 to discuss the proposal. The meeting comes as many transit agencies in the region are set to run out of the $1.3 billion in federal stimulus funding that allowed them to keep their employees on the payroll despite dramatic drops in ridership, bridge tolls and tax revenue since March from the coronavirus pandemic.
Nearly 60 labor unions and supporters have urged the commission in a letter to prevent the layoffs and service reductions by tapping into a portion of its funding that is typically used for things such as buying new buses or trains or repairing or replacing transit lines, roads and vehicles.
“We’re not talking about not doing those capital projects, we’re talking about making sure there is a transit system around to serve us when those capital projects are done in due course,” Public Advocates Inc. managing attorney Richard Marcantonio told the commission last week.

Meanwhile, Golden Gate bus and ferry operators facing layoffs in about five weeks are wondering what they’ll do should they lose their jobs. District staff and unions are still able to meet to discuss alternatives to layoffs, though there is nothing to report from those talks, according to district spokesman Paolo Cosulich-Schwartz.
Shane Weinstein, president of the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1575, which represents the district’s 250 bus operators, said many of the 88 bus drivers facing layoffs are afraid of what might happen next and are wondering how long they’ll have their medical benefits. Laid-off employees would be able to retain health care coverage until June 1 under the district’s plan.
After months of discussing four options with the district to avoid layoffs, including furloughs and dipping into the district’s reserves, Weinstein said the district presented the union with an either-or option of temporarily raising bridge tolls to prevent layoffs or cutting staff in early November. Weinstein said the district’s bridge tolls option was made as a way to turn the public against them in favor of layoffs.
For full article: Bay Area labor groups seek $100M to prevent transit layoffs
A Tidbit from Me: People with disabilities historically have been more dependent on public transit than people without disabilities. In San Francisco 36.6% of people with disabilities utilize public transit vs 33.5% of non-disabled people. This is because of a variety of factors. People with disabilities do drive. However, there is a high percentage of people with disabilities who may not be able to drive themselves or may not have access to an accessible vehicle. Another factor is even if they own an accessible vehicle they often have to pay someone to drive for them and they may not have the financial resources to do so. Another affect of reducing public transportation routes is the impact on Paratransit services. ADA complementary paratransit service provides origin-to-destination service and must be available where fixed-route service exists. If fixed route service hours are reduced ADA paratransit service hours may be reduced. Marin CIL has a seat on the Golden Gate Bridge Highway and Transportation Districts Advisory Committee on Accessibility. I should mention I am currently the Vice-Chair of the committee. We all understand that many transit agencies are facing severe budget cuts and low ridership because of Covid-19; it is important that transit providers remember the important role they provide in supporting people with disabilities’ ability to travel from place to place in order to go to work and move about their communities.

Sharing from the Marin VOAD:
The fund is aimed at helping small businesses across California and nearly all industries, particularly those located in economically disadvantaged and historically underserved areas.
 To qualify, small businesses must have employed 50 or fewer full-time equivalent (FTE) employees prior to March 2020 and have realized gross revenues of less than $2.5 million in 2019, and must have suffered a direct economic hardship as a result of COVID-19.
 Click here for the pre-application page.
After you have completed and submitted the online pre-application and are deemed eligible, you will be matched with a participating community lender. You will receive an email or call from them shortly so that you can begin the full loan application process.
 Here is info on the loan terms
 Here is a FAQ page
 We are ready to support you in this process and make sure you have all the paperwork you need. If you need any assistance (English, Spanish and French), please reach out to us at 415-482-1819 or sign up HERE
Sponsors: County of Marin, City of San Rafael, City of Novato, Mill Valley, BioMarin, Umpqua Bank, California Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development, Presidio Bank, Barowsky School of Business, Wells Fargo.

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

Marin Covid-19 Update, California Appeals Court Raises Concerns in Marin Case, and More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on November 23, 2020

Good Morning my Brothers and Sisters in Community,
I hope each of you is doing well on this rather cool Monday morning. This weekend the Sandman came knocking….I had been working my tires to the rim lately. This past week there were many projects on deadline and a few evening meetings. For me it’s been high-speed and low drag. I decided to rest a little more and binge watch various retro TV shows from the 1970’s. I feel rested today. Here you go with the PM Morning Report. Have a fabulous day. Take care of yourself and each other.

County of Marin Update:
Marin Holding Steady in Red Tier 2 
Marin County is holding steady in red tier 2 as Thanksgiving week approaches.   
 
"We will only move into purple if the state requires it based on our COVID-19 case numbers,” said Public Health Officer Dr. Matt Willis. “We’re watching the numbers very closely each day and so far are encouraged to see that we are currently stable in the red tier. Looking at what’s happening elsewhere, we are of course concerned that the regional surge will reach Marin. It’s prudent for us to anticipate an eventual move to purple, while we do all we can to hang onto the gains we’ve achieved. No county is an island." 
 
If case rates increase significantly in Marin, the county would move in the purple tier and the state’s curfew, announced yesterday and effective November 21 through December 21, would become mandatory. 
 
Public Health Officials Remind Residents to Get Flu Shots Before the Holidays 
Health officials from across the Bay Area are asking the public to fight the flu by getting the annual vaccination for influenza before the holidays. Each winter, people sick with flu crowd hospitals and urgent care clinics -- resources that may already be strained due to COVID-19. Early and timely flu shots can prevent a disease that hospitalizes 200,000 Americans every year. 
 
To keep yourself and your family out of the hospital, doctors recommend an annual flu shot for everyone age 6 months or older. The flu shot is a safe, effective way to reduce your chance of missing work or ending up in the hospital due to severe flu. Symptoms of the flu can be similar to early symptoms of COVID-19, meaning that this year, people with flu symptoms may require a COVID-19 test and may need to stay home from work and isolate away from their families while awaiting results. 
 
For those with medical insurance, flu shots are free as a preventive service at doctor’s offices and most retail pharmacies. Those without health insurance can obtain free or low-cost flu shots through local community clinics. Find more locations near you that offer flu vaccine using the Vaccine Finder
  
For more information about flu, visit flu.marinhhs.org.  
 
Nearly All Marin Ballots Counted from Election
Registrar plans to certify local results by December 2
San Rafael, CA – The Marin County Elections Department has counted all ballots from the November 3 General Election with a few exceptions. More than 158,000 ballots have been tabulated resulting in a turnout of just over 90%, second only to the turnout in the November 2008 General Election that was nearly 91%.
Outstanding ballots include those that were postmarked by November 3 and will arrive in the mail by the 5 p.m. November 20 deadline, and those waiting for voters to fix a signature problem – either missing signature or mismatched signature. Voters have until 5 p.m. Monday, November 30, to return their signature verification letter.
Registrar of Voters Lynda Roberts started the mandatory manual tally of ballots on November 17 following California Elections Code section 15360. The manual tally is ongoing and will be completed prior to Thanksgiving. Roberts plans to officially certify the election by December 2.
A complete description of the post-election canvass, including the manual tally process, is found at www.marinvotes.org.
More information about the election can be found on the County’s Newsroom. Follow the Elections Department on Facebook.
You have subscribed to News Releases & Advisories for Marin County. This information has recently been updated.
Visit the Newsroom to view all County news releases.







Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
A Tidbit from Me: One of the articles that caught my attention this morning is written by my friend  GARY KLIEN | gklien@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal, who I have known for almost 25 years. In the article, a California Appeals Court took the unusual step of indicting the Marin legal system for not taking in to account a defendant’s mental health conditions as part of a plea agreement and sentencing. For background, in October 2018, a San Rafael man was charged with threatening to kill his neighbors. He pleaded guilty just six weeks later without mounting a defense, despite the prospect of prison time. According to the article Mr. O’Hearn had a documented history of various mental health related conditions including schizophrenia and had been hospitalized on multiple occasions. Mr. O’Hearn’s attorney is believed to only have met with him twice prior to his taking the guilty plea. Mr. O’Hearn, in taking the guilty plea, avoided prison time for the felony conviction. However, pleading guilty to a felony threats charge counted as a “strike” toward a potential three-strikes under California law. This case was heard by a three judge panel and the opinion published by Justice Kline.
Appellate ruling scolds Marin court over threats conviction
PUBLISHED: November 22, 2020 at 11:28 a.m. | UPDATED: November 22, 2020 at 12:20 p.m.
The appeals court decision states in relevant part…
“Pretrial diversion of mentally ill offenders will not always be appropriate,” Justice J. Anthony Kline wrote for a three-judge panel, “but the plight of our prisons, the needs of mentally ill prisoners, and the expectations of our Legislature demand that it receive more serious consideration by defense counsel, prosecutors, probation departments, and sentencing courts than it did in this case.”
“No reasonable lawyer could have acted as Selby did in the circumstances of this case,” Justice Kline wrote.
Further, in an unusual “postscript” to the opinion, Kline said the system set O’Hearn up for failure.
“So far as the record shows, neither the probation department, the district attorney, nor the court, questioned the wisdom and efficacy of a sentence including probation conditions O’Hearn was almost certain to violate, which would likely result in his imprisonment — a result sought to be avoided by the United States Supreme Court and the California Legislature,” wrote Kline.
The ruling is unusual in that the court chose to certify it as a “published” opinion, meaning it can be cited in other cases. That option is generally used for rulings that break some legal ground, but the rules of court also allow it for opinions on a “legal issue of continuing public interest.”

This case once again brings up the concern raised by Disability Rights organizations and behavioral health advocacy organizations, including the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)
“In a mental health crisis, people are more likely to encounter police than get medical help. As a result, 2 million people with mental illness are booked into jails each year. Nearly 15% of men and 30% of women booked into jails have a serious mental health condition.” - NAMI- Jailing People with Mental Illness
To read the entire article: Appellate ruling scolds Marin court over threats conviction

Sharing from Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund is Hosting an Important Webinar:
Reasonable Accommodations in California Housing and COVID-19
When: Tuesday, December 1, 11:30 – 12:30 p.m.
The pandemic has highlighted how important disability rights protections are including the right of disabled tenants and shelter residents to receive reasonable accommodations to maintain housing stability. This training will cover the definition of disability in light of COVID-19, reasonable accommodations that may be helpful to prevent evictions during this time, and additional California renter protections.
Presenters:
Sydney Pickern, Staff Attorney
Linda Kilb, esq., Director, California Legal Services Trust Fund Support Center Program
The webcast will take place on Tuesday, December 1, 11:30 a.m. –12:30 p.m
REGISTER HERE:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_sl5bDL1PQDWRYki5qPFgjA 
Real-time captioning will be available during this webcast. The registration confirmation process includes reasonable accommodations requests.

Summer 2021 Legal Internships
The Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund (“DREDF”), located in Berkeley, California, offers summer internships for current law students. The internships generally involve a 40-hour per week commitment for at least 5 weeks, and preferably 8 to 10 weeks.
TO APPLY:
Please submit the following materials, preferably in a single PDF file, to info@dredf.org with “ATTN: Summer 2021 Legal Internships [YOUR LAST NAME]” in the subject line:

  • Cover Letter
  • Resume
  • Writing Sample
  • References
Applications will be considered on a rolling basis. Interested students should apply as early as possible.
DREDF values diversity, and we strongly encourage and welcome people of color, people with disabilities, parents of children with disabilities, LGBTQI people, and people with diverse life experiences and backgrounds to apply. DREDF is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
For more information: Summer 2021 Legal Internships


Sharing from CDCAN: Calling Self-Advocates and Family Members DDS Needs Your Input!
DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES (DDS) RELEASES ON-LINE SURVEY - ASKS THAT INDIVIDUALS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES (SELF ADVOCATES) AND FAMILIES COMPLETE SURVEY TO HELP STATE UNDERTAND COVID-19'S IMPACT TO SERVICES & THEIR COMMUNITY
SACRAMENTO, CA [BY MARTY OMOTO, CDCAN LAST UPDATED  11/21/2020 01:50 AM] - As previously reported by CDCAN earlier this week, the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) released a statewide online survey, asking that individuals with developmental disabilities (referred to as "self-advocates") and families complete the brief survey that will help the State better understand the impact of COVID-19 on services and the impact to their communities (see below for link to the survey and instructions). 
    This survey, according to the department, will be available online through December 18, 2020. 
    The department indicated that it would post the results of the survey on the department's website, likely several weeks after the survey period closes (December 18th).
     Persons having any questions about the survey can send an email to the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) at: FamilyInput@dds.ca.gov
    The brief 15 question survey will help the department understand what is working, what is not and is important to people with developmental disabilities (self-advocates) and families who completed the survey. 
    The survey is available in 10 different languages (see below for links to those different languages). 
        CDCAN NOTE: To receive the free CDCAN Reports, send email request to Marty Omoto (with "CDCAN Reports Subscribe" in the subject line) to: martyomoto@att.net

If you use Assistive Technology the Assistive Technology Advisory Council wants You!
DOR is recruiting new ATAC Members!
Dear Partners and Community Members,
The Department of Rehabilitation is seeking applications and nominations for its Assistive Technology Advisory Council (ATAC). Members of the ATAC provide an important voice regarding issues related to access and acquisition of assistive technology, in addition to recommending ways to improve assistive technology services in California.
The ATAC consists of a diverse membership interested in, and representative of, Californians who are persons with disabilities who use assistive technology, or are family members of persons with disabilities who use assistive technology.
There are multiple ATAC consumer vacancies. This recruitment strives to select individuals representing the following populations of people who utilize assistive technology:
  • Blind and visually impaired
  • Deaf and hard of hearing
  • Developmental disabilities
  • Physical disabilities
  • Other disabilities
  • Representative of people aged 60 and older
  • Representative of people aged 14 to 23
  • Representative of a person with a disability, such as a family member or guardian of a person with a disability, who uses assistive technology
If interested, please see the attached recruitment notice and application.
Source: DOR is Recruiting New ATAC Members

Sharing from the California Department of Aging: A Webinar Featuring Two Movers and Shakers in Independent Living
Ensuring Equity in Aging webinar, Culturally Responsive Policy and Program Development with and for People with Disabilities, on December 2nd, from 10-11 a.m. This webinar will feature Ana Acton of FREED Center for Independent Living and Christina Mills of the California Foundation for Independent Living Centers for a discussion on how we can shape policy and provide program delivery to ensure equity in aging with and for people with disabilities and to fight ableism. Time will be reserved for Q&A.
 
Register in advance for the December 2nd Ensuring Equity in Aging Webinar:
https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_5J6S5XOzRgmh7DR9xqHm-Q
Source: California for All Ages

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Batphones. a Task Force and Some Recommendations; Covid 19 Let's Stop the Spread


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on November 20, 2020

Good Afternoon, my brothers and sisters in community, HAPPY FRIDAY! I hope you are all doing well today. It has been a very busy week for me, with much to do, which caused a pause in yesterday’s  PM morning report. My Batphone was ringing off the hook! These days the Batcave is at Mendoza Manor, where we specialize in Universal Design. Instead of a pole leading to the Batcave, we have a nice gentle sloping ramp. The Batmobile has a ramp too!  
Here is my effort to get you all caught up! Enjoy your weekend!
County of Marin Update

Preparedness Counts. Ready for Holiday Celebrations?
The first fall rains in Marin County usually mark the end of fire season and the beginning of the holidays. While the tail end of 2020’s devastating fire season is most welcome, many are apprehensive about how the coming holiday celebrations will look.
When planning your holiday celebrations, think “safety first.” To protect loved ones, our community, and health care workers, keep these tips in mind:

  • Keep it Private gatherings are permitted up to three households. The smaller the gathering, the safer it is for everyone – especially those more vulnerable to severe disease from COVID-19.
  • Keep it SHORT. The longer the duration, the higher the risk of transmission. Gatherings should be two hours or less.
  • Keep it Are you “winter ready”? Temperatures are dropping. Is it time to add another layer (literally) of protection against the cold? When visiting with others outdoors, it’s especially important to keep your head, feet, and hands warm.
  • Keep it CLEAN. Remember to wash your hands frequently for at least 20 seconds with soap and water, or with hand sanitizer when washing is not an option, especially after coming into contact with frequently touched surfaces.
  • Keep it SAFE. The best way to protect yourself and those you care about this holiday season is to practice safe social distancing. Remember to stay at least 6 feet apart and wear a face covering whenever not actively eating or drinking.
Related Resources:
Celebrate Safely
State guidance for Private Gatherings

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Marin County cuts 22 positions over $16M deficit
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: November 19, 2020 at 2:04 p.m. | UPDATED: November 20, 2020 at 7:10 a.m.
Marin County supervisors have approved cutting 22 vacant positions in response to a projected budget deficit of $16 million in fiscal year 2021-22.
The county is projecting growing deficits over the next five years to more than $36 million by fiscal 2025-26 unless steps are taken, due chiefly to fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic.
“These options include no layoffs,” County Administrator Matthew Hymel told supervisors. “We’re really looking for minimal impacts for our residents, especially those in our underserved communities who are bearing the burdens of the COVID-19 emergency.”
The Board of Supervisors approved the cuts on Tuesday. The move will save nearly $5.7 million. Supervisors also approved budget adjustments that boosted revenue by nearly $2.4 million.
Source: Marin County cuts 22 positions over $16M deficit
A Tidbit from Me: The Marin County Board of Supervisors budget also funds many programs that are important to people with disabilities, older adults, and other traditionally underserved communities. Traditionally, the budget hearings happen in the Spring and the final budget is adopted in late June. If you have any questions about the budget process of want more information or to get involved in the County’s budget adoption process please feel free to reach out to Marin CIL.


Gov. Newsom announces ‘limited’ COVID curfew for more than 90% of Californians
Nighttime gatherings prohibited starting Saturday
By MARISA KENDALLEVAN WEBECK and ROBERT SALONGA |
PUBLISHED: November 19, 2020 at 2:24 p.m. 
Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday announced a limited curfew designed to curtail the nighttime movements of more than 90% of Californians, the state’s latest attempt to slow a rapid surge of COVID-19 cases.
The new rule largely mirrors the March stay-at-home order that was the nation’s first to shut down much of the economy, except for one major detail: It’s only applicable at night. Starting Saturday, the vast majority of Californians are asked to avoid gathering with other households from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. Restaurants must close at 10, with the exception of takeout and delivery. But grocery stores and other essential businesses can remain open, and Californians can pick up a carton of milk or walk the dog late at night with others in their households without violating the order.
The order, issued just ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday and as California reported more infections in the past week than at any other time, will last until at least Dec. 21. It applies to counties in the purple “widespread risk” tier — 41 of the state’s 58 counties. That includes all of the Bay Area, except San Francisco, San Mateo and Marin counties.
“The virus is spreading at a pace we haven’t seen since the start of this pandemic and the next several days and weeks will be critical to stop the surge. We are sounding the alarm,” Newsom wrote in a news release. “It is crucial that we act to decrease transmission and slow hospitalizations before the death count surges. We’ve done it before and we must do it again.”
In addition to rising cases, hospitalizations and deaths are increasing, too. On Wednesday, county health departments around California combined to report 11,646 new cases and 107 new deaths, according to data compiled by this news organization — the highest single-day death toll since Oct. 21. The state was on track to surpass 12,500 cases Thursday, just the fourth time at least 10,000 cases have been recorded on four consecutive days.
Source: Gov. Newsom announces ‘limited’ COVID curfew for more than 90% of Californians
A Tidbit From Me:
I know I have talked about this before, however I don’t think it can be overstated. It is important for all of us to do everything we can to stop the spread as a community. Stay home and practice social distancing. This will be especially hard during Thanksgiving. Break out your laptops, as this is a great time for a video chat. While we may not be able to be physically together with the ones we love, having a video chat or talking on the phone is a great way to be together. You can even do it in your pajamas.
Sharing from CDCAN
NEW DIRECTIVE - DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES ISSUES NEW DIRECTIVE WAIVING STATE LAW THAT REQUIRES SELF DETERMINATION PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS TO PAY FOR THE COST OF THEIR FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES (FMS)

SACRAMENTO, CA [BY MARTY OMOTO, CDCAN LAST UPDATED  11/19/2020 07:00 PM] - The Department of Developmental Services (DDS), released today (November 19th) a new directive under the Governor's state of emergency, that waives the requirement under the Self Determination Program (SDP) that the cost of the financial management service (FMS) is paid by the participant from his or her individual budget, that is currently required under state law.  This waiver is effective October 1, 2020.
    The department indicated in the directive that the temporary waiver of the requirement for the participant to pay for the cost of their Financial Management Service (FMS), is necessary to allow participants of the Self-Determination Program to "repurpose" (meaning re-direct or use for another purpose) the waived fees for different and/or additional Self Determination Program services during the COVID-19 State of Emergency.
    WHAT THIS MEANS: This directive means that people who are participating in the Self Determination Program (different from the "Participant Directed Services"), effective October 1, 2020, will not be required to pay out of their Self Determination Program budget the cost of their Financial Management Service (FMS) and instead can re-use that money for some other service under the program. The savings for individuals will vary depending on the cost of their Financial Management Service. 
    The waiver of the requirement, under the directive issued today expires in 30 days, but can be extended by the department (as it has done for all the existing directives issued under the Governor's State of Emergency - the exception being the directive on Alternative Non-Residential Services, which has no expiration date). 
    See below for text of the directive and also link to the actual directive.
   CDCAN NOTE: To receive the free CDCAN Reports, send email request to Marty Omoto (with "CDCAN Reports Subscribe" in the subject line) to: martyomoto@att.net

Governor's March 12th Executive Order Gave Authority to DDS Director To Issue Directives Waiving Any Provision or Requirement of Lanterman Act or Early Intervention Act 
    As previously reported by CDCAN during the State of Emergency, Governor Gavin Newsom's March 12, 2020 executive order authorized the director of the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) to issue directives or guidance waiving any provision or requirement of the landmark state law known as the "Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act" and also the California Early Intervention Services Act due to COVID-19, with an expiration date of 30 days - with 30 day extensions as needed.  That is why the department is required to issue directives waiving an existing state law with expiration dates of 30 days, that can be extended (and have been for at least six previously issued directives). 
    The directive issued August 31, 2020 that authorized "Alternative Non-residential Services" as an option to providing other types of services to people who currently are not allowed (under current state public health directive on gatherings) to attend site-based programs, however does NOT have an expiration date. That directive was issued under a different executive order by the Governor (Executive Order N-75-20 issued on August 24, 2020, that suspended Title 17, California Code of Regulations section 54326(a)(11). 
    Some directives issued by the Department of Developmental Services have no expiration date either because the directive was providing only information or does not change state law, and remains in effect unless rescinded by the Department of Developmental Services. 
Self Determination Program: The Self-Determination Program provides consumers and their families with more freedom, control, and responsibility in choosing services and supports to help them meet objectives in their Individual Program Plan. To learn more:  Department of Developmental Service: Self Determination Program
If you need even more information about Reginal Center services and Self Determination please reach out to Marin CIL. You have questions: We have answers

Sharing from  our ggod friends and valued community partner, Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California
Fair Housing in Times of COVID-19 Panel

Wednesday, December 9, 2020
12:00 to 1:30 pm
 
​Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California will present the upcoming panel: “Fair Housing in Times of COVID-19,” on Wednesday, December 9, 12:00 to 1:30 pm via Zoom. The panel will address COVID-19 trends and impacts affecting protected classes, and strategies and recovery efforts underway at the local and state levels. Panelists will discuss how the pandemic is disproportionally affecting vulnerable communities, including ethnic and racial minorities, women, victims of domestic violence and sexual harassment, and people with disabilities.  
 
The forum is appropriate for housing advocates, staff of service organizations, elected officials, city and county staff, community leaders, and tenants.
 
Panelists include Omar Carrera, Chief Executive Officer, Canal Alliance; Liz Darby, Social Equity Program and Policy Coordinator, County of Marin; Felicity Gasser, HCD Specialist II, Federal Programs, California Department of Housing & Community Development; Julia Howard-Gibbon, Supervising Attorney, Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California; Moderator: Caroline Peattie, Executive Director, Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California
 
Click here to register
A Zoom link will be emailed prior to the event
 
For more information or special needs, please contact Adriana Ames at adriana@fairhousingnorcal.org.
 
This program is based on work supported by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) under FHIP EOI Grant.FEO2I00219. Any opinion, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of HUD.
For more Information: Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California
A Tidbit from Me:
One of MarinCIL’s core programs is to assist community members to find accessible, affordable housing.  We also provide housing retention and advocacy services. If you are struggling with housing issues, contact MarinCIL.  We are here to help.

Sharing from the Governor’s Task Force on Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention, Preparedness and the Path Forward California’s first-ever Alzheimer’s Task Force Delivers Recommendations
Breaking News! The Task Force on Alzheimer’s Prevention, Preparedness and the
Path Forward, chaired by former California First Lady Maria Shriver, presented its set of ten
recommendations to Gov. Gavin Newsom today addressing ways California can prevent and
prepare for the rise in the number of cases of Alzheimer’s Disease and forge a bold path forward
for an aging state and its families.
The Task Force’s recommendations are to:
1. Appoint a senior advisor on Alzheimer’s to coordinate the dozens of agencies and
departments with jurisdiction over aging, Alzheimer’s and caregiving.
2. Keep California at the forefront of cutting-edge research by leveraging its world-
renowned research institutions and diverse investigators.
3. Create an Alzheimer’s Disease public awareness campaign that educates the public
about different neurodegenerative diseases, their prevention, symptoms, diagnosis and
how treatments are essential.
4. Build a California Cares (digital portal) to function as a one-stop-shop for all
information and services related to screening and diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease as
well as the planning and coordination of care.
5. Establish a California voluntary savings accounts for long-term care to make non-
clinical costs incurred by individuals living with Alzheimer’s more affordable.
6. Invest in career incentives for the Alzheimer's healthcare workforce to encourage
workers to pursue careers in health fields to meet the increasing demands of an aging
California.
7. Introduce a new caregiver training and certification program to elevate the level of
care in all communities and all levels (informal, formal and IHSS) by expanding access
to evidence-based education and training.
8. Launch a California Blue Zone City challenge to encourage local and regional
collaboration and innovation in designing built urban environments.
9. Launch a Californians for All Care Corp program to address the challenges of social
isolation among an aging population and many young people's desire to serve their
community.
10. Model a statewide standard of care to the nation that standardizes how healthcare
practitioners identify, screen or diagnose for dementia.
More information can be found at CAAlzTaskForce.org or by clicking on this link: file:///C:/Users/mcilp/Downloads/Alz%20Task%20Force%20Press%20Release%20--%2011.19.20%20--%20English%20(1).pdf
A Tidbit from Me:  MarinCIL services and programs promote social determinants of health to ensure that everyone can live with dignity and participate in all aspects of community life. I am excited about these innovative recommendations and look forward to hearing more from the task force.  Much more to come and I can’t wait!
The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

Covid-19, Master Plan on Aging, DRC Releases New Report on Detention Center, and much More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on November 17, 2020

Good Morning Brothers and Sisters in Community,
I hope you are having a wonderful week so far. There is a lot happening relating to Covid-19. It is important that all of us stay safe and practice social distancing. My motto is: “Take care of ourselves and each other.” Here is the PM report for you today. Sending a smile your way!

County of Marin Update
Marin Joins Statewide Cautionary COVID-19 Step Back to Red Tier 2
Marin County is one of 40 California counties tightening restrictions per State of California mandates in response to a surge of COVID-19 cases across the state and region. 
Governor Gavin Newsom announced today that Marin was moved from orange to red, to use common virus status terminology. The step back comes just three days after the Marin County Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notified local businesses and agencies about preemptive restrictions to stem the virus’ spread locally. But Monday, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) officially moved Marin from orange-colored Tier 3 (“moderate risk”) to the more restrictive red Tier 2 (“substantial risk”) on its Blueprint for a Safer Economy.
Twenty-eight counties on Monday were moved into the purple Tier 1, the most restrictive status on the Blueprint scale, because of widespread virus spread. Marin is now one of 11 counties out of 58 in red Tier 2 status; 41 are in purple Tier 1.
The primary restrictions beginning Tuesday, November 17, are:

  • Retail establishments and indoor malls are allowed at 50% capacity
  • Office workspaces are allowed for essential workers; nonessential workers should work remote only
  • Restaurants are allowed outdoor service only
  • Bars and breweries closed unless serving full meals outdoors
  • Wineries are allowed outdoor service only
  • Personal care services are allowed indoors
  • Museums are allowed at 25% capacity
  • Places of worship are allowed at 25% capacity or 100 people (whichever is fewer)
  • Libraries are allowed at 50% capacity
  • Movie theaters are allowed at 25% capacity or 100 people (whichever is fewer)
  • Cardrooms are allowed outdoor service only
  • Other family entertainment centers are allowed outdoor service only
  • Gyms and fitness centers are allowed at 10% capacity
  • Indoor pools are not allowed
The change to Tier 2 does not affect Marin’s school reopening process. Local schools started re-opening on September 8 while the county was in the purple tier, and now 70% of Marin schools are open to some form of classroom-based learning. So far, there have been no cases of COVID-19 infection that occurred within school settings.
Read Full Press Release.
Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal

Marin officials urge holiday caution as virus surges
By MATTHEW PERA | mpera@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: November 16, 2020 at 8:00 p.m. | UPDATED: November 17, 2020 at 8:58 a.m.
Marin County health officials are urging people to use caution during holiday travel and not to gather indoors this Thanksgiving as coronavirus infections surge throughout California.
“The safest way to celebrate this holiday season is virtually or with members of your household,” officials said in a list of holiday guidelines issued by the county’s Department of Health and Human Services. “Gathering with people outside your household — even extended family — increases the risk of getting and spreading COVID-19.”
Traveling during the holiday is discouraged because it could result in increased coronavirus spread. According to the guidelines, “high-risk” activities include traveling on planes, buses, trains and other shared vehicles without face masks. Close contact between people who do not live together without face masks is also risky, health officials said.
“Marin residents considering travel should know that COVID-19 rates are high in many regions across the country, and not everyone around you will always be taking the right precautions,” said Dr. Matt Willis, the county’s public health officer. “Keep doing the things you’re doing to protect yourself and others, even if the people are around you are not.”
AAA is anticipating a 13% drop in Thanksgiving travel this year in California. While the company is expecting car travel to drop by 7%, it predicts a 48% reduction in air travel and a 77% decrease in other forms of travel, including by bus, train or cruise ship.
Source: Marin officials urge holiday caution as virus surges

Marin health district offers virus care to nursing homes
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: November 16, 2020 at 7:09 p.m. | UPDATED: November 17, 2020 at 7:13 a.m.
The Marin Healthcare District is seeking permission from local nursing homes to help provide medical care to residents who test positive for COVID-19.
The district’s board gave the green light this month to reallocate $183,000 previously approved for COVID-19 testing in local nursing homes to provide medical care.
In May, the district’s board, which oversees the publicly owned MarinHealth Medical Center, approved spending more than $800,000 to fund two mobile testing units in the county. So far, about $237,000 has been spent.
One of the units was dedicated to the county’s 50 residential care centers for seniors and 10 skilled nursing centers, which, along with San Rafael’s predominantly Latino Canal neighborhood, have been the epicenters for Marin coronavirus cases.
“These skilled nursing facilities have medical directors,” said district board member Dr. Brian Su, “but some of these medical directors have not been as hands-on as we would like when it comes to after care.”
Dr. Elizabeth Lowe, who oversaw the nursing home testing team and presented the proposal to the district board on Nov. 10, said, “It’s a bit of a misstatement to call it after care because we really didn’t have any. We relied on these patients’ primary care doctors or medical directors to provide care, and the reality is it just didn’t happen.”
“I feel like as a physician I can call out another physician when they have not provided the best care,” Lowe said, “and I can say they have not provided the best care.”
Lowe said many nursing home residents also have not filled out physician orders to indicate whether they want to be placed on a ventilator or receive other life-sustaining treatments if they become sick with COVID-19. She said most nursing homes default to sending residents to the hospital.
According to Marin’s public health division, as of Thursday 83 residents at residential care centers and skilled nursing centers in Marin had died due to COVID-19. They have accounted for nearly 84% of COVID-19 deaths in the county.
Source: Marin health district offers virus care to nursing homes

Fairfax diverts police funds to racial equity committee
By MATTHEW PERA | mpera@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: November 16, 2020 at 6:05 p.m. | UPDATED: November 17, 2020 at 7:21 a.m.
Fairfax officials have cut the town’s police budget by $100,000 and allocated the money to the new Racial Equity and Social Justice Committee.
The committee, made up of 13 Fairfax residents and two council members, held its first meeting this month.
“I’m very proud of this committee,” said Councilwoman Stephanie Hellman. “It’s primarily comprised of Black, Indigenous and people of color from the Fairfax community, and that was by design.”
About two dozen people applied to sit on the committee, which will serve as an advisory group to the Town Council. The 13 members were chosen after each candidate was interviewed by council members over video conference calls. Hellman and Vice Mayor Bruce Ackerman were appointed as council representatives on the committee.
Ackerman said town officials decided to fund the committee in response to ongoing Black Lives Matter protests in Fairfax. The demonstrations began after the in-custody death of George Floyd in Minneapolis on Memorial Day. In addition to racial equity issues, the committee is also charged with discussing police policies in Fairfax.
“Given the fact that we were having protests every day and that there’s an awful lot going on with this topic, it seems like a moment in history to try to step up to these questions,” Ackerman said.
Cuts to the police department include a $75,000 reduction in employee overtime pay and a $25,000 reduction in funding for the countywide Major Crimes Task Force, which was disbanded this year. An agreement to establish a new crime squad is on the Marin County Board of Supervisors’ agenda for Tuesday. Fairfax will not participate.
Source: Fairfax diverts police funds to racial equity committee

Sharing from Disability Rights California
Disability Rights California Releases New Investigative Report Finding Inadequate Conditions at Otay Mesa Detention Center
Conditions shown pose serious risks to people with disabilities while violating human and civil rights
Nov 17, 2020
(San Diego, CA) Today, Disability Rights California (DRC) releases a new report, “Otay Mesa Detention Center: Inhumane Conditions and the Harsh Realities of ICE’s Civil Detention System.” 
This report shines a much-needed light on the inadequate conditions of Otay Mesa Detention Center (“Otay Mesa”), located in San Diego, California after a year-long investigation.
Based on our findings, DRC investigation confirms the conditions in Otay Mesa violate ICE’s own standards as well as those required by the U.S. Constitution and federal statutes prohibiting disability discrimination. People with disabilities detained there, as well as other people in detention, experience serious psychological and physical harm due to:
  • Inadequate mental health treatment;
  • An unreliable system for providing accommodations to people with disabilities;
  • Excessive and harsh use of isolation and solitary confinement, including unjustified isolation of people based on their medical conditions;
  • Punitive treatment that should not be imposed on civil detainees such as those housed at Otay Mesa;
  • Inadequate medical care and the denial of needed dental care;
  • Discriminatory treatment of people who identify as LGBTQ+; and
  • An inadequate response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
DRC initiated this investigation in response to complaints from people detained there as well as numerous media reports.1 Most recently, following a death at the facility due to lack of COVID-19 precautions and medical neglect, ICE’s own Inspector General, two Congressional committees, and a Senator from California have called for more oversight.2 Even the facility guards have sued over poor conditions at Otay Mesa.3
Despite years of reports, complaints, and calls for reform, Otay Mesa has failed to reform its system and pose serious risks to people with disabilities while violating human and civil rights. These failures make it clear that the current system of immigration detention is dangerous and constitutionally inadequate for all people, and especially for those with disabilities.4
“Our investigation found that the conditions at Otay Mesa are punitive and inhumane. No person, including people with disabilities, should be subject to such conditions, especially considering that the people in ICE custody at Otay Mesa are civil detainees,” said Richard Diaz. “ICE must end its reliance on private, for profit prisons and find alternatives to its current system of immigration detention.”
People in civil detention centers should not be subjected to punitive and inhumane conditions.cTherefore, we recommend that people with disabilities should no longer be housed at Otay Mesa Detention Center.
Source: Disability Rights California Releases New Investigative Report Finding Inadequate Conditions at Otay Mesa Detention Center

Sharing from the ARC of California
The Direct Support Workforce and COVID-19 National Survey Report 2020
The Institute on Community Integration and the National Alliance for Direct Support Professionals collaborated to lift up the voice of the direct support workforce. The aim of this study was to gather evidence about the experiences of the direct support workforce during the COVID-19 pandemic and to inform efforts to better prepare for future waves of this pandemic.
For full study and recommendations: The Direct Support Workforce and COVID-19 National Survey Report 2020

Building a Master Plan for Aging: Key Elements from States Planning for an Aging Population
SUMMARY
This brief highlights states that have developed a Master Plan for Aging, examples of key elements, and how states without a Master Plan can get started.
The United States will reach a turning point in 2030 where 1 in 5 Americans is age 65 and older, growing to 1 in 4 by 2060.1 The older adult population is increasing and people are living longer, but have fewer caregiver resources than previous generations to provide support as needs and abilities change.2 States, localities, and communities will experience greater demand for services and opportunities for innovation , both of which require farsighted investments in planning. The current COVID-19 pandemic provides a powerful example of these realities, dramatically underscoring the increased need for a thoughtful and integrated community-based health and long-term services and supports (LTSS) infrastructure at the same time governors are coping with serious fiscal constraints. This conundrum is shining a bright light on both challenges and opportunities for reshaping how services are delivered to older adults, those aging with a disability, and their family caregivers.
States set policy and allocate resources that govern how care and services are organized, delivered, and regulated in all aspects of daily life that impact older people and adults aging with a disability. According to the AARP LTSS State Scorecard, the highest-performing states have one thing in common: a commitment to a comprehensive plan that guides policy choices and investments with the goal of ensuring that their aging populations can live with dignity in the settings of their choice. As roughly 70 percent of Americans age 65 and older will need at least some help as they age, forward-thinking states have taken the bold step to develop a clearly articulated Master Plan for Aging.3
This brief offers a definition of Master Plan for Aging, and highlights work being done in states to develop and implement a Master Plan. Drawing from the work in these states, the brief delineates key leadership and structural elements for developing a successful Master Plan while addressing cross-cutting themes to guide the planning process. Finally, the brief shows how states without a formal Master Plan effort may already have state action in one or more of those key elements.
For full summary: Building a Master Plan for Aging: Key Elements from States Planning for an Aging Population
A Tidbit from Me: I served as a member of the Master Plan on Aging Long-Term Services and Supports Advisory Committee. The recommendations from the Master Plan are now being reviewed by the Newsom Administration. I am including a link so you can learn more about the development of  California’s Master Plan on Aging: Together We Engage

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

Major Developments with Covid-19, Project Homekey, Webinars, a New Resource for our Communities


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on November 16, 2020

Good Morning my Brothers and Sisters in Community,

I hope you had a wonderful, restful weekend. This morning is very brisk and I am looking forward to my morning walk with Latte the Wonder Dog. Latte is a cattle-dog. We incorporate social distancing and Covid protocol during our morning stroll. So much happening in our world today. So let’s get to it. Wishing you all a wonderful day!

County of Marin Update
Marin Tightens Restrictions To Contain Spread
With COVID-19 transmission and hospitalizations on the rise across the region, Bay Area health officers are tightening local rules for higher-risk indoor activities where the virus can spread more easily.
In Marin County, case rates have nearly doubled in the past 10 days and continue to rise, prompting Public Health Officer Dr. Matt Willis to issue an order to tighten restrictions to limit further spread of the virus. Under the order, the following industries should reduce operations to match “red” Tier 2 allowances within the State of California’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy, effective Tuesday, November 17:

  • Retail / malls – reduce capacity to 50%
  • Office work spaces – work remotely
  • Libraries – reduce capacity to 50%
  • Museums – reduce capacity to 25%
  • Places of worship – reduce capacity to 25% or 100 people (whichever is fewer)
  • Gyms and fitness centers – reduce capacity to 10%
  • Wineries – operate outdoor only
  • Family entertainment centers – operate outdoor only
  • Cardrooms – operate outdoor only
  • Indoor pools – close
  • Bars and breweries (with no meal option) – close
Marin businesses shall operate in strict compliance with the state’s guidance for the red tier.
In addition, the county will be joining counties across the region to close all indoor dining operations, including:
  • Indoor dining at restaurants
  • Indoor movie theater concessions
  • Indoor food courts
Marin joins other Bay Area counties in tightening restrictions for indoor environments and follows San Francisco move to ban indoor dining earlier this week.
“We’re choosing to move into the red tier before the state moves us to get in front of this surge,” Willis said. “We’re seeing more people getting sick with COVID-19 and needing hospitalization. With flu season and potential impacts from holiday gatherings and travel, it’s time to act to prevent a much larger surge.”
If Marin’s average daily case rate continues its current momentum, projections show Marin could return to purple Tier 1 status as early as November 24.

“As COVID-19 rates increase, indoor environments where facial covering is not used, like restaurants, become less safe because there’s a higher probability that you’re sharing the space with someone who is infected,” Willis said. “This isn’t limited to the business environment but applies to holiday gatherings and travel as well.”  
RELATED RESOURCES:  
 
California, Oregon and Washington Issue Travel Advisories
Just four days after Marin County and 10 other Bay Area jurisdictions issued recommendations for safe holiday celebrations and travel, the State of California joined forces with Oregon and Washington to issue a similar travel advisory, urging visitors entering their states or returning home from travel outside these states to self-quarantine to slow the spread of the virus. The travel advisories urge against non-essential out-of-state travel, ask people to self-quarantine for 14 days after arriving from another state or country and encourage residents to stay local.
In addition to urging individuals arriving from other states or countries to self-quarantine for 14 days after arrival, the states’ travel advisories recommend individuals limit their interactions to their immediate household. The advisories define essential travel as travel for work and study, critical infrastructure support, economic services and supply chains, health, immediate medical care and safety and security.
RELATED RESOURCES:  
 
 Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal

State officials rebuke Marin for ditching homeless project

By WILL HOUSTON | whouston@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: November 14, 2020 at 11:18 a.m. | UPDATED: November 15, 2020 at 12:59 p.m.
State officials are criticizing the Marin County Board of Supervisors for ending controversial negotiations to buy a Novato hotel for apartments for the homeless.
In a letter to the board, California Housing and Community Development Director Gustavo Velasquez said the decision not to proceed with purchasing Inn Marin and Suites was “very troubling” given the time and the $11.9 million in funding the state was willing to provide to complete the deal.
The supervisors voted to end negotiations with the hotel’s owners on Tuesday. The county said it could not agree on a price.
“The cost of the project, to the best of the State’s knowledge, has been consistent,” Velasquez wrote in his letter on Thursday. “If there was an issue regarding the financial support of the project, the county failed to engage with the state to discuss.”
The Inn Marin and Suite’s owners, Dipak and Rita Patel, were asking $18 million for the property. A county appraisal of the property found it to be valued at $14.5 million.
The state had approved an $11.9 million grant for the county to use to purchase the 70-room inn as part of the state’s Homekey program. Under the program, which launched in July, the state is providing $800 million in grants to cities and counties to buy hotels to convert to housing for homeless residents impacted by the coronavirus pandemic.
Source:  State officials rebuke Marin for ditching homeless project
A Tidbit from Me: The loss of the Inn Marin site in Novato for Project Homekey makes me sad. For transparency, for many years I benefitted from accessible, affordable housing in Marin; including my first accessible apartment on Leafwood Drive in Novato where I lived in the 1980’s. I benefitted from the Housing Choice Voucher program, which is also known as section 8. I wouldn’t be where I am today if these types of initiatives were not available to me years ago. I grew up in Novato and while I love my hometown and all the wonderful people; affordable housing has always been difficult to create. I look forward to the day when accessible and affordable housing is embraced by all communities including my hometown. As I mentioned in my Thursday PM Report Marin CIL, together with the Marin Organizing Committee and Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California as well as other community members, testified in support of Project Homekey at this week’s Board of Supervisors Meeting. Marin CIL is recognized as one of the key safety-net agencies providing advocacy and support service to people with disabilities and older adults in Marin. One of our signature services is housing support. Marin CIL assists our community members in locating accessible and affordable housing, along with housing retention, and advocacy. The high cost of housing, together with the lack of accessible and affordable housing, significantly impacts the communities we serve every day. Initiatives that support accessible, affordable housing truly benefit our communities.

Investigators probe threats to Marin Native American museum
By WILL HOUSTON | whouston@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: November 15, 2020 at 12:24 p.m. | UPDATED: November 15, 2020 at 8:50 p.m.
Authorities are investigating two suspicious letters that were sent to the Marin Museum of the American Indian that contained the words “smallpox” and “anthrax” on the envelopes.
The Novato museum reported that the anonymous letters arrived after protesters toppled the Junipero Serra statue at Mission San Rafael Arcangel last month. The museum also received racist emails after the protest, according Doug Fryday, the museum’s president.
“I find no logical rationale for something like this to go on,” Fryday said. “It is just pure ignorance.”
The U.S. Postal Inspection Service and Novato Police Department are investigating the letters, which were postmarked on Oct. 23 from the state of New York.
“You’re not allowed to use the mail to threaten people,” said Jeff Fitch, a spokesman for the postal inspection office. “There are a number of statutes that cover mailing threats or saying there are things that could be harmful inside this letter. This is something we take seriously.”
The postal service’s sorting process includes passing letters through anthrax detection equipment. The letters would have been flagged had anthrax been detected, Fitch said.
Anthrax, a deadly bacteria, is most notorious for being used in the 2001 attacks in which anthrax-laced letters were sent to elected officials, news outlets and other recipents. Five people were killed and 17 others were sickened, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
The sender of the Novato letters has not been identified, Fitch said.
Source: Investigators probe threats to Marin Native American museum

2nd virus vaccine shows overwhelming success in U.S. tests
By ASSOCIATED PRESS |
PUBLISHED: November 16, 2020 at 5:33 a.m. | UPDATED: November 16, 2020 at 6:16 a.m.
By LAURAN NEERGAARD
Moderna said Monday its COVID-19 vaccine is proving to be highly effective in a major trial, a second dash of hope in the global race for a shot to tame a resurgent virus that is now killing more than 8,000 people a day worldwide.
The company said its vaccine appears to be 94.5% effective, according to preliminary data from Moderna’s ongoing study. A week ago, competitor Pfizer Inc. announced its own COVID-19 vaccine appeared similarly effective — news that puts both companies on track to seek permission within weeks for emergency use in the U.S.
A vaccine can’t come fast enough, as virus cases topped 11 million in the U.S. over the weekend — 1 million of them recorded in just the past week. The pandemic has killed more than 1.3 million people worldwide, more than 245,000 of them in the U.S.
Dr. Stephen Hoge, Moderna’s president, welcomed the “really important milestone” but said having similar results from two different companies is what’s most reassuring.
“That should give us all hope that actually a vaccine is going to be able to stop this pandemic and hopefully get us back to our lives,” Hoge told The Associated Press.
“It won’t be Moderna alone that solves this problem. It’s going to require many vaccines” to meet the global demand, he added.
Still, if U.S. regulators allow emergency use of Moderna’s or Pfizer’s candidates, there will be limited, rationed supplies before the end of the year. Both require people to get two shots, several weeks apart. Moderna expects to have about 20 million doses, earmarked for the U.S., by the end of 2020. Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech expect to have about 50 million doses globally by year’s end.
Source: 2nd virus vaccine shows overwhelming success in U.S. tests

Marin man’s legal career lands him before Supreme Court
By KERI BRENNER | kbrenner@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: November 12, 2020 at 10:01 a.m. | UPDATED: November 15, 2020 at 5:11 p.m.
California led a coalition of 20 states and the District of Columbia in defending the continuation of the federal Affordable Care Act Tuesday — and the man presenting the case might have looked familiar to some in Marin.
Presenting oral arguments for the law’s defense was California Solicitor General Michael Mongan, a Tamalpais High School graduate. Mongan spoke for California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, who in April 2018 first filed the motion to intervene in the case, and was joined by the attorneys general in the other states.
The case has reached the Supreme Court at a time when the country is polarized politically, recovering from an historic presidential election and reeling from an out-of-control coronavirus pandemic.
The act, which provides health care insurance coverage for 21 million Americans — including those with preexisting conditions — is in danger of being dismantled by a lawsuit filed by the Trump administration and Republican attorneys general in Texas and 17 other states.
I’m very proud, and very moved,” said Barbara Owens, a former trustee for the Tamalpais Union High School District. Owens was Mongan’s English teacher his junior year.
“He was a terrific student, all the way around,” Owens said. “He was making a contribution before, but I’m so thrilled that he is now making a contribution that is in support of all of us.”
Mongan, 41, of Corte Madera was born in Marin and attended kindergarten through eighth grade in the Sausalito Marin City School District public schools. He graduated in 1997 from Tam High School. His parents still live in Sausalito, and his older brother is a physician at UCSF Medical Center.
“It was a tremendous honor,” Mongan said Thursday about his Supreme Court appearance. Because of the the pandemic, he made his argument over the internet from a conference room at the attorney general’s office in San Francisco.
Although Mongan was the legal face of the defense, his arguments reflected hundreds of hours of research and briefs by “a huge team of people that’s been working on this case that was filed several years ago,” Mongan said.
Source: Marin man’s legal career lands him before Supreme Court

Sharing from CDCAN
The Department of Developmental Services (DDS) is scheduled to host a third informational Zoom meeting - presented in Spanish (en espanol) for individuals with developmental disabilities (self-advocates) and families (though everyone is welcome)  on the regional center program known as "Participant Directed Services" (see below for details). 
    According to the department, the November 21st Zoom meeting will be presented in Spanish (en Espanol) with simultaneous English interpretation. There was no information posted however on whether American Sign Language or other language translations will be provided for the November 21st Zoom meeting..  
    Like the two previous informational Zoom meetings, the November 21st meeting is meant to focus on information and questions regarding "Participant Directed Services."
    The department held two informational Zoom meetings on November 7th and 10th - in English (with several language translations including American Sign Language) on this issue.
    Persons interested in participating in the November 21st informational hearing will need to register in advance (see below). 
    "Participant Directed Services" has been available since 2011 and was recently expanded to included three additional services under a department directive issued last spring (see below for the department directive).
    The "Participant Directed Services" is different from the "Self Determination Program" that has been undergoing implementation 
   CDCAN NOTE: To receive the free CDCAN Reports, send email request to Marty Omoto (with "CDCAN Reports Subscribe" in the subject line) to: martyomoto@att.net

 What the November 21st Zoom Informational Meeting Will Cover
    According to the Department of Developmental Services, the November 21st informational Zoom meeting - like the previous English version meetings held on November 7th and 10th -  will have identical presentation covering:
      •  Updates from DDS {Department of Developmental Services]
      •  Information about Participant-Directed Services
      •  Hearing from you

    According to the department, presentations on both dates will be in English with simultaneous English translation. There was no information posted on the department's webpage whether or not American Sign Language interpretation will be provided or if other language translations will be provided.  
 
WHEN: NOVEMBER 21, 2020  (SATURDAY)
TIME: 10:00 - 11:30 AM (Pacific Time)
AGENCY: DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES
WHAT: INFORMATIONAL MEETING ON "PARTICIPANT DIRECTED SERVICES" FOR PERSONS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES (SELF ADVOCATES) AND FAMILIES (THOUGH EVERYONE IS WELCOME) - PRESENTATION IN SPANISH (Esta es una reunión en español con interpretación simultánea en inglés)
PURPOSE: Provide updates, answer questions and provide information on "Participant Directed Sewrvices" 
REGISTER FOR NOVEMBER 21, 2020 ZOOM MEETING (REQUIRED)
https://cal-dds.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAtcOurrD0rGtLP2Udr15k60Nht_zOzYCj1
PHONE ACCESS (NO ADVANCE REGISTRATION REQUIRED): To access the November 21, 2020, Participant Directed Services Informational Meetring: 
    PHONE NUMBER: 1 669 900 6833  
    PHONE WEBINAR ID: 940 7232 6106
MEETING MATERIALS (AGENDA AND OTHER DOCUMENTS): 
    PRESENTATION - SELF-ADVOCATE & FAMILY MEMBER INFORMATIONAL EVENT (EVENTO INFORMATIVO PARA AUTO-DEFENSORES Y FAMILIAS) - PARTICIPANT DIRECTED SERVICES (Servicios
Dirigidos por el Participante) -  November 7 & 10, 2020  - PDF Document (20 pages):
    English Version: :
    https://www.dds.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Self-Advocate-Family-Meeting_presentation_11102020.pdf
    Spanish (En Espanol) Version:
https://www.dds.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Self-Advocate-Family-Meeting_presentation_Spanish_11102020.pdf  
MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THESE INFORMATIONAL ZOOM MEETINGS
  EMAIL: FamilyInput@dds.ca.gov
Update: Department's Self Advocate and Family Statewide Survey May Be Launched This Week
    The Department of Developmental Services indicated that it may be launching this coming week - possibly sometime on Monday (November 16th), a statewide survey for persons with developmental disabilities (referred to as "Self Advocates") and families.  
    The idea and need for a statewide survey conducted by the department, was mentioned at a earlier department stakeholder meetings including recent series of informational meetings on"Particpant Directed Services" and also during the monthly check-in meeting of the full Developmental Services Task Force held earlier this month.  

Sharing from the Marin Public Charge Workgroup
Food
  • CalFresh has expanded EBT Online to include a number of Albertsons, Safeway, and Vons locations across California. This is in addition to Amazon and Walmart offering EBT Online, statewide. You can find our updated EBT Online materials (flyer, retain info sheet, FAQ, social media samples) here: https://www.cdss.ca.gov/ebt-online.   If you have any further questions regarding these materials, please reach out to the CDSS CalFresh Outreach team at CalFreshAccess@dss.ca.gov.  For specific questions regarding EBT Online, please reach out to the CDSS EBT email inbox at CDSSEBT@dss.ca.gov.
Child Care
  • Community Action Marin is seeking independent family childcare providers across Marin County to join their network. For more information or to apply, contact: Leydis Mata at 415-306-2803, lmata@camarin.org.
Mental Health and Trauma
  • The Behavioral Health and Recovery Services Division in Marin County (BHRS) is leading a pilot project to learn how digital technology can support wellness for those who feel isolated as part of a state-wide initiative called Help@Hand.  The program is designed to help monolingual Spanish Speaking older adults (60+) who self-identify as feeling isolated or those who live alone to use technology to help support their wellness and connection to others.  Program components include: small group training in using computers paired with one-on-one follow up and coaching; no-cost access to digital wellness apps and encouragement and coaching to use them; free tablets for some participants based on highest need (limited); small incentives for completion of surveys and participation in focus groups to help BHRS learn what is most helpful for Marin older adults.  For more information or to refer a potential participant, contact:  Damaris Caro, Peer Counselor (English and Spanish), Dcaro@marincounty.org, (415) 858-5526 or Lorraine Wilson, Project Coordinator (English Only), lowilson@marincounty.org, (415) 747-7890.
 
  • Marin County Behavioral Health and Recovery Services applied for and was awarded a grant through the California Health Facilities Financing Authority (CHFFA). As a result of this grant award, effective Monday 11/9/2020, the  Mobile Crisis Response Team will be expanding the hours of operation to Monday through Friday 8AM – 9PM and 1pm – 9 pm on Saturday.  Contact Todd Paler with questions: tpaler@marincounty.org.  Multi-lingual flyers attached (MRCT…).
   
Marin HHS
 
  • HHS will host a Town Hall series. The first two town halls (English and Spanish) will review important programs and services offered by Social Services and Behavioral Health. The second two (English and Spanish) will talk about job and career opportunities with the County of Marin. The first meeting is this coming Tuesday Nov 17th from 5:30-7:00.
`
Sharing from National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC):
Join today’s (November 16) national call on coronavirus, disasters, housing, and homelessness at 2:30-4 pm ET (11:30-1pm PST).  We will get an update from Peter Hepburn at The Eviction Lab on the impacts of the CDC eviction moratorium, hear about new NLIHC research on the use of FEMA Public Assistance funds to house people experiencing homelessness, and share information about a November 19 National Call-In Day to demand urgent congressional action on COVID-19 relief. We will also share the latest on the pandemic-relief negotiations on Capitol Hill, receive updates from the field, and more. Register for the call at: https://tinyurl.com/ru73qan

The Agenda for Today's Call
  • Welcome and Introductions
    • Diane Yentel, National Low Income Housing Coalition
  • Update on CDC Eviction Moratorium
    • Peter Hepburn, The Eviction Lab, Princeton University
  • Report on the Use of FEMA Public Assistance Funds to House People Experiencing Homelessness
    • Alayna Calabro, NLIHC
  • From the Field
    • Bambie Hayes-Brown, Georgia Act
    • Bob Palmer, Housing Action Illinois
  • National Call-In Day on November 19
    • Tori Bourret, NLIHC
  • Capitol Hill Update
    • Sarah Saadian, NLIHC
Register Here

Sharing from the ARC of California
 ANNOUNCING Project Connect: Disability Support Phone Line
Take time for your mental health, it is IMPORTANT! As the holidays rapidly approach and the Country is still in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic many people are expressing feelings of depression, stress, anxiety, isolation, fear and other emotions that can make it challenging to get through the day let alone the holiday season. The Arc of California and the Stony Brook University School of Social Welfare have partnered to offer Project Connect, a telehealth support line for individuals with disabilities, their families, direct support professionals, and others who support individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. The Project Connect support line is staffed by graduate students in the School of Social Welfare and supervised by licensed social workers. The graduate students are able to offer a wide range of support services including counseling, wellness checks, depression screening, and referral to community services.
Remember, you are not alone! Take the time to talk, Project Connect is FREE and we hope that you will use it. Whether you are just feeling a little down and need someone to talk to, or you feel that you need on-going support Project Connect is here for you 1 (888) 847-3209. 24 hours 7 days a week.

Sharing from Disability Rights California
Self-Advocacy in Action: Know Your Rights and How to Advocate for Them
Come Join Us - Self-Advocacy in Action: Know Your Rights and How to Advocate for Them.
If you have a disability, you may know the challenges we all face to advocate on our own behalf. Learn how to regain control of your life by applying new self-advocacy skills. Find out how to develop a self-advocacy plan and advocate to achieve your own goals.
This training is presented from a peer perspective by people who have lived experience with mental disabilities
When:
November 17, 2020
11:00 AM
Pacific Standard Time
Register Today
About the webinar:
Join us to learn everything you wanted to know about LPS conservatorship. Find out what it means to be on conservatorship. Learn about the duties of a conservator, how to request money or other information from a conservator, how to appeal conservatorship and ways to avoid being put on conservatorship. Know that we all have rights when it comes to conservatorship!
Speakers:
Debi Davis, MSW, is a person with lived experience and a long-time mental health advocate. She volunteered for 10 years with Riverside County Patient Rights Office. For the past 12 and a half years, Ms. Davis has worked in the Peer and Self-Advocacy unit of Disability Rights California, facilitating self-advocacy groups at a state hospital and facilities in the community.
Source: Self-Advocacy in Action: Know Your Rights and How to Advocate for Them

Sharing from Rooted in Rights

Four Ways to Improve Crisis Intervention Services for the Disability Community
Tuesday, November 10, 2020
By Kris McElroy
In 2012, my own fear of the police due to previous trauma impacted my ability to call the crisis response team for a friend who was having a mental health crisis. My trauma informed my belief that if I called them, they would send the police who wouldn’t have the skills to help, and as a result my friend would be badly hurt or lose their life. I thought I could figure out a safer option to help. Unfortunately, I received news the following morning that my friend died of suicide. I struggled with my decision, feeling like I should have done something different and that I failed to help so I was responsible for what happened. I was confused about how to use crisis intervention services when my own experiences showed that it can make situations worse. I needed to know where to turn for “safe” help.
Years later, I carry that experience alongside my other trauma. And even though I carry a wallet card to give emergency response team personnel and law enforcement which explains my disabilities, I am still worried about what could happen to me as a result of racism or stigma related to my disabilities or gender identity? Will I be able to access “safe” help? Will my wallet card really help?
As protests against police brutality grow, discussions of police reforms and mental health system reforms are ongoing. But there continues to be tragic headlines of police brutality against individuals in crisis including Linden Cameron, a young boy with Asperger’s who was severely injured, and Daniel Prude, a man with a mental health disability who was killed.
The emotional toll and the effects on mental health and overall well-being from events like these feel almost never-ending. The impacts on individuals with disabilities and families are immense.
Navigating crisis intervention services has been incredibly challenging for my friends, family, and community members, and for me—a biracial black man with multiple disabilities, including autism and complex hereditary spastic paraplegia. I wish it wasn’t so challenging, and I especially wish these services didn’t so frequently end up increasing trauma or end in individuals losing their lives instead of getting the help they need and deserve.
Undue harm and death are disproportionately the result when black and brown individuals with disabilities are experiencing a mental health crisis. These tragedies create barriers and a lack of access to supports needed for individuals and families, leading to further declines in wellbeing.
Improving Crisis Intervention Services in the Community
Crisis intervention services that serve communities need to improve in order to dismantle the barriers that inhibit individuals and families from receiving access to safe supports. First, there should be non-law enforcement options as first responders to crisis situations. And second, anti-racism, disability awareness, cultural competency, and mental health first aid are four essential areas of training that I believe should be required for crisis intervention. These trainings are centered in providing first responders and public service personnel, including law enforcement, the tools to better help the communities being served.
Anti-racism training is rooted in promoting greater racial equity by guiding participants to learn how to be aware of, challenge, and change institutional racial inequalities. Disability awareness training provides the opportunity to learn about different disabilities, misconceptions, accessible communication, and etiquette on responding based on the needs of an individual in crisis. Mental health first aid training provides an opportunity to gain tools and strategies for de-escalating and responding to mental health crisis situations in a safer manner while also decreasing stigma by focusing on expanding understanding of behaviors, challenges, and complexities of mental illness. And finally, cultural competency training helps participants develop awareness and understanding of their own culture, worldviews, values, and biases, and teaches how dynamics of difference influence interactions when providing services/responding to crisis situations.
Full Article: Four Ways to Improve Crisis Intervention Services for the Disability Community

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

GGB Toll Hike, Barriers to Special Education, Joint Statement from the ARC and UCP, and Much More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on November 13, 2020

Good Morning my Brothers and Sisters in Community,

Happy Friday! There was a little more of the winter chill in the air this morning. I must admit I got up a little bit slow this morning. The theme for today is: More Coffee!! Wishing you all the very best. Lot’s going on. Here is the PM Report for you today.

County of Marin Update

Public Health introduces new restrictions to stem COVID-19 surge
Marin County worked hard to graduate from red to orange COVID-19 status in October, but its residents will have to double down on efforts to prevent a step backward in the pandemic economic recovery.
As coronavirus cases surge in Marin, regionally, and nationally, the Public Health Division of Marin County Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) said new precautions in the next few days and weeks will determine whether Marin is relegated back to the red Tier 2 (substantial risk) from the orange Tier 3 (moderate risk) on the State of California’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy scale.
Marin HHS has introduced recommended actions for industries and activities labeled higher risk for virus transmission. Businesses and organizations are being asked to take the following steps immediately: 

  • reduce indoor dining capacity from 50% to 25%;
  • reduce indoor movie theater capacity from 50% to 25% and close concessions; and
  • reduce capacity of indoor faith-based and cultural ceremonies from 50% to 25%.
Dr. Matt Willis, the County’s Public Health Officer, said the recommendations will become requirements Tuesday, November 17, if the trend of increased cases numbers continues.
Earlier this week, the average COVID-19 reported cases per day in Marin was double the average of the previous three weeks. If that rate is maintained or continues to increase, Marin will return to red Tier 2 status or Purple Tier 1 status as of November 24. Willis reminded the Marin County Board of Supervisors during its November 10 meeting that he has the option to invoke stricter public health policies than the state recommends.
“As COVID-19 rates increase across our community, public indoor environments become less safe because there is a higher probability that someone who is infected is indoors with you,” said Dr. Willis. “We’re seeing an increasing trend of cases linked to indoor gatherings and environments where masks are often removed, such as restaurants. Taking proactive steps in these high-risk areas could help prevent a shift in tier status which would result in even greater restrictions.” 
In late August, Marin was placed in purple Tier 1 (widespread risk) when the Blueprint for a Safer Economy scale was introduced. It was moved to red Tier 2 in mid-September and orange Tier 3 in late October. Businesses, schools, offices and other agencies must adhere to the state-mandated guidelines by taking precautions against the spread of COVID-19.
Marin HHS is not only urging residents to play it safe during holiday travel and gatherings, but doctors said strong consideration should be given to COVID-19 testing as well. Marin County Public Health’s guidance for holiday travel and gatherings, in addition a list of safe alternatives for holiday celebrations, can be found at Coronavirus.MarinHHS.org/Celebrate-Safely.
Answers to frequently asked questions can be found on Public Health’s webpage.
 
Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal
Golden Gate Bridge considers $2 toll hike to prevent layoffs
By WILL HOUSTON | whouston@marinij.com |
PUBLISHED: November 11, 2020 at 5:33 p.m. | UPDATED: November 12, 2020 at 7:24 a.m.
Golden Gate Bridge tolls could temporarily rise by up to $2 to prevent nearly 150 bus and ferry workers from being laid off in December.
Federal stimulus grants have allowed the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District, which maintains the bridge as well as ferry and bus services, to avoid layoffs despite losing an average of $2 million per week in toll and transit fare revenue as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.
However, the district’s $52 million in federal relief funds are set to run out at the end of November with no replacement in sight.
“Every day we send some bus drivers home without driving while paying them for a full eight-hour day,” said Denis Mulligan, the district’s general manager. “And every day we have ferry deckhands that we’re keeping busy painting stuff, including curbs and bollards at the parking lot in Larkspur, just to keep them actively working. … Unfortunately, the pandemic has lasted much longer than anyone has anticipated, and unfortunately there hasn’t been another round of coronavirus relief.”
Source: Golden Gate Bridge considers $2 toll hike to prevent layoffs
For More Information or to listen: Special Meeting of Board of Directors - November 13, 2020
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL participates as a member of the Golden Gate Bridge Highway and Transportation Districts Accessibility Advisory Committee. For transparency is currently the Vice Chair of the Committee.

Sharing from FOX 2 KTVU

Unwelcome milestone: California hits million COVID-19 cases
By Brian Melley and Amy Taxin Published 22 hours ago Updated 7 hours ago Coronavirus in California Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - A month ago, Antonio Gomez III was a healthy 46-year-old struggling like so many others to balance work and parenting during the coronavirus pandemic. 
This week, he's struggling to breathe after a three-week bout with the deadly virus. 
Gomez let down his guard to see his parents and contracted one of the more than 1 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 in California. For months, the virus has hammered the economy, disproportionately affected the poor and upended daily life -- and now the state and the rest of the country are trying to curb another surge of infections.
California on Thursday became the second state -- behind Texas -- to eclipse a million known cases, while the U.S. has surpassed 10 million infections, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. The nation's most populous state -- with 40 million residents -- ranks 39th nationwide in the number of cases per 100,000 residents.
The timeline of COVID-19 in America often comes back to California. It had some of the earliest known cases among travelers from China, where the outbreak began. The Feb. 6 death of a San Jose woman is the first known coronavirus fatality in the U.S. That same month, California recorded the first U.S. case not related to travel and the first infection spread within the community.
On March 19, Gov. Gavin Newsom issued the nation's first statewide stay-at-home order, shuttering businesses and schools to try to prevent hospital overcrowding. 
Source: Unwelcome milestone: California hits million COVID-19 cases

Sharing from KCRA Channel 3
People coming to California should self-quarantine for 14 days, health dept. says
SACRAMENTO, Calif. —
Amid a surge in COVID-19 cases, the California Department of Public Health on Friday issued a travel advisory saying that people entering the state should self-quarantine for 14 days.
"The incidence of COVID-19 is increasing in many states and countries. Persons arriving in California from other states or Californians returning from other states or countries could increase the risk of COVID-19 spread," the travel advisory reads in part.
Advertisement
During the quarantine period, people should limit their interactions to their immediate household, the advisory says.
The health department's recommendation does not apply to people who cross state or country borders for travel that's deemed essential. Essential travel includes travel that is for work and study, critical infrastructure support, economic services and supply chains, health, immediate medical care, and safety and security.
The travel advisory comes on the heels of California reaching the grim milestone of the state recording more than 1 million coronavirus cases.
Source: People coming to California should self-quarantine for 14 days, health dept. says

Sharing from CNET
Question of the week from one of the PM Report’s valued readers:

What to do if your first stimulus check still hasn't arrived, including who to call
Many people are still wondering about the status of their first stimulus check -- or don't even know they even qualify for one. Here's what you need to know if you think this applies to you.
As leaders in Washington continue to work towards a new stimulus bill with a second stimulus check, you may be one of millions who qualified for the first stimulus check, but never got it.
The IRS is still delivering the remaining stimulus payments from the initial round and coordinating with local and regional agencies to identify people who may not know they qualified in the first place. For example, an estimated 9 million people who don't normally file taxes can still claim their check by Nov. 21.
If you never got the first stimulus check, but meet the eligibility requirements, follow these steps to track down and file a missing payment report with the IRS (scroll to the end for two phone numbers to call). The CNET stimulus check calculator can estimate your payment. And here are the most important things to know about stimulus checks right now. This story updates often.
I think my first stimulus check is late. When should I report it to the IRS? 
If you're certain you meet the qualifications to receive the first stimulus check, these are warning signs that you should contact the IRS right now:
  • The Get My Payment tracking tool reports the IRS made your payment weeks ago and you haven't received it (see below).
  • You received a confirmation letter from the IRS that your payment was sent, but you didn't get the funds.
  • You think you accidentally threw your prepaid card or check in the trash (see below).
  • You suspect someone stole your check or otherwise defrauded you.
Source: What to do if your first stimulus check still hasn't arrived, including who to call

A Tidbit from Me: When you have questions we have answers! If we don’t have the answer right away we will do our best to find the answer. Always feel free to reach out when you need answers.

Sharing from Disability Rights California (DRC)
Parents say San Diego Unified mask policy discriminates against students with disabilities
The district is not allowing students on campus without a mask to prevent COVID-19 transmission, even if students have a disability or medical condition that prevents mask wearing

By KRISTEN TAKETA NOV. 12, 2020 11:40 AM

Erin Coller’s 5-year-old son, who has an intellectual disability and autism, is not allowed to go to school because he can’t wear a mask.
Cadman has sensory defensiveness, which means he is hypersensitive and overreacts to certain stimuli. He especially doesn’t tolerate anything on his head or face, not even a hat, and he rips off masks in seconds, Coller said.
Cadman’s school, Hawthorne Elementary in San Diego Unified, has invited him to come to school to work with a teacher for up to 30 minutes a week. It’s part of San Diego Unified’s Phase One reopening, which so far has provided about 3,000 students with in-person support sessions.
But his teacher and principal told Coller that Cadman can’t come indoors if he won’t wear a mask — no exceptions, Coller said. Instead they could do a socially distanced greeting in the parking lot, Coller was told.
Coller said she is desperate for Cadman to get in-person instruction because he is learning little to nothing through distance learning at home and is failing to meet the academic goals in his special education plan. Coller said she feels frustrated and helpless.
“The lack of flexibility from the school district is making a challenging situation even more difficult,” she said.
San Diego Unified’s mask policy, which does not provide in-person learning accommodations for students who are unable to wear a face covering, is raising alarm among parents and attorneys who believe the policy may violate federal laws that outline rights for people with disabilities.
“It’s blatant discrimination,” said Gabriela Torres, senior staff attorney at nonprofit Disability Rights California, who said she has received two dozen calls and emails from families since last week about the mask issue.
Source: Parents say San Diego Unified mask policy discriminates against students with disabilities

A Tidbit from Me: The issue of students with disabilities experiencing barriers in receiving Special Education Services and Supports during Covid-19 is being tracked by several organizations on the local, State, and National level. The State Council on Developmental Disabilities and the California State Independent Living Council are currently engaged on this important advocacy issue. Marin CIL has also heard from parents and families about this disparity. If you or someone in your family is experiencing barriers in receiving Special Education services please reach out to us peter@marincil.org or 415-234-3840.

Sharing a Joint Statement from the ARC of California and the United Cerebral Palsy Collaborative

Historic Voter Turnout Gives Hope to the Disability Community Sacramento, CA — While Americans anxiously await for every vote to be counted, and every voice be heard before determining the outcome of the 2020 presidential race, The Arc of California (The Arc) and the United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) collaborative is committed to working with the new Administration and newly elected members of the Congress and the California Legislature regardless of who the voters elect. “Even though it’s a very close race to the White House, we are encouraged by the historic voter turnout,” said Jordan Lindsey, Executive Director, The Arc of California. “When a record number of people get involved in our democracy, it can be a better reflection of the diversity of our citizens and ultimately shows us that people are willing to engage in advocacy to help influence the positive change they want to see in their communities. And while we don’t have the data in yet, we have reason to believe that this year more people with disabilities than ever before exercised their civil right to vote.” According to a PEW study, when all ballots are counted, the 2020 election is on track for having the highest voter turnout since the early 1900s with nearly 160 million people submitting a ballot, up from around 138 million in the 2016 election Regardless of who is elected as President, the two nonprofits who advocate for more than 500,000 Californians with developmental disabilities and their families statewide say that it’s time we come together to tackle the very real issues facing the disability community, especially during the current Coronavirus pandemic. The 2020 year has tested the disability community like none other. The individuals and families who received disability services are at higher risk for medical complications due to COVID-19, and experience deeper impacts emotionally and mentally by being isolated from their support teams and community. Their required needs for day-to-day support do not change or go away because of a public health crisis – they change and may even increase. The pandemic has resulted in the loss of more than 200,000 lives, thousands more fighting for their lives, and created the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression. But the needs of our community, including jobs, PPE, adequate pay for support staff, caregiver benefits, affordable housing, and access to support services will not go away as this community needing services continues to grow. “To address the challenges brought on by the pandemic, policy makers must work together to protect the rights and health of Californians with disabilities,” Lindsey said. “We will hold our new government accountable for making our communities more inclusive, supported and a place where everyone has the opportunity to thrive.” To get involved and advocate on behalf of an individual with a developmental disability in California, please visit TheArcCa.org
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL participates on the Marin County Elections Advisory Committee. To get involved in Marin CIL’s civic engagement initiatives including voting. Feel free to reach out to Marin CIL.


Sharing from the ARC
Special Education in Charter Schools: Policy, Challenges, Opportunities, and the Impact of COVID-19
 
Wednesday, December 9 at 2:00 p.m. ET
 
Do you want to learn about how laws and regulations apply to special education in charter schools? Join us for a free upcoming webinar on December 9.
 
This webinar will focus on special education in charter schools—specifically how federal, state, and local laws and regulations apply; the challenges that exist in these unique environments; and the ways that charter schools are working to address those challenges.
 We will also look at how COVID-19 has impacted the way charter schools approach the education of students with disabilities during these challenging times. 

 
REGISTER NOW
 
 
Sharing from California Department of Social Services
The California Department of Social Services (CDSS) is rescheduling the EVV Stakeholder Meeting that was scheduled to occur Monday, November 16th, 2020 from 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. to November 30th, 2020 from 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. 
CDSS will conduct the November 30th stakeholder meeting using Zoom Video Conferencing.  Zoom provides additional accessibility features, including closed captioning, that our current video conferencing application does not provide. 
An e-mail invitation for the November 30th meeting with details on how to register to attend is forthcoming.
We look forward to continuing our productive discussions with the stakeholder community during our next EVV Stakeholder meeting.
What is EVV?
Electronic visit verification (EVV) is an electronic-based system that collects information through a secure website, a mobile application (“app”) or a telephone. Federal law, Subsection l of Section 1903 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1396b) , requires all states to implement EVV for Medicaid-funded personal care services by January 2020 and home health care services by January 2023. States can select and implement their own EVV design. However, the EVV system must verify: type of service performed; individual receiving the service; date of the service; location of service delivery; individual providing the services and time the service begins and ends.
Which programs will be impacted by EVV in California?
EVV will impact all personal care services and home health care services provided under the state plan and various waivers. In California personal care services are delivered to eligible aged, blind and disabled individuals through multiple programs managed by California Department of Social Services (CDSS) and Department of Health Care Services (DHCS).
Most publicly-funded personal care services are managed by CDSS through the following four programs collectively known as the In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) Program:
  • Personal Care Services Program (PCSP)
  • IHSS Plus Option (IPO)
  • Community First Choice Option (CFCO)
  • IHSS Residual (IHSS-R)
DHCS and its designees (Departments of Aging, Developmental Services and Public Health) are responsible for providing oversight of personal care services provided under Medicaid Home and Community-Based Service (HCBS) programs. Impacted HCBS programs include:
  • Home and Community-Based Alternatives (HCBA) Waiver
  • In-Home Operation (IHO)
  • Pediatric Palliative Care Waiver (PPCW)
  • HIV/AIDS Waiver
  • HCBS Waiver for Californians with Developmental Disabilities
  • 1915(i) State Plan Amendment for Californians with Developmental Disabilities
  • Multipurpose Senior Services Program (MSSP)
EVV Implementation
California is implementing EVV in two phases:
  1. Phase I is focused on the IHSS and Waiver Personal Care Services (WPCS) programs that currently use the Case Management Payrolling & Information Systems (CMIPS) and Electronic Timesheet and Telephonic Timesheet Systems.
    • California plans to implement Phase I EVV over the course of the next two years or so and will seek a good faith exemption request to delay full implementation until January 1, 2021.
  2. Phase II is focused on identifying either an existing system(s) or a new system to implement EVV for non-CMIPS and agency personal care services, and self-directed and agency home health services. For more information, please visit the DHCS EVV Phase II website.
Source: CDSS: EVV

Sharing from SCDD
Dating on the Spectrum a 4 month online course for young adults 18+ JANUARY 13, 2021 Limited spaces available Sign up today!
Dating can be a fun way to get to know someone and decide if you want to keep spending time together. This four month course will take you through the different reasons why people date. Dating can lead to friendships, short-term relationships, or even long-term committed relationships. Dating does not have to have a single purpose of “finding your one true love”.
This course is designed for anyone 18 or older that is interested in starting the journey to dating. Group meets once a week with monthly group coaching sessions. To enroll and for more information visit: StarPointe Consulting at www.starpointeconsulting.com or call 916.879.0771


The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.
 

Avoid Covid-19 Rollback, Accessible Housing Victory, Project Homekey, Census, and Much More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on November 12, 2020

Good Morning my Brothers and Sisters in Community,

I hope each of you had a wonderful Veteran’s Day. Once again I want to pay homage to all the Veterans who so valiantly serve our country and remember those who paid the ultimate sacrifice in service to our Nation. This morning there is a lot going on in our world. So here we go….this PM report is for you.

County of Marin Update
VIDEO: Dr. Willis provides update to Board of Supervisors
Dr. Matt Willis provided an update on Marin’s COVID-19 response during today’s Marin County Board of Supervisor’s meeting. Topics covered include current COVID-19 case trends in Marin and across the United States; our current status on the Blueprint for a Safer Economy; New restrictions in response to increased cases across the Bay Area; holiday gathering and travel guidance; and an update on a possible COVID-19 vaccine.
WATCH ON YOUTUBE
 
Blueprint Update: Marin County remains in Tier 3
Today, California Department of Public Health (CDPH) provided its weekly update on the Blueprint for a Safer Economy, a statewide plan for reducing COVID-19 and keeping Californians healthy and safe.
CDPH confirmed Marin County’s placement in Tier 3 (orange status) for a third straight week. CDPH’s November 10 assessment for Marin County includes:

  • Testing Positivity: 1.1% (increase of .1% since last assessment)
  • Adjusted Case Rate: 2.5 (decrease of .1%)
  • Health Equity Quartile Test Positivity Rate: 1.3% (decrease of 0.1%)
The following table outlines the requirements for case rates, test positivity rates, and quartile test positivity rates for each tier status. Currently, two of Marin’s three measurements qualifies for Tier 4 (yellow status):

In general, for a County to advance to a less restrictive tier, it must (1) have been in the current tier for a minimum of three weeks; and (2) meet criteria for the next less restrictive tier for all three measures for the prior two consecutive weeks in order to progress to the next tier.
Source: Marin County Coronovirus Information



Sharing From CDCAN:
HOUSING: PROPOSED CHANGES TO REDUCE NUMBER OF REQUIRED ACCESSIBLE UNITS WITHDRAWN BY CALIFORNIA TAX CREDIT ALLOCATION COMMITTEE - STAFF CITES IMPACT OF NUMEROUS PUBLIC COMMENTS MADE NOV 10TH OPPOSING THE CHANGE

SACRAMENTO, CA [BY MARTY OMOTO, CDCAN LAST UPDATED  11/11/2020 01:15 AM] - The California Tax Credit Allocation Committee (TCAC), under the State Treasurer's office, announced Tuesday early evening (November 10th) that it has withdrawn the controversial proposed changes that would have reduced the number of required accessible units for housing developments for people with disabilities (including developmental), the blind and seniors. 
    Committee staff cited "numerous" public comments made at its committee yesterday *November 10th) strongly opposing the proposed changes.  The committee also revised the proposal to increase accessibility requirements to 15% in new construction. [California Tax Credit Allocation Committee logo pictured left].
    Advocates argued that the change would have resulted in a significant reduction in the development of critically needed accessible housing for people with disabilities - including developmental - the blind, and seniors, at a time of a worldwide pandemic and a major recession in the State.  
    The action was a major victory for disability and senior advocates who praised the committee staff for responding to the public comments made during the November 10th public meeting - all which opposed the proposed changes that would have reduced the number of required accessible units.  
    In the revised 64 page proposed regulations released early Tuesday evening (November 10th), the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee noted that "Please note that TCAC [Tax Credit Allocation Committee] staff has revised Sections 10325(f)(7)(K) and 10325(g)(2) on pages 41 and 44 as follows. After numerous public comments received at the November 10 public hearing, staff is withdrawing the originally proposed change
to reduce the number of accessible units, and for Section 10325(f)(7)(K) is now proposing to increase the required number of accessible units."

    Over 120 statewide and local disability and senior advocacy organizations and individual advocates participated in the over three hour public hearing and made comments opposing the proposed changes, including Disability Rights California (DRC), State Council on Developmental Disabilities (SCDD), Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund (DREDF), Western Center on Law and Poverty, San Francisco Gray Panthers, California Gray Panthers, Communities Actively Living Independent & Free (CALIF), Resources for Independent Living Sacramento, CHANCE Housing (Coalition for Housing Accessibility, Needs, Choices & Equality) of Santa Barbara, Autism Society of California, CDCAN (California Disability-Senior Community Action Network), California Council of the Blind, individual disability and senior rights advocates including Zak Karnazes, Connie Arnold, Nicki Diaz, Walter Park, Sheela Gun Cushman, HolLynn D'Lil, William Pavao (former chair of the committtee) and many others.
    Judith Blackwell, Executive Director of the committee, said near the end of the public comments, that she and the staff would consider the concerns made - a response that was praised by advocates that result in the withdrawal of the proposed changes. 
    Advocacy organizations, including Disability Rights California, urge advocates to follow-up the action by the committee staff in withdrawing the proposed changes, with letters to the committee (see separate CDCAN Alert).
    The California Tax Credit Allocation Committee (CTCAC) administers the federal and state Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Programs. Both programs were created to promote private investment in affordable rental housing for low-income Californians.
    Here are the links, compiled by CDCAN, to the latest information regarding the proposed regulation changes as revised November 10, 2020:

CALIFORNIA TAX CREDIT ALLOCATION COMMITTEE
REGULATIONS - QUALIFIED ALLOCATION PLAN
PROPOSED 2020 REGULATION CHANGES  WITH STATEMENT OF REASONS
Proposed Regulations Issued October 29, 2020 - Revised November 10, 2020
Note from committee staff: Please note that TCAC [Tax Credit Allocation Committee] staff has revised Sections 10325(f)(7)(K) and 10325(g)(2) on pages 41 and 44. After numerous public comments received at the November 10 public hearing, staff is withdrawing the originally proposed change to reduce the number of accessible units, and for Section 10325(f)(7)(K) is now proposing to increase the required number of accessible units. - PDF Document (64 pages):
https://www.treasurer.ca.gov/ctcac/programreg/2020/20201029/proposed-changes-with-reasons.pdf
California Tax Credit Allocation Committee Regulations Webpage: 
https://www.treasurer.ca.gov/ctcac/programreg/regulations.asp
California Tax Credit Allocation Committee - Program Overview - PDF Document (3 pages):
https://www.treasurer.ca.gov/ctcac/program.pdf

   CDCAN NOTE: To receive the free CDCAN Reports, send email request to Marty Omoto (with "CDCAN Reports Subscribe" in the subject line) to: martyomoto@att.net

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal

Marin’s overall census response improves despite challenges
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: November 11, 2020 at 4:13 p.m. | UPDATED: November 11, 2020 at 7:06 p.m.
The rate at which Marin residents self-reported data for the 2020 census improved by more than 4 percentage points over the 2010 survey, according to local organizers.
“Overall, I’m really pleased, especially given all the challenges with the census: the pandemic, wildfires, social justice protests and some of the Trump administration’s actions,” said Stephanie McNally, a Canal Alliance manager who directed Marin’s census outreach efforts.
The overall county rate was 76.30%, up from 72.10% a decade earlier. Nevertheless, self-response rates declined in seven of 11 Marin census tracts that the state identified as being hard to count. Two of those tracts are in San Rafael’s predominantly Latino Canal neighborhood.
“I do believe a big part of that was COVID,” McNally said.
Source: Marin’s overall census response improves despite challenges

A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL payed an active role in supporting Census efforts in Marin County. In March 2020, Marin CIL partnering with the Marin Complete Count Committee and the California Foundation of Independent Living Centers opened a virtual Questionnaire Assistance Center. The Questionnaire Assistance Center was available to answer questions about completing the U.S. Census and educate people with disabilities and older adults about the importance of completing the census. Marin CIL’s Census Hotline was open through October 15th, 2020 which was the last day the public could participate in the Census.

Marin supervisors approve building purchases for homeless
By RICHARD HALSTEAD | rhalstead@marinij.com and WILL HOUSTON | whouston@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: November 10, 2020 at 5:55 p.m. | UPDATED: November 11, 2020 at 7:16 a.m.
Marin County supervisors approved plans to buy two properties to house the homeless, but scuttled a similar effort in Novato.
The board signed off Tuesday on a $4.1 million deal for a hotel at 1591 Casa Buena Drive in Corte Madera and a $7.2 million deal for an office building at 3301 Kerner Blvd. in San Rafael. The acquisitions are intended to provide 62 apartments for the homeless.
The supervisors then met in closed session and emerged to announce they had dropped a proposal to buy the 70-room Inn Marin and Suites at 250 Entrada Drive in Ignacio. The state would have picked up two-thirds of the cost under its Project Homekey initiative.
………(In Relevant Part)
The Marin Community Foundation has pledged $500,000 to assist in the purchase of the Corte Madera property. The San Rafael City Council approved a $1.54 million grant to help pay for the San Rafael building. San Rafael’s contribution comes from the city’s affordable housing trust fund.
The state’s Homekey program is a spinoff of its Project Roomkey, which paid for counties to lease hotel rooms to temporarily shelter the homeless during the coronavirus pandemic.
The county used three motels in Marin for this purpose. Now, as the program winds down, Homeward Bound of Marin is working with the county to find permanent housing for the people who were sheltered in the motels.

Complete Article Available: Marin supervisors approve building purchases for homeless

A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL, together with the Marin Organizing Committee and Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California as well as other community members, testified in support of Project Homekey at this weeks Board of Supervisors Meeting. Marin CIL is recognized as one of the key safety-net agencies providing advocacy and support service to people with disabilities and older adults in Marin. One of our signature services is housing support. Marin CIL assists our community members in locating accessible and affordable housing, along with housing retention, and advocacy. The high cost of housing, together with the lack of accessible and affordable housing, significantly impacts the communities we serve every day. Initiatives that support accessible, affordable housing truly benefit our communities.

Marin County restaurants advised to reduce number of indoor dining customers
By Debora Villalon Published 1 hour ago Coronavirus in the Bay Area KTVU FOX 2
NOVATO, Calif. - Marin County restaurants are being advised to immediately reduce indoor dining from 50% to 25% of occupancy. 
That's due to surging COVID-19 case numbers that could threaten the county's status.    
On average, Marin County was seeing about 9 new cases daily, but during the past week, that rate more than doubled.
"We're all seeing a very clear second wave emerging," said Public Health Officer Dr. Matt Willis, addressing the Marin County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday.
Such spikes, in the Bay Area and across the state, are causing health departments to freeze or reverse some of their reopening progress.
"If Dr. Willis thinks that's a good idea, we're happy to do that, go back to 25 percent, as long as we can stay there," said Peter Schumacher, owner of the Buckeye Roadhouse Restaurant in Mill Valley. "Anything to keep from going to purple tier again, that would be just terrible." 
California's purple tier bans all indoor dining.
Source: Marin County restaurants advised to reduce number of indoor dining customers

A Tidbit from Me: Wearing a mask, social distancing, and adhering to other Covid-19 protocols is so important to me. Most of you know I am a person with a severe disability. What you may not know is that I have a few other health conditions which make me uniquely susceptible to respiratory conditions including Covid-19. The majority of the people who have passed away in Marin County have come from Residential Care and Skilled Nursing Facilities. In the Independent Living movement these valued community members are considered our Brothers and Sisters.
 Additionally, I feel for the business community. Many friends of mine have had to close or significantly alter their business model causing significant financial hardship to both owners and employees. In order to stop the spread of Covid-19 we must all do our part by wearing a mask and following other social distancing guidelines as a matter of public safety…which is everyone’s responsibility.

Sharing from California State Rehabilitation Council

Showcase of American Indian
Vocational Rehabilitation Services Programs

Please join in the VR100 webinar as the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) celebrates the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services (AIVRS) programs and their rich history in providing cultural VR services to American Indian and Alaska Native people with disabilities. The upcoming webinar, led by AIVRS program staff and state vocational rehabilitation (VR) representatives, is one in a series of the RSA hosted VR100 webinar series.
Registration information is here on this event scheduled for:
November 19, 2020
2:00 – 4:00 pm EST

The presentation topics include: Traditional Healing, Transitioning from Traditional Healing to Employment, Creative Collaborations Leading to Employment Outcomes, Non-Traditional Employment Outcomes in Rural and Remote Areas, AIVRS Program Continuity and Impact in the Days of COVID-19, and Suggestions for State VR/Tribal VR Project Collaboration.
Throughout the webinar, AIVRS success stories will be highlighted focusing on the unique successes experienced by eligible clients/consumers in obtaining, maintaining, and/or preparing for integrated community employment.
This webinar will be moderated by RSA AIVRS Project Officer August Martin and will include both live and prerecorded elements. The presenters include:
  • Mark Schultz, RSA Commissioner
  • Corrine Weidenthal, Chief Service Programs Unit, RSA/OSERS
  • Laura Maudsley, Director, and Dr. Beth Boland, Assistant Director, Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation (TVR) Institute at Northwest Indian College
  • Esther Littlewolf, VR Counselor, Chief Dull Knife College VR for the Northern Cheyenne Tribe
  • Celeste Hunt, Program Director, Lumbee Tribal VR
  • Laurae MacClain, Program Director, Confederated Tribes of Colville VR
  • Paula Seanez, Director, Navajo Nation OSERS
  • Jon Ringlero, Tribal Liaison, Oklahoma State VR
  • Mariah Krueger, Chief of Services, Alaska DVR
  • Gwen Sargent, Program Director, Kodiak Area Native Association VR Program
  • Elmer Guy, President, Navajo Technical University
Register today to get a personalized meeting link and to add the event to your calendar!

Sharing from CNET
Stimulus checks, SSI, SSDI: Important details about the first and second payments
Can SSI and SSDI recipients qualify for another stimulus payment? We'll tell you how to file, and what to do if you never got the first check.
Alison DeNisco RayomeShelby Brown
Nov. 12, 2020 2:00 a.m. PT
The negotiations to pass another coronavirus rescue package continue, and there's still hope that a second stimulus check will bring money to qualifying people before 2021.
While many people won't be eligible to get a second stimulus check, it's likely that Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability Insurance recipients will meet the qualifications to get paid -- though it's unclear how much anyone will get.
Read moreJoe Biden is president-elect. Here's his stimulus plan for the US
If you didn't get the first stimulus payment and participate in the SSI or SSDI programs, you have until 12 p.m. PT (3 p.m. ET) on Nov. 21 to file a claim for yourself or your child dependents. Keep reading for more details about stimulus checks for SSI and SSDI recipients. We recently updated this story.

Source: Stimulus checks, SSI, SSDI: Important details about the first and second payments

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Veterans Day, Project Homekey, ACA at the Supreme Court, Equity Committee, Job Opening at ACL, More


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on November 10, 2020

Good Morning my Brothers in Sisters in Community,

Today there is a lot going on. It was a two coffee morning for me. I want to start out with a special note to Veterans from Marin CIL. 

Marin CIL would like to take a moment as we get ready to celebrate Veteran’s Day. Members of the Armed Forces have given so much to our Nation including those who have given their lives in service. We would not have many of the freedoms or rights that we have today without their service. We would also like to honor Veterans who are members of the Marin CIL family. There are over 5.2 million Veterans with disabilities living in the United States. Marin CIL serves all people with disabilities including Veterans. If you are a Veteran and believe that you may benefit from Marin CIL’s programs and services feel free to reach out to us. We are here for you. In honor of Veteran’s Day Marin CIL will be closed and the PM Report will take a pause and return on Thursday.

There's quite a bit happening today so let's jump right in!


County of Marin Update

Public Health Emphasizes Safe Holidays and Travel
Today, public health officers from the counties of Marin, Alameda, Contra Costa, Monterey, Napa, San Mateo, San Francisco, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, and Sonoma, and the city of Berkeley have issued joint recommendations for staying safe during the holidays. The recommendations cover gatherings and travel, with recommended steps to reduce risk during the COVID-19 pandemic.
The joint recommendations for travel and gatherings advise that in-person gatherings be small, short, stable (no more than three households over an extended period), and outdoors. Also, nonessential travel, including holiday travel, is not recommended. Travel outside the Bay Area will increase chances of infection and potentially spread the virus. For those who are traveling, there are tips to help avoid catching COVID-19 or spreading it to fellow travelers. Those travelling outside the Bay Area are strongly recommended to self-quarantine for 14 days upon return if activities while travelling created higher risk of getting COVID-19. 
Marin County Public Health Officer Dr. Matt Willis said family and friends who plan to travel to a holiday gathering should consider being tested for COVID-19 before and after the gatherings. He said it’s more important than ever to practice the usual precautions, such as a wearing a face covering, washing hands frequently, avoidance of touching surfaces and other people, using hand sanitizer often, and maintaining a minimum of six feet from others.
“Marin residents considering travel should know that COVID-19 rates are high in many regions across the county, and not everyone around you will always be taking the right precautions,” Willis said. “Keep doing the things you’re doing to protect yourself and others, even if the people are around you are not.”
Marin has seen relatively low COVID-19 rates recently despite increases around the state and across the country, he said. On October 27, Marin was moved up on the State of California’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy scale from Tier 2 (substantial risk) to Tier 3 (moderate risk) because of its public health successes in suppressing the novel coronavirus.
“We’ve worked hard to achieve our gains, but we’re seeing increases in cases regionally and could easily backslide if we import the virus back into our homes,” Willis said.
Cases are rising around the country and are beginning to increase here in the Bay Area as well.  When people who live in different houses or apartments are together at the same time in the same space, risk of COVID-19 spreading goes up, even when the people are relatives or friends. Please celebrate safely this year and protect yourself and your family by including masks, keeping a distance, and staying outdoors.
The safest way to celebrate this holiday season is virtually or with members of your household. Gathering with people outside your household – even extended family – increases the risk of getting and spreading COVID-19. There are many ways to enjoy the holidays with loved ones without gathering:

  • Enjoy holiday traditions at home with your household
  • Decorate your home and/or yard
  • Share a virtual meal with family and friends
  • Host online parties and/or contests
  • Prepare meals using traditional recipes and deliver to family and neighbors
  • Attend holiday movie nights at drive-in venues
  • Visit holiday-themed outdoor art installations
  • Participate in drive-by events where everyone stays in their vehicles
Marin County Public Health’s guidance for holiday travel and gatherings, in addition a list of safe alternatives for holiday celebrations, can be found at Coronavirus.MarinHHS.org/Celebrate-Safely.
 

Sharing from the Marin Independent Journal

Perry’s Delicatessen, a San Rafael fixture, changes hands
By ADRIAN RODRIGUEZ | arodriguez@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: November 9, 2020 at 3:22 p.m. | UPDATED: November 10, 2020 at 7:02 a.m.
After 62 years of serving sandwiches, the family behind Perry’s Delicatessen in downtown San Rafael has said an emotional goodbye.
Teresa Schilling Barrett, who took the helm of the business at 909 Lincoln Ave. in 1981, recently closed the shop for the last time, handing over keys to new owners who plan to reopen in early 2021.
“I didn’t think it was going to be that hard,” said Barrett, who worked her last shift Oct. 31.

The occasion was marked by visits from friends, many longtime customers and her father, Bob Schilling, the head of the family who made it possible for the Perry’s legacy to continue so long, Barrett said.
Source: Perry’s Delicatessen, a San Rafael fixture, changes hands
A Tidbit from me: Perry’s was a favorite place for Marin CIL staff. Teresa, Katie, and the entire Perry’s team were always so friendly and welcoming. I remember in the 1980’s when Golden Gate Transit started rolling out accessible busses I travelled from my apartment in Novato to Downtown San Rafael. The transit center was at 4th and Heatherton back in the day. One of the first places I went to lunch was Perry’s Deli. My lunch order then and now was a Roast Beef Sandwich with chips and a coke and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups for dessert. The staff was always very willing to cut my sandwich in to quarters. They understood my access needs and were always happy to assist. The customer service was always stellar. I will miss Teresa, Katie, and the entire team very much.

Mill Valley social equity committee holds 1st meeting
By LORENZO MOROTTI | lmorotti@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: November 9, 2020 at 5:07 p.m. | UPDATED: November 10, 2020 at 7:03 a.m.
Police reform, low-income housing, inequity in local sports and representation of people of color were just a few of the themes that emerged from the first meeting of Mill Valley’s “diversity, equity and inclusion” committee
The panel, which met Thursday, was created in June in response to a community outcry over a statement by Mayor Sashi McEntee, who in a public meeting said the Black Lives Matter movement was “not of immediate local importance.”
Some, such as resident Caroline Robinson, are advocating the advisory group become a permanent commission.
“The last thing is having a long-term commission to vote,” Robinson said. “I really think that’s essential.”
Committee chair Naima Dean said the 22-member panel is only just beginning its work, taking community feedback and preparing a list recommendations.
“We hope to resolve some of the long-standing issues in Mill Valley, and in this county,” Dean said. “We are doing it little by little and this task force is that first step. None of us know where it’s going.”
The group will hold a second online public meeting on Thursday before sending its recommendations to the City Council on Nov. 24.
“We will review the milestones, timeline and incorporate comments from this meeting into our framework,” Dean said. “The working groups will complete their recommendations.”
The committee is separated into groups that focus on solutions to increase equity, diversity and inclusion in areas such as education, policing, community services, the economy, housing, the panel’s scope and the City Council, said Elspeth Mathau, the panel’s co-chair.
Source: Mill Valley social equity committee holds 1st meeting

Coronavirus: California’s rates rise amid nationwide spike
By EVAN WEBECK and JOHN WOOLFOLK |
PUBLISHED: November 9, 2020 at 8:09 p.m. | UPDATED: November 9, 2020 at 8:14 p.m.

Amid a dramatic spike in cases of COVID-19 nationally, California and Bay Area health officials sounded the alarm Monday after seeing signs of the virus re-emerging across the state.
As the U.S. topped 10 million cases, California officials reported 7,212 new cases Sunday, more than twice the 2,981 from two weeks earlier on Oct. 25. The state’s average 14-day case positivity rate climbed to 3.7% from 2.5% on Oct. 19.
“Obviously it’s raised some alarm and raised some concern,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said in his Monday news briefing, adding that after two months of subsiding cases and reopening progress in much of the state, he expects several counties to regress to more restrictions.
In the Bay Area, several counties were reporting increases in cases. The most populous county, Santa Clara, recorded 358 new COVID-19 cases Sunday, second only to the record 385 new cases reported on July 15. Hospitalizations were up by nearly 10 percent. And officials feared they could be bumped from the orange to the more-restrictive redreopening tier if that continues.
“Our case counts in Santa Clara County are starting to surge — our patterns are starting to look like the rest of the country, the state and our region,” Santa Clara County Health Officer Dr. Sara Cody said at a Monday news conference. “Over October we began to drift up. It is no longer a drift. We are trending ourselves right into the red and perhaps the purple tier in the state’s restrictions.”
Source: Coronavirus: California’s rates rise amid nationwide spike

Sharing from
Information Alert: Affordable Care Act Heads Back to Supreme Court Today
Today the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the lawsuit seeking to invalidate the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This case, California vs. Texas, argues that the ACA’s individual mandate is unconstitutional and puts the entire ACA in jeopardy of being struck down.
NCIL is closely following this. The ACA has been vital to millions of people across the country, including the disability community. Because of that, NCIL has consistently fought efforts to weaken and get rid of the ACA. NCIL, along with nearly 20 other national disability rights organizations, filed an amicus brief opposing these efforts to invalidate the ACA. In it, we argued how the ACA has expanded healthcare access and coverage for people with disabilities and society as a whole, including how the ACA’s changes to Medicaid have increased and improved access to healthcare and long term services and supports (LTSS). View the amicus brief (PDF).
Striking down the ACA would be devastating, especially for people with disabilities. And the thought of taking healthcare away from millions of people is even more unconscionable as we deal with the devastation resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. That said, we do not expect to have a ruling for several months, and we plan to continue fighting. We will continue updating you with information as it becomes available, as well as ways that you can take action. 
In the meantime, you can follow some of the today’s action and join in on social media with the hashtags #ProtectOurCare and #SaveTheACA. Additionally we have extended our deadline to share your stories about how the ACA has helped you or how overturning the ACA would be harmful. Please share your stories with by using this online form or emailing comments@ncil.org. We are extending the deadline for this request to Sunday, November 15, 2020
See our previous alert for information about some of the ways the ACA has helped people.

A Tidbit from Me: Many disability advocacy groups are concerned that declaring the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional would remove protections for people with disabilities who have pre-existing conditions. In the National Council on Independent Living’s amicus brief it talks about how the ACA expands access to healthcare for people with disabilities who have historically experienced significant barriers to accessing healthcare. NCIL is concerned that declaring the ACA unconstitutional may force our communities to once again face barriers in accessing healthcare services and may lead to the institutionalization of our communities.  “It (ACA) guarantees coverage of services for mental illnesses and developmental disabilities. It provides access to long-term, home-based health care, which can mean the difference between institutionalization and independence to people .with disabilities. And it expressly precludes discrimination in access to healthcare.” NCIL argues that even if the individual mandate provision of the Affordable Care Act is found to be unconstitutional the rest of the act should remain in effect.

Sharing from the California SILC

The Office of Independent Living Programs (OILP) is hiring a program officer for the OILP Team! The OILP intends to fill this position with the Schedule A hiring authority.  This means you must be a person with a disability to apply for the current opening.  Information about the Schedule A hiring authority can be found here: https://www.opm.gov/policy-data-oversight/disability-employment/hiring/#url=Overview .
 
This is a full time position located in WA DC.  Relocation expenses are NOT provided.  Due to COVID-19 all OILP staff are currently teleworking from their approved WA DC metro area telework locations.  ACL anticipates it will resume pre-COVID duty stations and telework agreements at some point in the future.   
 
This position includes end-to-end management of Centers for Independent Living grant awards, opportunities to develop program guidance and national disability policy, and participation on federal workgroups driving issues important to people with disabilities.  Bring your State experience to Federal government and directly contribute to the exciting future of independent living programs!
 
Please follow the below instructions:
 
  1. Email Corinna Stiles at Corinna.stiles@acl.hhs.gov (no phone calls).
  2. The email should include (1) a short statement of interest, (2) acknowledgment of Schedule A eligibility, and (3) a current resume that reflects experience or working knowledge in the Centers for Independent Living program, the Independent Living Services program, and/or any other work that highlights experience in disability services or policy.
  3. To be considered the email must be received no later than 5:00pm EST Sunday November 15, 2020.
  4. To be considered you must follow instructions 1-3.
 
Individuals of interest will receive follow up information the week of November 16.

Advocacy Opportunity! Sharing from yesterday’s PM Report: Meeting Today

Actions: Speak up for Project Homekey!
In the next 2 weeks, the County of Marin will be deciding whether to accept $20M of Project Homekey state funding to redevelop three sites for supportive housing in Marin. Long-term, these projects would together create almost 140 new units of permanent supportive housing, with critically important, immediately available interim housing for Marin's unsheltered community members.
 
At recent community meetings for these projects, speakers have voiced opposition to having these homes in our communities (“Novato residents blast County plan …” and “Corte Madera residents vent …”). These projects are far from approved, and Supervisor Arnold has already called for the county withdraw from the purchase of the site in Novato.
 
Despite allegations that these projects will bring crime and other problems, over 90% of the people housed through these programs are still housed, and we’ve seen massive reductions in healthcare and criminal justice utilization once people get inside. Housing is medicine.
Check out how you can participate, let me know if you want to get involved or have any questions, and feel free to use any of the talking points below in your comments...
 
What you can do…
1.   Speak at Public Comment at a Board of Supervisors Hearing
a.             November 10th @9am: Corte Madera and San Rafael
b.             November 17th @9am: Novato
To participate:
Join by phone: Dial: (669) 900-6833 and enter Meeting ID: 947 4251 8384 # and Password: 352533 #
Press *9 to inform the moderator that you would like to comment.
Join by computer or mobile: Visit www.zoom.us/join and enter Meeting ID: 947 4251 8384 and Password: 352533
Use the "Raise Hand" button to inform the moderator that you would like to comment.    
 
2.             Can’t attend? Write your Supervisorsbos@marincounty.org, before November 9th!
 
3.             Email your city that you support Project Homekey if you live in...
a.             Corte Madera: America’s Best Value Inn at 1595 Casa Buena Drive- rvaughn@tcmmail.org
b.             Novato: 250 Entrada Drive- novatocouncil@novato.org
 
HOMEKEY TALKING POINTS
 
There are many logical arguments for why these projects make sense for our community:
 
  • We have a track record of success. These sites accelerate the success of our Coordinated Entry System, which has housed nearly 300 of our community’s most vulnerable, chronically homeless people over the last three years.
  • Despite allegations that these projects will bring crime and other problems, over 90% of the people we have housed are still housed, and we’ve seen massive reductions in healthcare and criminal justice utilization once people get inside. Housing is medicine.
  • Property values do not decline, especially in Marin, when they are near affordable housing.
  • If we don’t move on these projects, we miss out on tens of millions of dollars in State funding.
  • This program is an effort to prevent the spread of COVID-19 among our most vulnerable residents. We’re in a healthcare crisis.
  • In a community that doesn’t want to build more housing or develop in the open space, all three projects are rehabbing existing sites.
 
Despite all of these rational positives, the most compelling public comments to-date have been heartfelt appeals to just do the right thing, for our leaders to live up to our community’s stated values:
 
  • We are progressive, and being progressive means saying “yes in my backyard”.
  • We are compassionate, and these are our children, our family members, our friends, our workforce, and our classmates living on the streets.
  • We stand for equity, and in a county where Black residents are 400% more likely to experience homelessness than white residents, housing is racial justice.
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL, joining with the Marin Aging Action Initiative, the Marin Organizing Committee, the Marin Environmental Collaborative, and community members experiencing housing access barriers testified in support of Project Homekey. As I mentioned in yesterday’s PM Morning Report people with disabilities, Black, Indigenous, People of Color, and Immigrant communities historically experience barriers in securing affordable and accessible housing. Feel free to reach out to Marin CIL to learn more and to join our advocacy activities to expand the availability of affordable and accessible housing in Marin and beyond

The goal of the PM Report is to share information that is relevant and meaningful to our communities in support of enhancing full participation through community engagement and advocacy opportunities. Please feel free to send Peter Mendoza (Marin CIL's Director of Advocacy and Special Projects) any announcements or updates that you feel would be beneficial to our communities. To get involved in Marin CILs advocacy opportunities or if you have any questions or comments please feel free to reach out to Peter at: peter@marincil.org or (415) 234-3840.

Wishing everyone the very best today.

Glass Ceiling Comes Tumbling Down, CalABLE, Housing, Advocacy, Autonomous Vehicles, and More!


Photo of Peter Mendoza.

by Peter Mendoza Posted on November 9, 2020

Good Morning my Brother and Sisters in Community,

Alot to cover! This past Saturday morning several media outlets reported that President Trump received 214 electoral votes while former Vice-President Biden and Senator Harris received 279 electoral votes declaring former Vice President Biden and Senator Harris the winners of the 2020 Presidential election. This is a historical moment in our country’s history. Part of the glass ceiling came tumbling down. Vice-President elect Kamala Harris is now the first woman and first person to identify as Black and as South Asian-American in the role of vice president. Vice-President elect Harris has deep Bay Area roots. She grew up in Oakland and served as San Francisco district attorney before going on to become attorney general of the state — she was also the first African-American to serve in that role. This election has particular meaning because this year is the hundredth year anniversary of the 19th amendment which granted women the right to vote. It is the 55th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act which aimed to overcome legal barriers at the state and local levels that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote under the Fifteenth Amendment (1870) to the Constitution of the United States.


Georgia runoff elections will determine control of US Senate: How we got here
Josh Peter USA TODAY
The outcome in several contested states will determine whether Joe Biden defeats President Donald Trump. But if the former vice president wins, the ambitions of a Biden presidency could well come down to Georgia.
With control of the U.S. Senate hanging in the balance, the two Senate races in the Peach State are headed for a possible runoff election.
The runoffs will mean a campaign on an almost national scale, with tens of millions of dollars spent by both sides.
Biden has been quiet on the Senate balance as he awaits the results in his own election.
Here’s what to know:
What's a runoff election?
They're second elections held if no candidate in the first election receives a majority of the votes. The two candidates with the most votes qualify for the runoff.
For Full article: Georgia runoff elections will determine control of US Senate: How we got here



Sharing from CalABLE
CalABLE is a savings and investment plan offered by the state of California to individuals with disabilities.
Eligible individuals, family, friends and employers can contribute up to $15,000 a year without affecting the account beneficiary's public disability benefits. CalABLE account owners who work can contribute even more to their accounts. Best of all, earnings on qualified withdrawals from a CalABLE account are federal and California state tax-free.
Individuals with a disability that occurred before age 26 are eligible to open a CalABLE account.

November 5, 2020
The agenda for the November meeting of the California ABLE Act Board is now available at https://www.treasurer.ca.gov/able/meeting/2020/20201117/agenda.pdf.
Meeting details are as follows:
When: Tuesday, November 17, 2020 at 1:30 p.m.
Where: 915 Capitol Mall, Conference Room 587, Sacramento, CA 95814
Call In: Public Participation Call-In Number (877) 810-9415, Access Code: 6535126
Online: Public Participation is also available via Zoom at https://zoom.us/j/96621404983
There will be an opportunity for public comment before the end of each agenda item. Public comments on each agenda item should address items relevant to that item; please hold comments on other topics until the public comment period before adjournment of the meeting.
If you have any questions, please contact us at calable@treasurer.ca.gov.  

Sincerely,
CalABLE Staff

Sharing from the San Francisco Housing Action Coalition

Housing and Homelessness in Marin (for young people!)
Sunday, November 8th 2-3pm Co Hosted with Marin Antiracist Coalition

Are you, or do you know any young people who could learn more about housing in Marin?
With two pivotal hearings at the county level coming up on supportive housing for Marin’s most vulnerable residents, it is hugely important to get people across Marin involved in housing and homelessness issues. Yet, strong educational barriers to understand housing issues and institutional barriers to show up at local hearings mean that young people have largely been absent in conversations on housing and homelessness in spite of the large impact of housing issues on our community.

With short presentations on housing, homelessness, and how to give an effective public comment, we will bridge the gap between future generations of Marin and the meetings where decisions are being made right now. At the end, you can put these skills to work by writing a letter in support or speaking at a hearing for Project Homekey proposed homes!

What IS Affordable Housing?
Tuesday, November 17th 5-6:30pm Co-Hosted with Housing Crisis Action Marin

Join us for a workshop and panel to delve into rich conversations about the state of affordable housing and the work being done to make Marin more affordable. Our workshop will explore how people of different incomes and backgrounds afford housing in Marin. The panel will feature the diverse perspectives of individuals who produce, protect, and preserve housing in Marin and how we can make our county’s housing more attainable moving forward.
Actions: Speak up for Project Homekey!
In the next 2 weeks, the County of Marin will be deciding whether to accept $20M of Project Homekey state funding to redevelop three sites for supportive housing in Marin. Long-term, these projects would together create almost 140 new units of permanent supportive housing, with critically important, immediately available interim housing for Marin's unsheltered community members.

At recent community meetings for these projects, speakers have voiced opposition to having these homes in our communities (“Novato residents blast County plan …” and “Corte Madera residents vent …”). These projects are far from approved, and Supervisor Arnold has already called for the county withdraw from the purchase of the site in Novato.

Despite allegations that these projects will bring crime and other problems, over 90% of the people housed through these programs are still housed, and we’ve seen massive reductions in healthcare and criminal justice utilization once people get inside. Housing is medicine.
Check out how you can participate, let me know if you want to get involved or have any questions, and feel free to use any of the talking points below in your comments...

What you can do…

  1. Speak at Public Comment at a Board of Supervisors Hearing
    1. November 10th @9am: Corte Madera and San Rafael
    2. November 17th @9am: Novato
To participate:
Join by phone: Dial: (669) 900-6833 and enter Meeting ID: 947 4251 8384 # and Password: 352533 #
Press *9 to inform the moderator that you would like to comment.
Join by computer or mobile: Visit www.zoom.us/join and enter Meeting ID: 947 4251 8384 and Password: 352533
Use the "Raise Hand" button to inform the moderator that you would like to comment.    
 
  1. Can’t attend? Write your Supervisors, bos@marincounty.org, before November 9th!
 
  1. Email your city that you support Project Homekey if you live in...
    1. Corte Madera: America’s Best Value Inn at 1595 Casa Buena Drive- rvaughn@tcmmail.org
    2. Novato: 250 Entrada Drive- novatocouncil@novato.org

HOMEKEY TALKING POINTS
 
There are many logical arguments for why these projects make sense for our community:
 
  • We have a track record of success. These sites accelerate the success of our Coordinated Entry System, which has housed nearly 300 of our community’s most vulnerable, chronically homeless people over the last three years.
  • Despite allegations that these projects will bring crime and other problems, over 90% of the people we have housed are still housed, and we’ve seen massive reductions in healthcare and criminal justice utilization once people get inside. Housing is medicine.
  • Property values do not decline, especially in Marin, when they are near affordable housing.
  • If we don’t move on these projects, we miss out on tens of millions of dollars in State funding.
  • This program is an effort to prevent the spread of COVID-19 among our most vulnerable residents. We’re in a healthcare crisis.
  • In a community that doesn’t want to build more housing or develop in the open space, all three projects are rehabbing existing sites.
 
Despite all of these rational positives, the most compelling public comments to-date have been heartfelt appeals to just do the right thing, for our leaders to live up to our community’s stated values:
 
  • We are progressive, and being progressive means saying “yes in my backyard”.
  • We are compassionate, and these are our children, our family members, our friends, our workforce, and our classmates living on the streets.
  • We stand for equity, and in a county where Black residents are 400% more likely to experience homelessness than white residents, housing is racial justice.
A Tidbit from Me: Marin CIL, joining with the Marin Aging Action Initiative, the Marin Organizing Committee, the Marin Environmental Collaborative, and community members experiencing housing access barriers testified in support of Project Homekey. As I mentioned in yesterday’s PM Morning Report people with disabilities, Black, Indigenous, People of Color, and Immigrant communities historically experience barriers in securing affordable and accessible housing. Feel free to reach out to Marin CIL to learn more and to join our advocacy activities to expand the availability of affordable and accessible housing in Marin and beyond

New Marin progressives build political traction

By LORENZO MOROTTI | lmorotti@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal
PUBLISHED: November 8, 2020 at 2:29 p.m. UPDATED: November 8, 2020 at 2:31 p.m.
Win or lose, new progressive candidates in Marin County are proving that people need not bow to traditional politics to make a difference for marginalized communities.
San Rafael resident Samantha Ramirez, a youth educator, entered the political limelight when she began fighting to curtail Immigration and Customs Enforcement operations in Marin. This year, with a few choice profanities, she criticized the Board of Supervisors for rejecting a “sanctuary county” ordinance.
While receiving pushback for her remarks, she is unapologetic about speaking her truth of what it was like to grow up amid Marin’s racial inequities as a daughter of immigrants from El Salvador and Honduras.

“There is a huge disconnect,” said Ramirez, 31, who ran for the Area 1 seat on San Rafael Board of Education this fall. “So I turned that anger and frustration into something positive and decided to run.
“For me there is a huge need for representation,” she said. “There is a need for people with different experiences, skin color and backgrounds that need to be represented in leadership spaces.”
Galvanized by passion, a handful of like-minded candidates fanned out across Marin to run on progressive platforms in the Nov. 3 election.
Those who won were Fairfax City Council candidate Chance Cutrano, 27; Sausalito Marin City School District candidate Lisa Bennett, 58; Sausalito City Council candidate Janelle Kellman, 47; and Marin County Board of Education candidate Felicia Agrelius, 25.

Source: New Marin progressives build political traction

Sharing from Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund

Comments on Proposed Decision of California PUC Commissioner Shiroma Authorizing Deployment of Autonomous Vehicle Passenger Service
November 2, 2020
Marybel Batjer, President
Liane M. Randolph, Commissioner
Martha Guzman Aceves, Commissioner
Clifford Rechtschaffen, Commissioner
Genevieve Shiroma, Commissioner
Public Utilities Commission
505 Van Ness Avenue
San Francisco, Ca 94102-3298
RE:      Proceeding 12-12-011, Proposed Decision of Commissioner Shiroma – Decision Authorizing Deployment of Drivered And Driverless Autonomous Vehicle Passenger Service (C.P.U.C., Oct. 15, 2020)
Dear President Batjer and Commissioners Randolph, Aceves, Rechtschaffen, and Shiroma:
Representing Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund (DREDF) and Disability Rights California (DRC), the undersigned write in strong opposition to the Commission’s Conclusions of Law authorizing the deployment of drivered and driverless autonomous vehicle passenger service by entities without including any particular disability access requirements for the vehicles or services themselves.[1]
The exclusion was intentional. The Commission discussed accessibility, and then expressly declined to include access standards. See Proposed Decision, Section 4.8.2 (“The Commission … elects not to define ‘accessibility’ at this time.”).
Autonomous vehicles (“AVs”) have the potential to dramatically improve mobility, vehicle and road safety for people with disabilities, including people with sensory, cognitive and physical disabilities. However, the promise and safety of AVs will only be realized if the vehicles and the surrounding infrastructure are fully accessible, and the safety elements consider the needs of all disabled people.
Ensuring safety and access for everyone is easier and cheaper if it is integrated at the outset. Safe and accessible AVs will be needed, and even required, when used by publicly funded agencies, and retrofitting will be more expensive for providers in the long run. Autonomous vehicles should be born accessible.
Now is the time for regulatory bodies like the Commission to require that AVs be designed, built, and deployed with accessibility requirements to equally include people with disabilities. These standards should include original equipment manufacturers, as they are in the best position to design AVs with full access. Moreover, in this emerging field, manufacturing and service delivery are often intertwined.
To read DREDF’s full letter to the PUC: Comments on Proposed Decision of California PUC Commissioner Shiroma Authorizing Deployment of Autonomous Vehicle Passenger Service
A Tidbit from Me: In 1982 a law went into effect requiring that all buses purchased going forward be wheelchair accessible. This became national policy on July 26, 1990 with the passage of the ADA. Accessible busses were phased in over time. While our community was excited that we had won the right to ride the bus it took several years before bus routes became fully accessible. Many people with disabilities including myself were often left at the bus stop because there were many more non-accessible busses than there were accessible busses. With autonomous vehicles there is an opportunity to incorporate accessibility in the roll out of th